Tag Archives: clematis jackmanii

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

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Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Spiraea branches caught my attention last week and I decided to play with them again.

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

From the window overlooking the garden the aging leaves look deep orange, up close they range from golden to rust. For some reason the sections I cut are more uniform in color.

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

This variation of today’s design is closest to my original concept of featuring a nearly bare branch to explore rhythm and curves.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

It seemed to need more. In adding Wintergreen boxwood I fumbled the lichen-covered branch and never got it back into good position. Securing the materials in place would have saved extra work, but I opted to keep moving, taking the opportunity to experiment. In the end today’s designs are about process more than result.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

I do like this orange and purple pairing, marigold and lavender.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

The fragrance of lavender adds another layer to the pleasure of creating with flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

The lichen branch here is moved toward toward the back of the dish where it no longer works to counterbalance the rightmost stem of spirea. I decided that piece of spirea could be removed altogether.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

Also here an echinacea seedhead moved from front and center to the tip of the lichen branch. Offering interesting texture and color close-up, it did not have much impact to the overall design.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

The lichen branch had lost its purpose and effectiveness, so I removed it and the other lichen bits entirely.

In the next iteration a still green cutting of Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ sweeps out gracefully in this version. The originally favored bare branch of spiraea has been removed, simplifying the line. The spare quality here interests me and this is the stage I kept to display in the foyer.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

Originally I had planned to use a small companion arrangement, formed simply from a young Husker Red penstemon tucked into a small black holder. It did not add much until I came back to the mostly bare branch of spiraea.  Adding the tall stem changed the dynamics and energy once again.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

By moving the point of view slightly the composition shifts significantly.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

Ultimately I returned to a simplified version, replacing the quilted runner underneath with a white linen towel.

In A Vase On Monday – Variations

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Materials

Flowers
Lavender
Marigold

Foliage
Buxus microphylla var koreana ‘Wintergreen’ (Wintergreen boxwood)
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower), Seedhead
Lichen covered branch
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Container and Mechanics
Small black plastic Solo bowl – vase insert
3-inch florist’s frog (floral pin holder)
2-inch round holder with integrated florist’s frog
Black, green stones
Black glazed square
Quilted runner (made by my sister)

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and encouraging us to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

For weeks flowers from Hyacinth Sunrise Mix, newly planted this year, have been delightful. Last week I tried to use several hyacinths in an arrangement but the stems shredded apart. Determined to try again, I placed three quickly and firmly into a floral pin. With no rearranging and fussing this time the hyacinths stood fine, a lilac-colored one and two soft pale yellows.

Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ was the first flower collected for today’s vase but there was not enough to feature. Just mere wisps in the vase, its presence is enough to highlight the color of the lilac hyacinth.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

The first flowers of Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ opened this past week. Placed low and off-center it makes a perfect focal flower to accompany the hyacinths.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and newly opened Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ reiterate the purple hue of the clematis, and are placed to add height and width to the design.

Freshly emerging, new leaves of Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy) are tucked around the base of the container and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) add a bright pop of white.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Confection

This arrangement was designed to be viewed from the front but even from the back the appealing textures and colors of the April garden shine through.

Purple Confection – Back View

 

Materials

Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Hyacinth Sunrise Mix
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ (Woodland phlox)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage, Meadow sage)
Foliage
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Mechanics
Blue ceramic vase
3-inch florist’s frog

Here is one more look from the front.

Purple Confection – Back View

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

At a later hour than usual I join Cathy for the first time in 2017 with In A Vase On Monday. This is an opportunity to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

It rained all day on the first of January and today it rained harder. Finally around lunchtime the showers stopped but skies remained gray and oppressive.

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

I have been saving dried stems and seedheads of a Jackmanii clematis for a time when the garden might not offer any fresh blooms. This seemed like a good time to bring it out and highlight the curves, angles and twists of the vine and the soft, pinwheels formed after the flowering.

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

I imagined the clematis placed simply and starkly, nearly in silhouette. Then I decided to add to the design a dried hydrangea flower in a separate container. This worked ok but I felt a bit of fresh greenery would brighten the overall effect.

While outdoors selecting a  bit of fresh gardenia and lavender foliage I decided it would not hurt to take a quick garden inventory in case the anemone coronaria were blooming here as they were in Italy today. Unfortunately no, but a new flush of Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ flowers were there for the picking. Although I have used these often in the past two months, my enthusiasm for them reignited when greeted by their fragrance.

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

Very little of what I collected outside was needed for this arrangement so now there are vases of greenery and camellias scattered all over. More elaborate than initially imaged this design still is rather restrained. It brings together a touch of all seasons as we begin a new year of sharing vases.

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

Materials

Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ – late fall and winter
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ – spring and fall
Hydrangea macrophylla – summer
Foliage
Gardenia jasminoides – year-round
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender) – year-round
Mechanics
Glazed ceramic square dish
Black stones
Ikebana floral holders

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday - A Touch Of All Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – A Touch Of All Seasons

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

 

 

Post-Truth Gardening

[Because of the way I was brought up, I have to precede the next sentence with, “Not to brag, but…”] Not to brag, but after re-reading old entries and exploring photographs from the past year, I must say the 2016 garden was just beautiful.

For example, clematis ‘Jackmanii’ bloomed magnificently in spring and repeated in fall.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'-4

Irises trailed colorfully throughout the borders.

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Japanese Iris

Japanese Iris

Hydrangeas stood strong, camellias bloomed their hearts out.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Yet that my garden was successful had not been my perception this morning when I first started to reflect on the past gardening year. No, instead my mind leapt melodramatically to unfinished projects, battles with weeds, trees that died, despair at heat and drought or freezes and wet. I began to gear up to lament and apologize.  Why, I wonder, such a negative, emotional response?

I am struck by how my initial impression of having suffered through another twelve months unsuccessfully growing anything of interest clashes so distinctly with reality.

What changed my mind was taking time to browse the actual record set down in this blog, pbmGarden. I uncovered the truth about 2016 with its many wonderful gardening moments.

Narcissus 'Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

In a post-truth* gardening sort of way, too often I allow seeds that fail to germinate or vermin that eat away at roots of plants to become the news, to become the defining stories of any gardening year. In my case these examples are legitimate and real issues, not made-up ones: yes, the grass turned brown during the hottest part of summer, echinaceas flowers underwhelmed, again this autumn Lycoris radiata produced foliage only and no flowers.

But in balance these topics do not deserve to distort the record against success. Why is it frequently whenever anyone asked I mentioned in reply the negative influences affecting the garden. Was the underlying reason false modesty, not wanting to appear to be bragging about a rich, lush features. Perhaps it was trying to manage expectations so when finally viewed in person it would look better than it sounded. For whatever reason, through repetition of telling, by the end of the year I had internalized  that the entire garden had failed.

I am glad I looked back today.

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Though it may never be a showcase of great design, this little garden definitely has its moments. It suits my needs as an opportunity for dreams as well as for rational, reasonable and down-to-earth experimentation with plants. Modest as it is, I love it for its peaceful sensibility and for being a haven where songbirds thrive and gardenias scent the air, where sonorous notes resonate from chimes in the meditation circle.

Meditation Path

Meditation Path

Not each one of these nice things is noticeable every single day but the potential is always there for beauty, knowledge and amazement. I must keep that wisdom throughout the year, enjoying the garden as a place where hope continues to exist while the world passes through its inevitable and sometime ominous cycles.

In rejecting a post-truth reality I plan to dig deeper for authenticity, truth and honesty in the coming year.

*In a year marked by surreal outcomes in the US presidential election and the Brexit referendum, Oxford Dictionaries named “post-truth” 2016 word of the year. In a post-truth world reality is created and framed through the lens of emotional appeal rather than through intellectual discourse and honesty. The art of repeating talking points while ignoring contradictory evidence takes on more importance than truth and facts.


Originally I had planned to do a different type of garden review than this and perhaps I will write it in the upcoming week.  Meanwhile, thank you for being part of my gardening world. Good wishes for a Happy New Year!

2016 Carolina Inn Lunch

In A Vase On Monday—Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

As the week begins it is fun to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden as part of Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday feature.

Unassuming, small bits of color gathered from here and there are the mainstay of this week’s garden offerings.

Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ was the first flower chosen for today and its short stem dictated creating a design composed of other tiny ones. The Jackmanii clematis ventured a couple of blooms after Hurricane Hermine brought much needed rain.  I fit the red Nicky phlox and a clematis into a clear espresso cup, filling in with several stems of Verbena bonariensis (which shed heavily) and a sprig of Perennial Sweet Pea.

Phlox paniculata 'Nicky' and Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Overhead View. Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ and Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

The rain this week also helped revive the zinnias and marigolds which had been suffering under the late August sun, reason enough to fill a second cup. A small sprig of lavender and several stems of asclepias made agreeable companions.

Asclepias Overhead View - Asclepias tuberosa, Zinnia, Marigold, Zinnia, Marigold

Asclepias Overhead View – Asclepias tuberosa, Zinnia, Marigold, Zinnia, Marigold

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

Materials
Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Marigold
Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ (tall garden phlox)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’ (Burpee, popular cutting variety, 24” H)
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’ (Burpee, colorful huge 6’ Blooms, 24” H)
Zinnia elegans ‘Cactus Flower Blend’ (Botanical Interests, 4-6” wide, 2-3’H. Heirloom Twist and shout. Double and semi-double)
Riedel Espresso Crystal Cups/Saucers

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.