Tag Archives: winter garden

Winter Garden

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

After some very cold days this week with lows around 26 and highs in the 40s, today feels much more moderate, overcast with high of 65. Despite the cold spell Daphne odora (Winter daphne) still scents the air deliciously but the foliage has yellowed a bit. There are two Daphnes planted in front of the house. A variegated one, Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata,’ succumbed suddenly a couple of years ago.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

More hellebores are opening around the garden. Some I bought and planted 18 years ago, some were a gift from garden club friend, Vicki, about 2006. In February 2016 I added a few more specialty ones from Pine Knot Farms in Virginia that seem to open later.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Daffodils are primed, cautiously holding back. Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) is waking.

Narcissus With Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

In A Vase On Monday – Winter Boughs

In A Vase On Monday – Winter Boughs

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden encourages us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

After unseasonably warm (but wet) weather in January, Sunday night lows plunged to 25F. I have seen a clump of yellow daffodils blooming in my neighborhood. None of mine have opened but there are a few buds.

Daphne odora came into full bloom this week and outdoors any excuse will do to walk by the deliciously scented shrubs. For today’s vase I gathered several large stems to feature.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

A few hellebores just starting to flower were selected also to contribute soft color and form.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Bits of fresh verdant foliage—arum, camellia, and columbine—were added for contrast and texture. The greens serve also to conceal the candleholder adapter filled with florist’s foam.

In A Vase On Monday – Winter Boughs

Materials
Flowers
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Foliage
Arum italicum
Container
Glass Candelabra

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

January Awakenings

On January 4, 2020 little tight hellebore buds were tucked in close to the earth. I just checked on them yesterday and they seemed content to stay hidden.  Today they have awakened.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Yesterday the lemony scent of daphne odora drifted through the air and with today’s breezes the effect is more pronounced.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Foggy Morning Musings

It has been ages since the time when I wrote nearly daily blog entries here at pbmGarden. The goings-on in my garden are still going on, often are photographed and frequently, posts are conceived and begun, only to become abandoned for other priorities.

But the after-holidays have provided a bit of respite and this morning I had a chance to wander out into a mist of fog. First stop just out the front door our river birch beckoned. It was 47 degrees at 9:00 a.m. heading up to 67.

River Birch On Foggy Morning

By the front steps Winter daphne bides its time. Each year once I have detected daphne’s pink buds, I become anxious for the appearance of white blossoms and fragrant perfume.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Near the front sidewalk an enterprising insect architect had been busy fashioning a pyramidal model.

Ilex cornuta ‘Carissa’ (Carissa Holly)

Ilex cornuta ‘Carissa’ (Carissa Holly)

Ilex cornuta ‘Carissa’ (Carissa Holly)

Temperature and rainfall measurements have been all over the place since late October. There have been dark days, wet ones, cold, brisk and sunny ones and a few, balmy. Off and on during this day weak sun broke through for a short time and the sky tended toward blue before settling back into dull whitewashed gray.

I stepped across the street into the neighborhood’s park for a few more photos.

Foggy Morning

Foggy Morning

The trees were filled with birds but I could not make out what kind, nor could I grab an image. I watched them dance from branch to branch and listened to their songs and maybe that was enough.

Foggy Morning

Foggy Morning

Returning home I paused at the front garden to note Iberis (candytuft) planted 18 years ago still manages to if not thrive, survive; whereas, in the meditation circle and other spots in the back gardens it is very short-lived. It is an attractive ground cover even when not in flower. I do not know what is different about this one, not sure of its name. Others I have tried are Iberis sempervirens ‘Alexander’s White’  and ‘Purity.’

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) With Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) With Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Nestling up to the Iberis is visually delicate Aquilegia canadensis. This native columbine is tough despite its dainty look and remains green most of the winter. Leaves sometimes take on a charming purple-red hue.

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) With Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Through the years columbine has helped itself to new locations all around the yard. Recently I have learned to call it a useful ground cover and feel much better about it.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Are you enjoying a lull in your normal routine? Hope the days bring whatever you need, bustle or calm.

In A Vase On Monday – Holiday Cyclamen

In A Vase On Monday – Holiday Cyclamen

Each Monday from Rambling In The Garden Cathy invites us to share a vase assembled from materials collected in our gardens.

My garden club visited a member’s greenhouse during the first week of December. Although Katydid Greenhouses displayed a multitude of poinsettias, cyclamen are what I prefer for decorating with during the holidays.

Katydid Greenhouses

Fortunately there were plenty of cyclamen in varying colors from which to choose.

Katydid Greenhouses

For today’s offering I combined four cyclamen from that field trip with a few Green Trick Dianthus that caught my eye at the local grocery. I finished the arrangement with a few decorative baubles—red seedpods, glass ornaments and ribbons.

In A Vase On Monday – Holiday Cyclamen

Materials

Flowers
Cyclamen
Dianthus barbatus ‘Green Trick’
Foliage
Cyclamen
Philodendron
Container
Silverplate Bowl and Tray

White cyclamen are my favorite but this dark pink was too appealing to leave behind.

In A Vase On Monday – Holiday Cyclamen

In A Vase On Monday – Holiday Cyclamen

Yesterday’s view of the meditation circle and garden was a snowy winter wonderland.  Fortunately I managed to get all my bulbs planted early in the week. I hope they’re settled in and enjoying a nice chill.

December Snow

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Winter Tracings And Seeking Inspiration

As predicted, yesterday afternoon temperatures dropped. Rain turned to sleet and snow, quickly dusting and revealing the garden borders and meditation circle.

It is sunny this morning. The snow will soon depart, but the image leaves me contemplating why my garden design has become so stuck. I have not given it enough attention in recent years—I know that. But even when I was actively trying, I never dreamed big enough it seems.

I say that because recently my husband and I have begun watching episodes on Netflix of two British reality TV shows on landscape gardening.

One featuring Monty Don is titled Big Dreams, Small Spaces. In this series he visits lucky home gardeners, hears their goals and plans, makes suggestions, then returns once to check on progress, and a final time to reveal the results to his viewers and celebrate with a glass of champagne with the garden owners family and friends. By the end of the show the home gardeners have cut down trees, invasive vines and cleared rubbish; built walls, ponds, terraces and pathways; planted orchards, installed living walls and created multiple borders around their property all full of hundreds of English garden flowers in full bloom.

The other show is a bit of a tear jerker, but it is more interesting to me. Love Your Garden features horticulturist Alan Titchmarsh. This show’s premise has him going around the U.K. providing garden makeovers for deserving citizens. The garden owners are sent away for a while (exactly how long is not clear) while a team of experts comes in creates a garden customized for the owners needs and interests. I like this show better because there is more effort to introduce and describe the plants being used, money seems never to be an issue, and the labor it takes to do such projects seems more accurately portrayed.  There are a few awkward contrivances, nods toward the reality show template that try to hype or to create drama, tension or humor—the show would be better without these distractions—but the episodes are full of information.

Both of these shows do a good job of showcasing public and private gardens where one can find inspiration for solving similar garden problems. Only one season each of these British shows are currently available, but I hope more will be released here.

While I am dreaming of a complete garden overhaul, I am curious what you think. Are you familiar with these garden icons? Do you study their books? Have you watched the shows?  Where do you find inspiration?