Tag Archives: Narcissus ‘King Alfred’

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden encourages us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Large-trumpet golden King Alfred daffodils ushered in early spring this past week just in time to be smacked down by rain and wind.  I gathered a generous bunch to share in a vase this week.  Many of these were resting on the earth so it made sense to salvage as many as possible and restore a modicum of dignity to these regal flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

Materials
Flowers
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Foliage
Container
Straight-sided glass vase

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

After a stormy week in many parts of the world, I hope everyone is safe. Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the globe. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In a vase this week.

Part Of A Landscape

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Singer and songwriter James Taylor grew up in Chapel Hill, exploring as a child the wooded banks of Morgan Creek before the land along there was developed and fashioned into suburbia. He references this place in his song “Copperline.”

Speaking with Rolling Stone in 2015, Taylor said: “This is another song about home, about my father, about a childhood that was very peaceful, which is a rare thing today. I felt like I was part of a landscape in those days – the trees, the streams and the rivers, the animals that lived there.”
Songfacts. Retrieved February 8, 2020.

During my college days at Carolina, Taylor’s unique voice was a constant in our dorm, as roommate, suite mates and I sang and danced along. I can easily place my freshman self right back at his concert in Carmichael Auditorium, listening to bittersweet sound of “Fire and Rain,” cheering the spirit of his “Carolina In My Mind,” and believing him when he sang “You’ve Got a Friend.”

It was Carole King’s lyrics of this last song that set me thinking down this path this morning, “Winter, spring, summer, or fall.” Our weather is more likely to be “winter, spring, winter, spring, summer, winter, summer, fall, actually summer again, eventually fall, just kidding–summer…” and that is just during a two-week period. It was winter here again at early morning, 27 degrees F. with frosty coatings atop the grass and plants in the garden.

Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow)

Another line from “You’ve Got a Friend” rang true as well this week: “If the sky… above you should turn dark and full of clouds.” The past few days here were marked by fierce rain, wind and tornado warnings. The river birch easily gave up stray branches all over the yard, the garden sank below standing water for a while. Some trees were down, lots of neighbors lost power, but we were spared. I righted new pots of hellebores that were blown over from a spot where they have been patiently waiting to be planted. If it will dry out a bit I can see that happening soon.

Hellebores

Hellebores

After several weeks of cautious peeking, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and ‘King Alfred’ had finally begun opening earlier in the week, just before being battered by rain

Daffodils In The Rain

Narcissus

Fortunately daffodils are as resilient as they are bright and cheerful.

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Winter daphne is beginning to exhibit tiredness and a few of the flowers have begun to fade. The intoxicating fragrance was heightened earlier in the week when temperatures reached 70s, but was not detectable early this cold morning. The sky at 9 a.m. was rich with blue, but gloomy gray clouds descended soon thereafter and hung over the day.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Planted last May this perennial seems poised to flower: Armeria pseudarmeria ‘Ballerina Lilac’. I am anxious to see how it performs but it does seem to have made a too early appearance.

Armeria pseudarmeria ‘Ballerina Lilac’

Armeria pseudarmeria ‘Ballerina Lilac’

I planted over a hundred anemone bulbs in the borders last year. They are very short-lived in my garden but a disappointing number, most in fact, failed to live or show up at all, perhaps victims of squirrels and voles. Now a few extras that I had stuck into plastic pots and tucked among some other plants have emerged the past few weeks. The flower heads are tucked down. Blue or white? Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’ or A. St Brigid ‘Mt Everest’, which one survived?

Anemone

In A Vase On Monday – Daffodils

In A Vase On Monday – Daffodils

Every Monday Cathy from Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase assembled from materials collected in our gardens.

Last week I mentioned the first daffodils had begun opening in my garden and many more have opened since. I have been seeing them around town three or four weeks earlier. And on Friday I spotted a clump near the roadside that ignited my imagination. How many years I wondered have they survived encroachment from highway and utility crews, their appearance marking a place where once the land supported a family and a way of life.

Seeing the roadside patch of daffodils reminded to search back for an old post.  Hope you won’t mind that I decided to share with you again.

But first, today’s vase: a handful of Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ and a few N. ‘Tete-a-Tete’ placed into a favorite blue matte-finished ceramic jar. I love picking daffodils. There is immense satisfaction in reaching down to the bottom of each stem and snapping it as one would snap a green bean. It is impossible not to smile.

In A Vase On Monday – Daffodils

Materials
Flowers
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’
Container
Handmade ceramic lidded jar

In A Vase On Monday – Daffodils

Daffodils

I grew up inside a small town in the rural south, surrounded by fields of cotton, tobacco, corn and soybeans. Driving away from town with my family to visit relatives on Sundays, riding past these fields, nearly every house I would see for miles and miles at this time of year had a clump or two of dancing yellow daffodils, announcing spring.

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

As one would expect time has altered this bucolic landscape. Driving in the countryside nowadays past these old homesites, there is evidence of past lives. With owners having died out, many of these old homesteads now sit abandoned. Heirs perhaps found jobs elsewhere and live too far away to maintain the homes, yet they keep memories alive by holding onto the property. Or perhaps they await better offers from the developers.

Regardless, often the land sits idle. Even if the buildings are long gone, almost always there remains a towering oak tree beside where the house once stood, and nearby, a patch of daffodils.

One spring along a familiar stretch of road that my husband and I had travelled for many years, I pointed out to him just such an old homesite.

I had never known who once had lived there, but the cheerful daffodils blooming near the old drive were a sight I knew to expect and to watch for.

Viewed from a car window those flowers had greeted me annually for decades, as they must have welcomed home the family that once inhabited the property.  I haven’t travelled that road in a while, but that season I was not disappointed.

Intrigued, my husband wrote this poem.

Daffodils

Within this clearing rife with weeds,
No homely headstones stand askew,
But daffodils in patches tell
That here once worked a hand, a heart,
And there once stood a house, a home.

No headstones set this ground apart,
But daffodils in patches tell
Of heart and home as sure as bones.

(DVM, v.G, April 2007)

Reprinted: (Daffodils. February 15, 2013. https://pbmgarden.blog/2013/02/15/daffodils/).

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share daffodils and other flowers across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Colors Of Spring Trio

In A Vase On Monday – Colors Of Spring Trio

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Today’s trio of vases features pastel hyacinths and golden daffodils, punctuated by jolts of deep purple anemones. I removed one pink hyacinth that clashed with the daffodils to a separate vase off-camera.

Between the smaller vases, hyacinths and anemones trade spaces in and out of the water.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ With Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ With Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Foliage
Dracaena deremensis warneckii ‘Lemon Lime’
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Vase
2-inch round holder with integrated florist’s frog
Clear glass vodka shot glasses

In A Vase On Monday – Colors Of Spring Trio

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Harbinger of Spring

In A Vase On Monday – Harbinger Of Spring

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and ‘King Alfred’ signal spring in this southern garden.

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Hyacinthus orientalis

A few hyacinths are blooming also and this pale, pale yellow one is actually the starting point of today’s vase.

Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)

Stems were inserted into a florist’s frog and placed on a white ceramic square dish for a quick arrangement, as in the first image.

I tried two different vase options—I like both. Here is a shallow blue ceramic dish with purple overtones.

In A Vase On Monday – Harbinger Of Spring

Materials
Flowers
Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’
Foliage
Daffodil leaf
Vase
Florist’s frog
White ceramic square dish / Blue ceramic vase

Another One

A generous mixed bouquet in a large porcelain vase graced the refreshment table this past Saturday as I participated in an all-day silent yoga retreat. The retreat was a lovely experience, a great mix of yoga, sitting and walking meditation, journaling, mediation and more yoga.  At the end of the day I was offered the chance to select some flowers to bring home. Not wanting to break up the arrangement, I chose just this one, richly colored perfect Gerbera daisy.

Gerbera From Silent Yoga Retreat

I paired the gerbera with a branch from the native eastern redbud, added the first anemones of the year and tucked in a sprig of soon to bloom candytuft.

In A Vase On Monday – Harbinger Of Spring

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr Fokker’
Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud)
Gerbera
Foliage
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Vase
White ceramic square dish. Florist’s frog in black plastic cup

Have a great week everyone. I am behind reading blogs but trying to catch up soon. Love seeing what you are up to in your own gardens.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Wednesday With Words—Daffodils

The first daffodils began opening this week at pbmGarden. Their appearance reminded me of something I recorded a few years back, so the following is adapted from a previous post (Daffodils. February 15, 2013. https://pbmgarden.blog/2013/02/15/daffodils/)

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

I grew up inside a small town in the rural south, surrounded by fields of cotton, tobacco, corn and soybeans. Driving away from town with my family to visit relatives on Sundays, riding past these fields, nearly every house I would see for miles and miles at this time of year had a clump or two of dancing yellow daffodils, announcing spring.

As one would expect time has altered this bucolic landscape. Driving in the countryside nowadays past these old homesites, there is evidence of past lives. With owners having died out, many of these old homesteads now sit abandoned. Heirs perhaps found jobs elsewhere and live too far away to maintain the homes, yet they keep memories alive by holding onto the property. Or perhaps they await better offers from the developers.

Regardless, often the land sits idle. Even if the buildings are long gone, there almost always remains a towering oak tree beside where the house once stood, and nearby, a patch of daffodils.

One spring along a familiar stretch of road that my husband and I had travelled for many years, I pointed out to him just such an old homesite.

I had never known who once had lived there, but the cheerful daffodils blooming near the old drive were a sight I knew to expect and to watch for.

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Viewed from a car window those flowers had greeted me annually for decades, as they must have welcomed home the family that once inhabited the property.  I haven’t travelled that road in a while, but that season I was not disappointed.

Intrigued, my husband wrote this poem.

Daffodils

Within this clearing rife with weeds,
No homely headstones stand askew,
But daffodils in patches tell
That here once worked a hand, a heart,
And there once stood a house, a home.

No headstones set this ground apart,
But daffodils in patches tell
Of heart and home as sure as bones.

(DVM, v.G, April 2007)

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

What flowers do you notice as markers of past existence?

In A Vase On Monday—Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

Finally in full bloom in the southwestern border, hellebores were the starting inspiration for today’s arrangement.  These are not the ones recently purchased at the hellebore farm, but were passed along from Vicki, a yoga and garden club friend, about five years ago.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Growing on the north side of the house Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ is full of flowers and plenty of fat buds promise many more. One branch of this camellia was included to add color interest and serve as a focal point.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

A redbud twig and five or six stems of spiraea were selected to add height and movement to the design. Both of these springtime favorites burst into blossom just in the past couple of days.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Added as a last minute impulse, bright yellow from a trio of Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ lifts the arrangement and ties the other flowers together.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

I grabbed a cranberry-colored glass vase just to hold the hellebores while they were being conditioned, but ended up sticking with it. Not only is the vase a perfect size, but the dark red brings an unexpected element of drama to the spring assortment.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Cranberry red glass vase

On yesterday’s gray afternoon there was little light for picture-taking in the dining room where I moved the arrangement for display. The flowers will brighten up our meals this week (if we eat indoors! Last week we had most meals on the screened porch enjoying the birds and the view of the awakening garden.)

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.