Tag Archives: lycoris radiata (spider lily)

Notes On Lilies

Some recent reader comments set me thinking about the lilies currently blooming in my garden. It turns out most of what I think of as lilies are not lilies.

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Lilium ‘Royal Sunset’ and L. ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily) – True lilies belong to the Lilium genus and grow from bulbs.

I don’t remember buying L. ‘Black Out’ in 2016 from a local big box store, as my notes indicate, but since then I have discovered Asiatic lilies are great for use in floral design.  The fragrance is minimal (none in my experience) unlike the overwhelming scent of an Oriental lily.   Several commenters this week were surprised when I used 15 stems of ‘Black Out’ in this week’s Monday vase, but since May 2017 these lilies have bloomed reliably from their home in  a large ceramic container. Over the years they have multiplied and they usually open all at once.

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Piggybacking on their success has not been easy. Lilium ‘Royal Sunset’ planted in the ground in 2020 has been nibbled by rabbits. Most of these have never bloomed but one survived this year and excelled. This single stalk had many buds, unlike the red ones growing in my large container.

Lily Asiatic ‘Royal Sunset’

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)  – Grows from bulbs but oops! Actually in the Amaryllis family.

When I moved into this neighborhood 21 years ago we had a neighbor who also had just moved in also. She was a horticulturalist who quickly joined the grounds committee, organized a community garden club, and set out to fill her yard with interesting plants. One plant she advocated for as typical in a southern garden was Crinum lily. I had never heard of it and don’t think I’ve ever seen one in anyone else’s garden, but a quick web search will support this as a classic southern pass-along.  I’m not wedded to this plant.  It’s huge and grows new “pups” each year. It blooms reliably but almost aways looks to be sweltering from hot summer weather.  We’re not officially in summer but already have had a lot of hot weather and very little rain. Perhaps because I’ve been better about watering the past few weeks I’ve been able to catch my Crinum in a pretty fair mood, but today it was pouty in the mid-day heat. This is its normal demeanor in my garden.

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Here is the crinum on its rare best behavior.

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Crinum × powellii (Crinum lily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) – Oops again! Common names can be confusing. Daylilies are not true lilies.

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

The garden has three daylilies, gifts from my sister when she took my daughter and me to visit a daylily farm a number of years ago. One red daylily opened yesterday followed by a large, darker one this morning. A tangerine one is always the last to flower and hasn’t opened yet this year.

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) – This red was the first to open.

Two other lilies that are not lilies will be in bloom later:

Lycoris radiata, known as the red spider lily, is a plant in the amaryllis family. It blooms in September.

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily). Although they are commonly called ginger lily, they are not a true lily (genus Lilium) or a true ginger plant (genus Zingiber). It blooms in late August or sometimes not until October when the frost catches it.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Do you grow a favorite lily or lily-nicknamed flower?

Red In The Garden – Spider Lily Season

Standing against a backdrop of Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage), lovely Lycoris radiata is in full bloom this week. I marveled at these flowers as a child when year after year they popped up at my grandmother’s house.

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

Today’s arrangement is an overflow of dahlias accented with a few zinnias. Staging the flowers atop a crystal pedestal vase suggests tradition and formality.

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Zinnias and Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)
Foliage
Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’ (Butterfly Gaura)
Vase
Crystal pedestal dish

Zinnia

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

An August Sunday Album

My grandmother’s mossy front yard held a magical surprise and each summer I was delighted by the appearance of her spider lilies. Finally in 2015 I added some to my own garden and today was the magical day they burst forth into bloom.

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Usually there are plentiful zinnias to use indoors butI have left them outside for now, the few zinnias from a second sowing. Finally they are in bloom, six or seven weeks later than normal due to the rabbit “crisis”.

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia

Nearby, asclepias has rebloomed.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

There are other small pleasures.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Unknown dahlia

Phlox paniculata ‘Robert Poore’ (Garden phlox)

Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)

Lantana will continue well into October. On any given day it is a popular gathering place for butterflies and skippers. Today there were six Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, yesterday swallowtails and a couple of monarchs.

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

The oakleaf hydrangea leaves point toward autumn, as do changes in light and pulsating sounds of cicadas, but mostly there is just a knowing deep inside, an inner sense that fall is near.  Every time I stepped outside this past week I felt it.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Swallowtail and Spider

Yesterday (August 15, 2019) I spotted a new garden visitor. This Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) appears tattered and torn as do many of the butterflies I saw this week. (Life ain’t been no bowl of cherries for some of them.) Like so many others it is attracted to the Lantana camara (Common lantana).

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

The iridescent blue on the top surface of the hindwing makes this butterfly especially lovely.

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Here is the Pipevine in action (21 seconds).

The spider mentioned in the title is one of my favorite spiders, Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily). My grandmother grew these near the front foundation of her house and as a young child I was fascinated by the color and form.

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

The tall stems erupted and shot up overnight Wednesday with red tips showing by yesterday the flowers had opened.  I took these images early this morning while rambling through the garden. I wonder if they will last as cut flowers?

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)