Tag Archives: wordless wednesday

Narcissus x medioluteus

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

I became curious this week about my last-to-bloom narcissus. With its white perianths and very small cup coronas it’s been in my April garden since 2014.

N. ‘King Alfred’, ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and ‘Thalia’ are all finished just as this little one is starting to open. I wondered why the flowers sit inside the middle of the foliage and what to call it and tried to remember where I bought it.  It was I think just a little temptation in the small floral section of a neighborhood grocery, just a few bulbs lacking identification but packaged to entice.

Surprisingly quickly I found images online that matched my narcissus, read several stories about others who also searched for more information about this daffodil and concluded this is Narcissus x medioluteus.  (Please let me know if you doubt or have more information.)  It is a naturally-occurring hybrid between Narcissus poeticus and Narcissus tazetta. First discovered in France it is naturalized in many places now, including my state of North Carolina in the US.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

The common names I came across most frequently are cemetery ladies or twin sisters—twin sisters because they usually have a pair of flowers on each stem; cemetery ladies because they were often planted around graves in old cemeteries. That they normally exist in pairs threw me at first. I hadn’t at first noticed second buds piggy-backing on the stems, but yes, sure enough.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Other common names for this little daffodil are Primrose-peerless, April beauty, loving couples, pale narcissus,  two-flowered narcissus. The poignant “Cemetery ladies”is the one I shall most likely remember.

Twin Sisters, Cemetery Ladies (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Division 13 – Daffodils distinguished solely by Botanical Name
Consists of the Species, Wild Variants, and Wild Hybrids found in natural daffodils.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Wordless Wednesday – Spring By The Front Corner

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) – View from front porch

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) – View from front porch

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

Helleborus x hybridus

Helleborus x hybridus

Helleborus x hybridus

Wordless Wednesday – Signs

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake) hanging above Columbine

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Frostkiss™ Penny’s Pink’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Wordless Wednesday – Beginnings

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus opened today in southwest corner of the garden.

Almost Wordless Wednesday – Camellias In Situ

Annette of Personal Eden wondered what my sasanquas look like growing in situ as opposed to indoors in a vase. The shrubs are utilitarian, hiding utilities from the street view and yes, we are this close to the neighbors’ drive so they have to be kept trimmed.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’ screen gas utlities next to house on north side. Shrubs have intermingled over the years. They are tightly pruned to keep them from overtaking the neighbors’ drive. Beyond the red ‘Yuletide’ are several gardenias (not in bloom this time of year).

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

 

Wordless Wednesday – Yesterday

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Listen for liquid bird song at 16 seconds. Maybe Brown Cow Bird?

More of the liquid bird song.

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

Wordless Wednesday – Garden Benefits

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

Junonia coenia (common buckeye)

Zebra Swallowtail (Eurytides marcellus)

Zebra Swallowtail (Eurytides marcellus)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)

 

Wordless Wednesday – Deep Color In Late June

Virgie’s Rose

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Bumblebee (Bombas) on Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)

Wordless Wednesday – Making The Rounds

Bumble Bee (Bombus griseocollis) identified through iNaturalist.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Wordless Wednesday – Red

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville (may be ‘Michael Arnholt’

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville (may be ‘Michael Arnholt’

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville (may be ‘Michael Arnholt’

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville (may be ‘Michael Arnholt’

Ruby Slippers, which opens pure white and then turns red, is shifting its color.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Wordless Wednesday – Late May

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) needs to be trimmed back and thinned out, but the bees convinced me to keep it awhile.

Currently lighting up the meditation circle Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) is a another favorite of the bees.

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Wordless Wednesday—June On The Wane

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Common Eastern Bumble Bee (Bombus impatiens)

Common Eastern Bumble Bee (Bombus impatiens)

Eastern carpenter bee (Xylocopa virginica)

Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia)