Tag Archives: Monarda didyma (Scarlet bee balm)

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

Each Monday Cathy from Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase assembled from materials collected in our gardens.

Scarlet Beebalm with its spicy, minty scent has been blooming several weeks. I have been planning all week to showcase it in today’s vase, along with red daylilies.

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

Unfortunately Sunday was a resting day for the daylilies and the only blooms open were pretty tired. Think of the pair in the vase as placeholders.

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

Here are a few that were blooming Saturday—they really have been beautiful this year and more will open soon.

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

For filler I chose Salvia greggii, which is blooming better than usual now that some trees are cut and it gets more sun. All these red flowers were most uncooperative when I tried to photograph the arrangement late yesterday afternoon—lots of dark shadow and blobs.

I had Shasta daisies ready to step up and add light but I decided against them. A black and white image underscores the overall dark tones of the arrangement. Next time I would try to balance the lights and darks better. Also I feel the Monarda (beebalm) is a lost against the shaggy foliage of the salvia, the textures are similarly sagging and loose. In person this is much easier to read.

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

Materials
Flowers
Hemerocallis (Daylily)
Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)
Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)
Foliage
Container
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

In A Vase On Monday – Scarlet

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Monarchs Reign

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Lantana camara (Common Lantana)

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Lantana camara (Common Lantana)

A small number of monarchs usually visit my garden in late October but this year I have been spotting one or two at a time for the past month. They disappeared for a couple of weeks during the long rainy period, then returned with the sun.

For much of today I saw four or five dancing around the large lantana.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Lantana camara (Common Lantana)

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Lantana camara (Common Lantana)

There always seemed to be a single monarch sipping nectar from the passalong dahlia by the back steps but the two other dahlias apparently offered no temptation.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Dahlia sp.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Dahlia sp.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Dahlia sp.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) and Dahlia sp.

A tattered and torn male finally settled atop a seedhead of Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) for a rest.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) - male

Danaus plexippus (monarch) – male

The black spot on each hindwing indicates this is a male.

Danaus plexippus (monarch) - male

Danaus plexippus (monarch) – male

Morning Moments In The June Garden

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly 'Michael Arnholt'

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’

We had another nearly 100-degree day yesterday and yet, a fresh daylily greeted me in the garden first thing this morning. A thunderstorm during the night brought welcome rain and it is cooler today, a mere 91°F. Starting tomorrow temperatures will climb again into mid-90sF for another week. When summer starts officially on Sunday what surprise can it bring?

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly 'Michael Arnholt'

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’

Part of the Monarda border fell victim to the storm’s strong wind and rain, actually a small price to pay in exchange for not needing to water this morning.

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

I planted some new purple gladioli for cutting this year, but the first to flower is a salmon one from many years ago.

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

Several weeks ago I pulled up last fall’s snapdragons from the meditation circle, but as an experiment I left one along the front edge of the northern border. Surprisingly it continues to bloom despite the heat, its rich blossom, still drenched from last night’s rain, seems impossibly smooth and glossy red.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

I added several new Liatris spicata (Gayfeather) to the border this spring. Rather than opening, some of the flower tips just turned brown from the heat, but this one is off to a good start.

Liatris spicata (Gayfeather)

Liatris spicata (Gayfeather)

With the appearance of its first multicolored flowers open today, Lantana camara is making a comeback in the southern border. It had died back to the ground during this year’s cold winter.

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Just on the other side of the fence from the lantana, one of my favorite vignettes from this morning’s garden walk is a large patch of self-seeded Cleome at the southern entrance to the garden. While the gate and much of the garden was still in shade, the flowers were bathed in the sun’s early light.

Sunny Patch of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Sunny Patch of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

A nectaring bee found the cleome enticing.

Bee Nectaring on Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Bee Nectaring on Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Red Hot At Mid-June

Hummingbird Moth on Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Hummingbird Moth on Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

A Hummingbird Moth was attracted to the scarlet flowers of Monarda didyma yesterday morning. I did not notice there actually were two moths until I saw the photograph below.

Hummingbird Moth on Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Hummingbird Moth on Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

The garden at mid-June is hanging on by a thread, or rather hanging on by a hose. If not for early-morning watering many plants would be crispy and brown, the way the grass is becoming. Fortunately a few things, like Monarda, are tolerant and seem to manage fine.

Rain would help, but with none in sight, heat is the main story this week. Today it is already 95°F/35°C at mid-afternoon. Expected highs on Monday and Tuesday are 98°F/36.6°C and 99°F/37.2°C—unusually severe for this early in the summer.

Alliums are generally short-lived in my garden but this group of Allium Atropurpureum has managed to return for the past couple of years.

Allium Atropurpureum

Allium Atropurpureum

Last night I made an unexpected discovery on the back side of a border, a rabbit nest I think. Never identified much with Mr. McGregor and I will not be running around with a hoe, but I am definitely keeping the little blue velvet jacket if Peter snags it on the fence.

Rabbit Nest

Rabbit Nest

Rabbit Nest

Rabbit Nest

Rabbit Nest

Rabbit Nest

Monarda didyma

Several people asked about the new header. It shows the first flower in a large stand of native Monarda didyma (Scarlet bee balm). Even in early winter I could notice its minty aroma. Hummingbirds have already been visiting the garden. They should become more frequent as Monarda continues to open.

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)