Tag Archives: narcissus

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A second group of irises abruptly opened all at once on Saturday. My first thought was to showcase them in a lush bouquet, but as springtime settles in there is competition for what enters the Monday vase. So this week only one stalk of iris stands sentry. This is Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’ (and friends).

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A late-blooming narcissus and Solomon’s seal were two surprises I had not remembered to expect.  Finding them changed the direction today’s vase took. The pair proved challenging to combine but I like the echo of yellow between the trumpet of one and the broad leaves of the other.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

The Solomon’s seal is a 2-year old passalong from my friend Chris.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

I stair-stepped the narcissus faces in parallel with the dangling flowers of Solomon’s seal; eventually the effect was lost to the greater cause of trying to balance the overall design.

In the end the physical limitation of the floral pin in the vase dictated the final look.  There just was room to add a slender stem of Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple.’

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Materials
Flowers
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Narcissus
Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple’
Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)
Foliage
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Vase
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Late February Profferings

In A Vase On Monday - Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

In A Vase On Monday – Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.  After last Monday’s snow, sleet and ice covered the garden once more, the weather relented, and the days since have been mild and mostly sunny.

The Coral Delight Camellia featured last week with rescued, faded blooms is back with a fresher look. And Hellebores deserve a share of spotlight as they are at last coming into full flower in the garden.

Late February Profferings

Late February Profferings

As I gathered these cut flowers on Sunday morning I intended to work them all into a single arrangement. But after conditioning them in water (while my husband and I ran out to brunch with a friend), it seemed quicker and more manageable to keep the two main types of flowers separated.

There were a half-dozen camellias in bloom, perfect for displaying in a set of footed cordial glasses.

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ has a semi-double flower, deep coral pink in color. The plant is slow-growing, aspiring to 6-8 feet high. This one is about 4.5 feet tall after about ten years, with dark, shiny foliage.

The blooms are brushed with white markings on the petals.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Hellebores in my garden have been reluctant to open this winter. I visited a hellebore farm yesterday with a friend and we were surprised to find fewer blooming plants than imagined. When I have organized my pictures I will write more about the visit and purchases.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Only one daffodil was blooming yesterday, but many more are about to burst onto the scene.  I included it with the hellebores for a sparkle of color. Purple stems of statice from a store-bought bouquet from last month and a piece of Shorty Euphorbia from last week’s vase were used as filler.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The hellebores were placed into a Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase, detailed with pansy motif and leaves around the rim.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
6 Cordial glasses (footed) with silver caddy

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (shorty Spurge)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Limonium sinuatum (statice)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)
Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Two Delights

In A Vase On Monday-Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.  Today I have two small, but colorful, vases to share.

First Vase

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

The first vase honors a Coral Delight camellia that burst in bloom Friday despite frigid temperatures.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

I cut the three semidouble flowers that were open and brought them indoors Saturday. By Sunday when I photographed them, they had faded significantly, but in a graceful, dignified way that I find compelling.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

Once again a cutting of Daphne odora fills out the vase.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

A second vase

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

It was 15°F Saturday night yet anemones were freshly budding when I went out early Sunday morning to check out the garden. The anemone stems were only two or three inches above the soil and their flowers were tiny, the size of my thumbnail.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Across the way a couple of undersized, misguided daffodil buds revealed their yellow petals. Daffodils have been very hesitant to open in this unpredictable weather. Usually by now many more would be open and the flowers would be much larger.

Narcissus 'King Alfred' (trumpet daffodil)

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Together the anemones and daffodils were barely enough to form a miniature posy. For a bit of greenery I added the tip of a flowering Euphorbia ‘Shorty.’

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

I chose a vase with a fairly small neck, yet the flowers sink and are a bit overwhelmed by the size of the container (4.25 inches high x 2.25 inches wide).

A. coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ is more lavender than these photographs portray. I experimented with a setting the color option on my camera to “vivid” and I like the resulting strong color, but the flower’s blue is overstated in these images.

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride
Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

Everything Is New

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Recently my yoga teacher suggested the class think of the phrase everything is new as we moved through the poses. The idea was to pay attention to every aspect of each asana as if we were experiencing the posture for the first time.

I brought home the phrase to use with my garden. Adopting everything is new will not require starting over with new plants nor throwing out accumulated knowledge from my few years of gardening.  The phrase simply inspires me to pay attention without overthinking everything.

Observe. Take time to notice.

Everything is new reminds me to focus on the joy of being in the garden and experience gardening anew.

Narcissus

 

Narcissus For The Neighborhood

Narcissus

Narcissus

One thousand daffodil bulbs sit in my garage awaiting planting this weekend. Happily I am not responsible for the actual planting. Who knew how heavy bulbs can be?

The grounds committee for my neighborhood, of which I am a member, ordered 500 Ice Follies and 500 King Alfred to be distributed among our central common areas and around our eight cul-de-sacs.

Ice Follies and King Alfred

Ice Follies and King Alfred

I pushed for one large river of daffodils, but am satisfied these bulbs will make a nice welcome in spring.

Narcissus bulbs will brighten the neighborhood in spring.

In A Vase On Monday—Spring Assemblage

In A Vase On Monday-9Cathy’s weekly challenge entitled In A Vase On Monday encourages gardeners to create floral designs from materials gathered in our own gardens. Looking for inspiration late yesterday, after a cold, rainy and windy weekend, the grass squished under my feet while I gathered blooms and foliage from around the garden’s edges.

There were not large quantities of any one flower, but in the end I collected an adequate sampling of spring blossoms for Monday’s display.

White Narcissus ‘Thalia’ are only just beginning to open and a sole hyacinth escaped the winter’s chill.

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

For containers I selected four footed cordial glasses from a set of six, a well-loved and often-used wedding present from a dear friend. I also chose a small crystal vase that belonged to a maternal aunt.

In A Vase On Monday

To use as a feathery, airy filler I cut freshly emerging Achillea leaves. From a nearby container I also selected a few leaves of Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage) that had not been damaged by the rough weather.

Achillea leaves contrast with Muscari buds

Achillea leaves contrast with tight form of Muscari racemes

In foreground leaves of Salvia Dorada 'Aurea' (Golden Sage) merge with those of Iberis sempervirens

In foreground, leaves of Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage) merge with those of Iberis sempervirens

The vase holding the Thalia and several Tete-a-Tetes made a pleasant individual arrangement, with the daffodils hovering above a base of Iberis sempervirens.

Narcissus 'Thalia', Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus 'Thalia', Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Picked from the path of the meditation circle, purple violas with deep golden centers proved difficult to photograph, their rich dark color resisting the camera, but this image reflects the strong hue fairly accurately.

Violas

Violas

The grape hyacinths are extra small this year and scarce, but these few fan out to make a large impact when paired with Iberis.

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

I find the flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) so charming and I admire the pure white, creamy petals. Repeating Iberis among multiple vases ties the arrangements together.

Creamy white flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Creamy white flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

It was fun to collect and disperse these spring flowers among a set of vases this Monday.

Materials List
Achillea x ‘Appleblossom’ (Yarrow)
Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’
Narcissus ‘Thalia’
Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage)
Viola
crystal vase, acrylic doughnut-shaped stem holder, footed cordial glasses

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Enjoy visiting her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday. I am headed over there right now.

In A Vase On Monday—A Beacon Of Spring

Narcissus1

Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday encourages gardeners to collect and arrange flowers or other plant specimens from their gardens each week. What is in your vase this week?

At this mid-March juncture with the equinox only a few days away, I gathered fresh lavender and branches of almost-open spiraea, along with narcissus and Daphne odora. The daphne currently is in full bloom and carries a magnificent lemony fragrance; however, once I began creating an arrangement for this week, it was the narcissus that drew me in.

Narcissus4

Narcissus requires no embellishment. This venerable herald of spring evokes simple design and pure color. First I selected a tall ceramic pot that was a special gift from my daughter. Matte-finished and blue-black in color, this container was the perfect size to hold two of my daffodil varieties, ‘King Alfred’ and an unknown kind featuring white perianth with a ruffled, pale yellow cup (I had been thinking of it as ‘Thalia’ until I looked it up today. This one is not pure white, so it is possibly Narcissus ‘Ice Follies’ or Narcissus ‘Mount Hood’?).

Narcissus2

Initially I used a small matte-finish, periwinkle blue vase to hold a group of miniature Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’. Later I exchanged that vase for a dark green glossy one that seemed better able to handle the greenish hue of the Tete-a-Tetes.

Narcissus5

Narcissus6

As an aside, i would mention I photographed the flowers today in a niche in our foyer, a spot that normally holds a bust of Thomas Jefferson. Mr. Jefferson is a strong interest of study for my husband. Nearby is a modern chair made of cherry, maple and walnut, designed and built by my daughter while earning her industrial design degree.

Narcissus3

Thanks very much to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Visit her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday