Tag Archives: meditation garden

Wordless Wednesday—Around And About

Southern Side Path

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Southern Border (Facing North)

Passed along as Japanese Iris

Iris hybrid

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’ and Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’ and Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Chrysanthemum, Daylily, Old-fashioned Rose

Old-fashioned Rose

Rhododendron ‘Robin Hill Gillie’ (Azalea Gillie)

Southwest Corner

Hellebore, Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells), Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells) in sunlight

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells), Tansy

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells), Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Hellebore, Tansy, Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox), Iris

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear), Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Southwest Island

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)  April 22, 2018.

Buxus x ‘Green Mountain’ (Green Mountain Boxwood), Dahlia ‘Fireworks’, Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, Coreopsis, Iris

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’, Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’, Snapdragon, Dianthus

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’

Iris, Coreopsis

Meditation Circle

Meditation Garden at Early Morning, from Southern Border facing North

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle. Looking toward SW Corner

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle. Looking toward SW Corner

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’, Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle. Looking North

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle.  Facing NW

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’, Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle. Facing NW

Western Border

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ (Wallflower)

Nepeta ‘ Psfike’ (Little Trudy Catmint), Dusty Miller

Northern Border

Iris germanica, Old-fashioned Rose, Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Iris germanica

Tradescantia (Spiderwort), Meadow Sage ‘May Night’

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Iris germanica, Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Iris germanica

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony), Tradescantia (Spiderwort), Iris germanica

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’ April 22, 2018

Barbara Katz’s Garden—2017 Garden Bloggers Fling

Many attendees of the 2017 Gardens Bloggers Fling have reported eloquently about the gardens we visited in June in Washington, DC and surrounds. (See 2017 Capital Region Fling Overview). I managed to write about only a couple of the gardens after returning, but there are a few more I personally wanted to share with you.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

On one morning our first stop took us to a private garden in Maryland created by Barbara Katz. This garden visit was a highlight of the Fling. By way of introduction here is the official tour description:

“Landscape designer Barbara Katz is the owner of London Landscapes, LLC and the creator of this lushly planted hillside garden. The lot slopes 12 feet up to the property line near a 200 year old oak. A waterfall and small pond make use of the slope, attracting birds and wildlife. Filled with annuals and perennials, the garden has a strict color division with plants in tones of orange, white, and purple on one side and yellow, pink, blue, and maroon on the other.”

The day began auspiciously. Humidity and oppressive heat had dogged us the previous day, but then cleared out overnight, leaving the early hour air noticeably fresh.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Front View From the Drive

Upon our arrival Barbara greeted us warmly in her driveway and described how she came to own the property.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

As a landscape designer she had worked with clients on this garden for years. When she learned the clients were planning to move she found it difficult to leave the garden to destiny, and figured out a way to purchase the home. Barbara directed us to the left side entrance toward the hillside garden in back.

Side Garden

As the path was narrow we queued to enter. (I later circled back around to capture this image.) We happily inched our way along, stopping to admire beautiful plantings. Each step brought delight.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Other Flingers have written so well about the plantings, the color combinations, the hardscape and water features in the Katz garden. I simply will share some glimpses of the garden and my reaction.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

As I moved along what stood out to me was the sense of place, a feeling, the impact of being in a special setting.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Before ascending the steps I first traveled the base of the garden. New vignettes opened up with every step.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

This garden really spoke to me. As I explored the paths leading to, from and around the garden, I felt transformed, overcome by the beauty, appreciative of the vision and work that leads one to create such a space.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

After surveying the garden from below I worked my way up the stone steps alongside the waterfall.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

At the top of the garden I found this circular lawn perfectly satisfying. It seemed quite secluded. Just behind where I stood to take this picture there was a shady spot with a wooden bench. Across the way, a gazebo beckoned. I headed in that direction next.

At top of the garden lay a circular lawn on one side, a gazebo across the way.

Looking down from the gazebo side the steepness of the property is evident.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Notice the three empty chairs below on the left? I worked my way toward them.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

I settled on the edge of a seat. From this vantage point I could gaze up at the plantings. I could pause, admire and contemplate. The garden itself was a meditation.

Barbara Katz’s Garden- Bethesda, Maryland

Though surrounded by the din of 50 enthusiastic Flingers, the quiet force of the peaceful setting was more powerful. Human voices receded, even as sounds of birdsong and trickling water reverberated. I felt practically alone in the garden. Noticing. Breathing.  At ease.

This is a garden with a soul.

 

Frosty Winter Solstice Morn

December Solstice (Winter Solstice) Wednesday, December 21, 2016 at 5:44 am. This day is 4 hours, 51 minutes shorter than on June Solstice.

Frosty Thyme In Meditation Circle

Frosty Thyme In Meditation Circle

Frost rimmed foliage of Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers' (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Frost rimmed foliage of Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Tuesday View: August 23, 2016

Tuesday View August 23, 2016

Tuesday View August 23, 2016

Cathy at Words and Herbs hosts the Tuesday View, encouraging garden bloggers to post a photo of the same view of the garden week by week and note the changes.

We were away last week so it has been two weeks between Tuesday views. This scene was taken at today at 8:29 a.m. Again the sunlight has found the tops of the trees but has not yet entered the garden, the contrast making for a poor quality photograph. The sun is not actually so harsh as this looks, but the image underscores how on summer mornings moments in the garden are best enjoyed during this early shady period.

The fescue grass is dying back, patchy with brown spots and an annoying annual grass has snuck into the lawn over the past several years. It grows faster than okra and cannot be kept trimmed.

One of the original thymes along the path has turned completely black the last two weeks. It began discoloring after I trimmed around the pavers, so perhaps I damaged it but I think it is stressed from the weather. In past years it has recovered but it looks messy now. The Pink Chintz thyme in the center is still blooming and Angelonia contributes lots of color.

Tuesday View August 23, 2016

Tuesday View August 23, 2016

Overall the garden is in retreat. There will not be much to see from here on out until early spring when bulbs start peeking out again.

Thanks to Cathy at Words and Herbs for hosting the Tuesday View. Check out her featured view and those of other gardeners.

Tuesday View: August 9, 2016

Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

Cathy at Words and Herbs hosts the Tuesday View, encouraging garden bloggers to post a photo of the same view of the garden week by week and note the changes.

This Tuesday view was taken at yesterday afternoon at 4:53 p.m., about an hour after a storm cloud dropped a small amount of rain. Thunder continued to rumble as I took the photograph.

I have not gardened at all for a week. Most of the thymes still are doing well but some of the original unknown one has died back in a few places (visible at about 4 o’clock in the picture). Otherwise there is little change from last week.

Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

 

 

Thanks to Cathy at Words and Herbs for hosting the Tuesday View. Check out her featured view and those of other gardeners.

Tuesday View August 2, 2016

Tuesday View August 2, 2016

Tuesday View August 2, 2016

Cathy at Words and Herbs hosts the Tuesday View, encouraging garden bloggers to post a photo of the same view of the garden week by week and note the changes.

This Tuesday view shows the early morning garden at 7:14 a.m., under an overcast sky. Several storms this week brought welcome rain, but one also knocked down the larger of two Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) against the fence.

There are fewer flowers this week.  The biggest change I notice this week from last is how brown the neighbors’ sycamore tree has become. At center behind our fence in the photograph, this Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) is often brown and unsightly by this time of year, but  until now it had seemed fine this summer.

One of the first things I planted in the meditation circle was Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue), used to form a wall at one of the turn-arounds help guide walkers along the path.

Meditation Path with Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) at lower right.

This penstemon is evergreen and has proved to be reliable and has produced lots of new plants. They show up in random spots. I leave them for a while and eventually move them into other parts of the garden.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Another penstemon planted at the same time has a lovely purple flower but has proven much less hardy. It is Penstemon mexicali ‘Pike’s Peak Purple.’ Only one has survived through the years, but I am trying to nurse and encourage it. This summer it has done well and is reblooming now.

Penstemon mexicali 'Pike's Peak Purple' and Angelonia ’Serena White’

Penstemon mexicali ‘Pike’s Peak Purple’ and Angelonia ’Serena White’

Penstemon mexicali 'Pike's Peak Purple' and Angelonia ’Serena White’

Penstemon mexicali ‘Pike’s Peak Purple’ and Angelonia ’Serena White’

To wrap up this Tuesday view I must mention the angelonia as it continues to brighten up the meditation circle.

Angelonia ’Serena White’ with Angelonia ’Serena Purple’ in the distance

Thanks to Cathy at Words and Herbs for hosting the Tuesday View. Check out her featured view and those of other gardeners.