Tag Archives: Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

Middle March 2020

Middle March Blooms

This should be a good week for cleaning up the garden beds, planting those hellebores bought a month ago, and for planting a dahlia shipment received this week.  In a spirit of optimism, Wednesday I planted some sweet pea seeds (Lathyrus odoratus ‘Beaujolais’). Wish me luck.

The redbud is in bloom but I have yet to get a good photo. Birdsong lifts the air.

Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

I missed seeing my Gentle Yoga students this morning. Classes are suspended for several weeks. Wishing everyone wellness and calm.

Singing Bowls

Om Peace Peace Peace!

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Last week’s vase included a single anemone. A few more anemones bloomed midweek and finding them precious, I brought them indoors to enjoy. They lasted well tucked loosely into a small Caithness bud vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

Outdoors in the garden yesterday I clipped one more ‘Mr Fokker’ not quite open, along with several tiny sprigs of candytuft and grape hyacinths, and a handful of leucojum.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

The  vase barely had room to hold the additional stems but its colored glass seemed perfect so I kept stuffing them in.

Photographed in late afternoon light the vase eventually ended up in front of our daughter’s carved box of mahogany and tigerwood.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

Materials
Flowers
Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’
Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Container
Caithness glass bud vase

An earlier idea for presentation had awkward proportions but I like the rabbit.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

In A Vase On Monday – Purple-Blue With Light

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Late February Garden With Snow

February Snow Feb 20, 2020 5:18pm

February’s weather is reliably unpredictable and often messy. This past week is typical. There were a few bright sunny mornings but the sun was inconstant. What might have seemed reasonably warm temperatures were made bone-chilling by shifts to dull gray skies that released a see-saw of downpours and drizzle, culminating in a sloppy, wet snow yesterday (Thursday). The snow began falling mid-afternoon and I ventured outside just before dark.

Spirea branches, already in bloom, were covered in icy snow and dipping downward. Tucked deep underneath the shrub, groups of hellebores found some protection.

Hellebores beneath Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Narcissus have been blooming several weeks.

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

The advanced growth of foliage on this patch of iris surprised me.

February Snow -Iris

Despite the curious common name of summer snowflakes, Leucojum aestivum began blooming this week in time for the snow. It is normal for these to appear this time of year. These came from my sisters’ garden about 5 years ago.

February Snow -Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

Snowfall ended by midnight. The sun shone brightly this morning revealing icy snow high in tree tops and a rich blue sky.

Around 8:30 a.m. a cold breeze stirred the chimes in the meditation circle, making the garden sing against the otherwise quiet hour. Birds were sheltered inside the large drooping spirea whose weighted branches touched the earth, forming a protective avian hideaway. They perched also in nearby trees, all waiting for me to finish taking pictures so they could resume visits to the freshly stocked feeder.

Meditation Circle Feb 21, 2020 8:30am

Much of the snow had disappeared by late afternoon and it is expected to be 61°F. Sunday.

A few days earlier, at eventide on Tuesday, I had braved the rain-saturated ground to walk the garden. Here are a few images from before the snow. This Iberis is such a delight.

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

 

Winter Garden

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

After some very cold days this week with lows around 26 and highs in the 40s, today feels much more moderate, overcast with high of 65. Despite the cold spell Daphne odora (Winter daphne) still scents the air deliciously but the foliage has yellowed a bit. There are two Daphnes planted in front of the house. A variegated one, Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata,’ succumbed suddenly a couple of years ago.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

More hellebores are opening around the garden. Some I bought and planted 18 years ago, some were a gift from garden club friend, Vicki, about 2006. In February 2016 I added a few more specialty ones from Pine Knot Farms in Virginia that seem to open later.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Daffodils are primed, cautiously holding back. Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) is waking.

Narcissus With Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

In A Vase On Monday—April Trio

In A Vase On Monday – April Trio 1

Each Monday Cathy from Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase assembled from materials collected in our gardens.

Flowers blooming in the garden this week make my heart sing! I put together three quick assemblages. The first is a simple highlight of tulips, muscari and anemone.

In A Vase On Monday – April Trio 1

The other two vases mix and match the first iris and dogwood blooms with more muscari, tulips and anemones.

A fading bloom from a phalaenopisis orchid worked its way into this tall blue vase with white Dutch Iris and an early-blooming purple Iris germanica.

In A Vase On Monday – April Trio 2

Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid) with Tulip Triumph ‘Negrita’

Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)

Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)

This Ikebana design was actually created first and began with fresh stems of flowering dogwood. It did not need anything else but I could not stop adding bits of color.

In A Vase On Monday – April Trio 3

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’

Candytuft and Muscari

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Tulip Triumph ‘Negrita’

Materials

Flowers
Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’
Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)
Iberis (candytuft)
Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)
Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)
Muscari ‘Armeniacum’
Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid)
Tulip Triumph ‘Negrita’
Foliage

Containers
One – Hand-thrown Seagrove Pottery (olive-artichoke glaze)
Two – Handmade blue ceramic lidded jar
Three – Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

Hope signs of spring are close to your hearts this week.

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Spring Bulbs

Each Monday Cathy from Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase assembled from materials collected in our gardens.

 

Spring is in full swing in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Pure white Thalia daffodils and graceful stems of Leucojum brighten the outside borders and form the basis of today’s arrangement.

I hadn’t grown tulips in years but last fall decided to try give them a try again.  Perhaps they would have fared better with pre-chilling in the refrigerator; their growth is stunted with the flowers opening at ground level. A few in pots did a little better. Despite short stems these Negrita tulips  have a beautiful rich color and I am happy to have a few to include in a vase.

Mr. Fokker anemone is just starting to flower and the rich bluish purple is strong against the red tulips.

 

A hellebore from last week’s vase complements the tulip color.

Several sprigs of Candytuft and a dozen stems of muscari provide more texture.

Materials

Flowers
Anemone De Caen ‘Mr Fokker’
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iberis (candytuft)
Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)
Muscari ‘Armeniacum’
Narcissus ‘Thalia’
Tulip Triumph ‘Negrita’
Foliage
Iris
Container
Hand thrown ceramic bowl, periwinkle blue glaze

 

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

My sisters from out-of-town and a local friend joined us for a simple Easter Sunday meal yesterday. It was a beautiful spring day. In late evening I stepped out into the garden and cut the most perfect flowers. I had been eyeing them all week.

From a bag of 100 assorted Ranunculus, planted in March 2016, just four plants developed. Having never grown them before I expected a better return, but oh, how lovely are the flowers of the four which persisted.

Ranunculus

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

Placed into a small green ceramic vase with Iberis and Narcissus, the ranunculus are richly delightful—my new favorite flower.

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

Materials

Flowers
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Narcissus
Ranunculus
Green ceramic vase

I read these can be planted in fall in my planting zone so I will try again to grow them.

In A Vase On Monday – Ranunculus

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

For weeks flowers from Hyacinth Sunrise Mix, newly planted this year, have been delightful. Last week I tried to use several hyacinths in an arrangement but the stems shredded apart. Determined to try again, I placed three quickly and firmly into a floral pin. With no rearranging and fussing this time the hyacinths stood fine, a lilac-colored one and two soft pale yellows.

Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ was the first flower collected for today’s vase but there was not enough to feature. Just mere wisps in the vase, its presence is enough to highlight the color of the lilac hyacinth.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

The first flowers of Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ opened this past week. Placed low and off-center it makes a perfect focal flower to accompany the hyacinths.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and newly opened Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ reiterate the purple hue of the clematis, and are placed to add height and width to the design.

Freshly emerging, new leaves of Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy) are tucked around the base of the container and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) add a bright pop of white.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

This arrangement was designed to be viewed from the front but even from the back the appealing textures and colors of the April garden shine through.

Purple Confection – Back View

 

Materials

Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Hyacinth Sunrise Mix
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ (Woodland phlox)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage, Meadow sage)
Foliage
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Mechanics
Blue ceramic vase
3-inch florist’s frog

Here is one more look from the front.

Purple Confection – Back View

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden. This week she is celebrating her fifth blogging anniversary and her Monday In A Vase sensation is in its fourth year. Congratulation Cathy!

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

Spring is finally official and the temperatures are moderating after a brutal cold snap last week. My garden club is sponsoring a flower show this spring that includes three classes (groups): Functional Table For Two, Small Design and Parallel Design.

Unfortunately my schedule has been such that I have been unable to attend the preparatory floral design workshops this year. I decided to try a parallel design on my own this week.

The inspiration comes from the verticality of a now-fading white Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid) that has been blooming since before Christmas,

Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid)

Staging three or more groupings of plant materials placed in strongly parallel arrangement is the basis behind this creative design. Guidelines emphasize it is important to retain negative space between each group while creating a unified overall arrangement.

Accompanied by long green leaves of iris and narcissus the orchid was given central placement.

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

The second grouping, on the right side, features several iris buds that survived this week’s cold, another cluster of narcissus leaves, and a single Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ flower.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Branches of Eastern redbud form the third segment of this arrangement.  They are joined by a folded-over narcissus leaf and another purple-blue anemone.

Each grouping of materials is inserted into its own florist’s frog or pin holder. Large round leaves of Begonia ‘Erythrophylla’ are used to hide the mechanics.

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

Clusters of white Iberis sempervirens and more redbud flowers are used across the base of the arrangement to unify the design.

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

 

Materials

Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’
Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid)
Foliage
Begonia ‘Erythrophylla’ (Beefsteak Begonia)
Iris germanica leaves
Narcissus leaves
Container and Mechanics
Shallow, round, black dish
3 small black plastic Solo bowl
3 florist’s frogs (floral pin holders), 2.5 inch and 3 inch
Black polished stones

In A Vase On Monday – March Parallel

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Spring forward—yesterday marked a return to daylight savings time and we set clocks ahead by one hour. Despite the optimistic spring forward mnemonic, I gathered my flowers well ahead this week, on Friday, to stay ahead of winter’s return. A light snow fell briefly Sunday morning dusting the garden for a couple of hours before giving way to bright blue skies and sunshine. Early forecast models had predicted this might be a much bigger event than it was, but we could not escape below-freezing temperatures for several nights.

With impending cold and snow in mind I collected freely and was able to assemble a couple of designs.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Both arrangements include Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ for a rich punch of color and lovely pure white Narcissus ‘Thalia’ for springtime freshness.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ just opened during the past week.

White Narcissus ‘Thalia’

The first arrangement places Mr. Fokker in a Portmerion porcelain vase with a botanic pattern with echoes of blues, greens and a blush of pink. Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ enlivens the effect, subtle hellebores add balance.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Although designed to be viewed from the front, the back of this arrangement shows off the Acuba’s gold flecks on dark green leaves.

Outside, arching branches of Eastern redbud are in bloom.

Back view highlights Acuba foliage. Eastern redbud is visible outdoors.

The second arrangement was intended to be a simple pitcher of daffodils, the newly opened Narcissus ‘Thalia’, and mostly is.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

In my experience daffodils are strong-willed, non-compliant participants in flower arrangements and work best when used alone. I forgot that lesson this week and fiddled with them for way too long. After a struggle I conceded and let them sit where they wanted; however, I did insist they share the vase with several anemones, grape hyacinths, candytuft and a single Tahiti double daffodil.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

The small bits of muscari and Iberis sempervirens add interesting texture and work well with the colors scheme.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

The stoneware container holding this second design was a wedding gift from my college roommate. I enjoy using this piece. It was made by a well-known local potter, Jim Pringle.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

 

Materials

Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ (Synonym: Camellia japonica x Camellia saluenensis)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Hyacinth orientalis ‘Blue Jacket’
Hyacinth Sunrise Mix
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘Thalia’
Foliage
Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)
Vases
Portmerion- Botanic vase made in England
Stoneware pitcher glazed with bands of cream, green, blue. (from set of 4 cups and pitcher, Pringle Pottery, North Carolina, circa 1977)

Snow or no, this looks like spring to me. Has the season changed for you yet?

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Spring-like temperatures alerted flowers throughout the borders to awaken early this year. Then weekend brought the dreaded below-freezing lows that make farmers and backyard gardeners alike wring their hands. As I looked out Sunday morning, sure enough the neighbor’s saucer magnolia that had seemed primed for loveliness this year instead stood sagging with browned flowers.

In anticipation of joining Cathy at Rambling In The Garden in sharing a Monday vase, I browsed the garden late Sunday morning to gather materials. Surprisingly I found plenty of blooms still looking perky and bright. The ones I collected this week were mostly pink, starting with a winter flowering Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ that had begun showing color by February 24 and finally opened last week.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

I used hellebores last week but these stood out in that each stem had two flowers with very different colors. The top, more recently opened bloom was pink but the lower one had matured toward a striking lime green.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Several branches of native Eastern redbud covered in tight clusters of pink flowers were used to add height, rhythm, and a bit of drama to the arrangement.

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Mounds of pure white Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) are the final ingredient in today’s Monday offering. This is one of my favorite ground covers.

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ (Synonym: Camellia japonica x Camellia saluenensis)
Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
2.5 inch florist’s frog (floral pin holder)
Small black plastic Solo bowl
Black glazed, square ceramic pot base

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

My vision for today’s offering was to form an abstraction by arranging florets and foliage into a pattern—a circle, rectangle or square—laid on a pure white background. The idea evolved into creating the shape on a decorative silver-plated tray and eventually into abandoning the idea altogether and returning to a regular vase of flowers.

Laying down the abstract design was not as straightforward as I had imagined. Interweaving the greenery and blossoms was simple, but soon it was apparent the stems and flowers were going to twist and turn, yielding to gravity rather than to my plans. I needed to find a way to keep them in place.

To solve the problem I decided to build components, similar to small boutonnières, that could be held together by wrapping the stems with florist’s tape. This worked great and they went together quickly. I had gathered enough materials earlier in the day to crank these out all day. But after making a few I began losing interest in completing the original idea of the abstract shape.

I decided to just share the collection of flower sprays.

Building Blocks - boutonnières

Building Blocks – boutonnières

These sprays of flowers would be attractive to tuck around individual place settings for a dinner party.  There are four variations. The first combines Helleborus with foliage of Everlasting sweet pea and Lamb’s ear.

Helleborus with Everlasting sweet pea and Lamb's ear foliage

Helleborus with Everlasting sweet pea and Lamb’s ear foliage

The second pairs Narcissus ‘Thalia’ and Candytuft flowers with Shasta daisy and Lamb’s ear leaves.

Narcissus 'Thalia’ and Candytuft with Shasta daisy and Lamb's ear leaves

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ and Candytuft with Shasta daisy and Lamb’s ear leaves

The third set also uses Shasta daisy and Lamb’s ear leaves for the background. The flowers are Narcissus ‘Thalia’ and Euphorbia ‘Shorty.’

Narcissus 'Thalia’ and Euphorbia 'Shorty'

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ and Euphorbia ‘Shorty’

The last design uses one of my new Hellebores. The interior has matured to green and is edged with the same maroon that is on the exterior of the petals.  I love the greenish hue of this hellebore with the blue-violet of Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker.’  Soft lamb’s ears and a shasta leaf add the finishing touches.

Greenery, Helleborus and Anemone coronaria 'Mr. Fokker'

Greenery, Helleborus and Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

 

Since I actually had polished the silver tray I decided to experiment a few minutes by arranging the the flowers on it.

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

Components arrayed on silver

Components arrayed on silver

Helleborus and Anemone coronaria

Helleborus and Anemone coronaria

 

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)
Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)
Foliage
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Candytuft and Narcissus 'Thalia’

Candytuft and Narcissus ‘Thalia’

No matter that my original concept evolved into something unexpected. I enjoyed the exploration. Eventually I collected the flowers and placed them into a square glass vase to savor this week.

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

In A Vase On Monday—Evolving Design

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Diminutive Treasures

In A Vase On Monday-Sasanquas

In A Vase On Monday-Sasanquas

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

Mornings now are frosty and very little is blooming in the garden. This past week I bought several flats of pansies and violas on sale and planted them out in the meditation circle. I hope they will quickly establish themselves; already a few tiny ones are blooming which I picked for today’s vase.

Viola

Viola

Other minuscule flowers, 3 red dianthus and a sprig of candytuft, were surprise finds, but almost too small to use.

Viola

Viola

 

Viola and Dianthus

Viola and Dianthus

I decided to round out the group with some stems of sedum, yarrow and a couple of camellia buds.

Yarrow

Yarrow

The camellias were larger in scale and became dominant, but the other tiny items add color and texture.

Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Materials
Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow)
Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina Stonecrop)
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Dianthus ‘Ideal Select Red’
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Viola

In A Vase On Monday-Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide' and Dianthus 'Ideal Select Red'

In A Vase On Monday-Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ and Dianthus ‘Ideal Select Red’


These cyclamen and green chrysanthemums are flowers I purchased to use for some early holiday entertaining, so thought I would share them today also. The cyclamen will be used to decorate the fireplace and may eventually make their way into a vase.

Cyclamen

Cyclamen

These versatile glasses were a wedding gift from a college roommate and still good friend. When not in use for serving liqueurs, the glasses work well for holding flowers.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums


Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Azure Medley

In A Vase On Monday - March Medley

Monday brings an opportunity to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly  In A Vase On Monday, where the only rule is to fill a vase using materials gathered from one’s garden.

In A Vase On Monday - Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

In A Vase On Monday – Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

I was excited about cutting a few Azure Muscari this morning to use for my Monday vase. They have just opened in the last couple days. Though there only are 6 growing in my garden, they are so diminutive it seemed worthwhile to cut a few to enjoy close-up.

Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum), the azure grape hyacinth features a bright blue color with a darker blue stripe on each flower. The flowers themselves grow on densely-packed racemes.

In the Pseudomuscari genus the mouth of the flowers is shaped like an open bell, rather than narrowing the way it does on Muscari.

Each flower forms an open bell - Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

Each blue flower forms an open bell – Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

I recently bought 2 round black pin holders, very tiny, just 3/4 inch, so decided to try one out today. It was more difficult to use than expected so I will need to practice more with it. It is hard to get small stems inserted securely without damaging them. Very cute holder though.

3:4 inch Black Pin Holder

3:4 inch Black Pin Holder

For the container I needed something flat and chose the white inside of a lid from a small round box of English bone china. The white side of the lid is visible in the very first image (the official portrait of today’s design). Later I turned the lid over and forgot to turn it back. I was experimenting after noticing the colors of the outside of the box lid might complement the flowers. Of course the top side provides no way to hold water anyway.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Companions for this week’s Azure Muscari are Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea) and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft), both just coming into bloom, along with rich purple Viola that bounced back admirably from a cold winter in the meditation circle.

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Viola

Viola

A scattering of Iberis leaves help balance the design.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Viola And White

In A Vase On Monday3

Monday again! Time to join Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday to create a floral arrangement from materials gathered in one’s own garden.

Although photographed together this morning, my two Monday vases were prepared early and used separately as casual arrangements during a visit from my two younger sisters yesterday.

During the photo session Mr. Th. Jefferson waited patiently to be returned to his usual and customary place in the niche in the front foyer.

In A Vase On Monday7

White Dutch Irises began blooming last week and I rescued a few on Friday ahead of the heavy rain that had been accurately forecast for Friday night and Saturday. They actually survived the rains fine outside, but these cut ones have lasted quite well indoors. I like their delicate lavender highlights and rich yellow throats.

In A Vase On Monday4 In A Vase On Monday5

There were not many types of flowers to choose from in my garden yesterday when it was time to set the table for our Easter dinner. Fortunately candytuft and johnny jump ups (Viola) were plentiful.

I collected and presented sprigs of them in tiny glasses to adorn the dinner table and used additional blooms to fill this small ceramic vase. This vase also holds the first cutting of Meadow Sage ‘May Night’ which started blooming late last week.

Candytuft, Viola and Meadow Sage

Candytuft, Viola and Meadow Sage

I placed the Dutch Irises into a special triangular glass vase, a gift from my daughter. The vase was made by a local artist using a stained glass technique. The smaller greenish-blue ceramic vase is nicely proportioned with a small neck, very useful in arranging delicate stemmed flowers. I bought it from a North Carolina potter at the Eno River Festival years ago.

In A Vase On Monday6

Materials List

Dutch Iris
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Viola (Johnny jump ups)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage), synonym Salvia × sylvestris ‘May Night’ (Meadow sage)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Visit her to enjoy what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Spring Assemblage

In A Vase On Monday-9Cathy’s weekly challenge entitled In A Vase On Monday encourages gardeners to create floral designs from materials gathered in our own gardens. Looking for inspiration late yesterday, after a cold, rainy and windy weekend, the grass squished under my feet while I gathered blooms and foliage from around the garden’s edges.

There were not large quantities of any one flower, but in the end I collected an adequate sampling of spring blossoms for Monday’s display.

White Narcissus ‘Thalia’ are only just beginning to open and a sole hyacinth escaped the winter’s chill.

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

For containers I selected four footed cordial glasses from a set of six, a well-loved and often-used wedding present from a dear friend. I also chose a small crystal vase that belonged to a maternal aunt.

In A Vase On Monday

To use as a feathery, airy filler I cut freshly emerging Achillea leaves. From a nearby container I also selected a few leaves of Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage) that had not been damaged by the rough weather.

Achillea leaves contrast with Muscari buds

Achillea leaves contrast with tight form of Muscari racemes

In foreground leaves of Salvia Dorada 'Aurea' (Golden Sage) merge with those of Iberis sempervirens

In foreground, leaves of Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage) merge with those of Iberis sempervirens

The vase holding the Thalia and several Tete-a-Tetes made a pleasant individual arrangement, with the daffodils hovering above a base of Iberis sempervirens.

Narcissus 'Thalia', Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus 'Thalia', Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’, Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Picked from the path of the meditation circle, purple violas with deep golden centers proved difficult to photograph, their rich dark color resisting the camera, but this image reflects the strong hue fairly accurately.

Violas

Violas

The grape hyacinths are extra small this year and scarce, but these few fan out to make a large impact when paired with Iberis.

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

Muscari and Iberis

I find the flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) so charming and I admire the pure white, creamy petals. Repeating Iberis among multiple vases ties the arrangements together.

Creamy white flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Creamy white flowers of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

It was fun to collect and disperse these spring flowers among a set of vases this Monday.

Materials List
Achillea x ‘Appleblossom’ (Yarrow)
Hyacinthus orientalis (Dutch hyacinth)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’
Narcissus ‘Thalia’
Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage)
Viola
crystal vase, acrylic doughnut-shaped stem holder, footed cordial glasses

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Enjoy visiting her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday. I am headed over there right now.

In A Vase On Monday— Narcissus and Tea

Petite Flower Arrangement

Petite Flower Arrangement

It is late in the day but forging ahead, once again I am joining Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday challenge. Today I assembled a group of petite flowers arranged among several pieces of my daughter’s childhood tea set.

Tea Party

I was not sure what would be blooming this week, but immediately following an ice storm we have finally had three gorgeous blue sky, sunny days that encouraged the Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ to begin blooming. Although I was reluctant to cut these first flowers, eventually I gathered the courage and collected a couple dozen daffodils. I filled a favorite ceramic vase for a quintessential example of spring.

But while I was collecting them I also came across the first little Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and nearby, an Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) showing a few open flowers.

Their dainty size appealed to me today, so I gathered them along with several sprigs of lavender and a single Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose).

Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete'

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’

Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' and Iberis

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and Iberis

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Despite my hesitation to cut the Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ I am enjoying them indoors after all. They are very fragrant. These have been growing in the garden for many years, but most of the flowers seem much smaller than in years past.

These bring smiles nevertheless.

Narcissus 'King Alfred' (trumpet daffodil)

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Thanks very much to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Visit her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday.