Tag Archives: wordless wednesday

Wordless Wednesday – Autumn and Camellia Fruits

Smiling Fruit on Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Wordless? Well, just a few whispers this rainy (yes actual rain is falling) Wednesday.

Welcoming September Equinox with a wistful sigh today Sep 22 3:21 pm EDT.

The garden’s nearly 20 year old Camellia sasanquas ‘Yuletide’ have produced fruits this year. I have a record of this pollinator achievement one other time in a photo taken also on this day in the year 2012.

Wordless Wednesday – Mid-September Juncture

Reblooming Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

Dahlias From The Garden – No ID

Zinnia elegans ‘Purple Prince’

Zinnia elegans ‘Purple Prince’

Zinnia elegans ‘Purple Prince’ and Common Lantana

Dahlia ‘Totally Tangerine’

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ and Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Wordless Wednesday – Early August Morning

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Dahlia Border Decorative ‘Gallery Pablo’

Dahlia Border Decorative ‘Gallery Pablo’

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

Dahlia Ball ‘Petra’s Wedding’

Dahlia Ball ‘Petra’s Wedding’

Gardenia jasminoides ‘August Beauty’

Wordless Wednesday – June Flowers

Spiderwort and Nasturtium ‘Vesuvius’

Salvia nemorosa ‘Blue Hill’ (Meadow Sage)

Hydrangea macrophylla

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Yellow dot at center right is Firefly!   Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Lily Asiatic ‘Royal Sunset’

Sky At Sunset June 14, 2021

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily) At Sunset June 14, 2021

Friday Reflections

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

The weather has been ideal for gardening this week and I have put in a few hours each day and nearly all day on Thursday.  There are so many tasks that need attention that no matter which one I set out to do, I am finding it hard not to become distracted and end up working on something else.

I have been planting seeds, bulbs, perennials and dahlias.  I must have really craved color and flowers this winter, but it is hard to know where I imagined I could plant everything I ordered.

As part of my “Friday reflections” I wrote and then deleted paragraphs about weeds, bermuda grass infestations, yellow jacket nests. Sharing the positive highlights of the garden is more exciting.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

This week I have seen butterflies: monarch, black swallowtail, and a pearl crescent (every day). None was interested in posing for me or even getting close so the image quality is poor, but I want to post them here as a record.

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

I was pleased to see a Bumble Bee checking out the ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe.

Bumble Bee and ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

Bumble Bee and ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

A green anole sunned on the back garage steps and scurried just for a moment each time I passed, before settling back into its sunny spot.

Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)

More irises opened and others are close. This is one my garden blogger friend from Petals and Wings (now mostly on instagram) sent me last fall. I’m not sure if they will bloom this year but they are growing and look healthy. The variegated foliage caught my attention and the flower is purple/blue.

Iris (passalong)

Iris (passalong)

Many of my Iris tectorum have disappeared in the past couple years, so I am especially happy to welcome this one back.

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Another iris of note, this one is one of the only ones I have actually purchased.

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Hope you are having a wonderful week in and out of the garden.

Narcissus x medioluteus

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

I became curious this week about my last-to-bloom narcissus. With its white perianths and very small cup coronas it’s been in my April garden since 2014.

N. ‘King Alfred’, ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and ‘Thalia’ are all finished just as this little one is starting to open. I wondered why the flowers sit inside the middle of the foliage and what to call it and tried to remember where I bought it.  It was I think just a little temptation in the small floral section of a neighborhood grocery, just a few bulbs lacking identification but packaged to entice.

Surprisingly quickly I found images online that matched my narcissus, read several stories about others who also searched for more information about this daffodil and concluded this is Narcissus x medioluteus.  (Please let me know if you doubt or have more information.)  It is a naturally-occurring hybrid between Narcissus poeticus and Narcissus tazetta. First discovered in France it is naturalized in many places now, including my state of North Carolina in the US.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

The common names I came across most frequently are cemetery ladies or twin sisters—twin sisters because they usually have a pair of flowers on each stem; cemetery ladies because they were often planted around graves in old cemeteries. That they normally exist in pairs threw me at first. I hadn’t at first noticed second buds piggy-backing on the stems, but yes, sure enough.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Other common names for this little daffodil are Primrose-peerless, April beauty, loving couples, pale narcissus,  two-flowered narcissus. The poignant “Cemetery ladies”is the one I shall most likely remember.

Twin Sisters, Cemetery Ladies (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Division 13 – Daffodils distinguished solely by Botanical Name
Consists of the Species, Wild Variants, and Wild Hybrids found in natural daffodils.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Wordless Wednesday – Spring By The Front Corner

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) – View from front porch

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) – View from front porch

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

Helleborus x hybridus

Helleborus x hybridus

Helleborus x hybridus

Wordless Wednesday – Signs

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake) hanging above Columbine

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Frostkiss™ Penny’s Pink’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Helleborus Honeymoon ® ‘Vegas Nights’

Wordless Wednesday – Beginnings

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus First hellebore to bloom this year–this one opened yesterday in the northern side garden.

Helleborus x hybridus opened today in southwest corner of the garden.

Almost Wordless Wednesday – Camellias In Situ

Annette of Personal Eden wondered what my sasanquas look like growing in situ as opposed to indoors in a vase. The shrubs are utilitarian, hiding utilities from the street view and yes, we are this close to the neighbors’ drive so they have to be kept trimmed.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’ screen gas utlities next to house on north side. Shrubs have intermingled over the years. They are tightly pruned to keep them from overtaking the neighbors’ drive. Beyond the red ‘Yuletide’ are several gardenias (not in bloom this time of year).

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

 

Wordless Wednesday – Yesterday

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Listen for liquid bird song at 16 seconds. Maybe Brown Cow Bird?

More of the liquid bird song.

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)