Tag Archives: chrysanthemum

Mid-December Color Notes And Miscellany

The pass-along chrysanthemum in my garden is mostly gone now. Each year it undergoes a striking color transition as it ages which never fails to interest me.

First, tight yellow buds open to these flowers with yellow centers and paler outer petals.

Chrysanthemum. Yellow buds give way to pale flowers with bright sunny centers. Nov 2, 2014.

Chrysanthemum. Yellow buds give way to pale flowers with bright sunny centers. Nov 2, 2014.

As the flower matures the yellow largely disappears from the petals.

Chrysanthemum, mostly white petals.

Chrysanthemum, mostly white petals.

The petals begin taking on a pink tinge as aging progresses.

Chrysanthemum With Tinge Of Pink

Chrysanthemum With Tinge Of Pink

Eventually the fading chrysanthemum transforms itself into a venerable lavender pink.

Chrysanthemum Aged to Pink

Chrysanthemum Aged to Pink

Despite a few frosts, December has been mild. This weekend’s highs will be 74°F/23°C, pleasant enough I should be able to finish up some bulb planting.

Anemone coronaria was one of the few successes in my garden last spring and early summer and, unsure how well they would do a second year, I bought a few more to add this fall (part of my weekend planting plans).

I am not sure if this is normal but as the summer heat receded the anemones, which had died back, began sending out new foliage and yesterday I even found a bud forming.

Anemone coronaria

Anemone coronaria

I hope this anemone has time to open.

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’

Some special friends and former neighbors, now living in California, surprised us this week with an unusual fruit gift, local Fuyu persimmons. Have you tried them? Neither my husband nor I had ever tasted a persimmon, so I did a bit of research before eating them.

It turns out there are two types, astringent and non-astringent. Fuyu persimmon is the non-astringent, meaning it does not cause your mouth to pucker and turn inside out if eaten before completely ripe. Reading that gave me confidence to taste them and oh, they were delicious, very difficult to describe except that, delicious. And beautiful.

Fuyu Persimmon

Fuyu Persimmon

Fuyu Persimmon

Fuyu Persimmon

Fuyu Persimmon

Fuyu Persimmon

In A Vase On Monday—Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday. And today Cathy is celebrating the second anniversary of creating and sharing arrangements each Monday. Congratulations Cathy and thanks as well!

This past week was wet, but unseasonably warm, so I was surprised at how chilly it was Sunday afternoon when I went out to the garden to gather flowers. Despite the rain chrysanthemums and camellias looked pristine.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Camellia sasanqua 'Hana-Jiman'

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

There were no fresh gardenias this week, instead an unexpected Iceberg rose was blooming.

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

Other usable odds and ends were scattered about, the last floral traces of summer: lantana, salvia, cosmos, coneflower, and zinnia. Aloft in a silver goblet the flowers mix and meld, a colorful composite of pink, yellow, blue, lavender, orange.

A Look From Above

A Look From Above

Zinnia, Saliva, Coneflower and Camellia

Zinnia, Saliva, Coneflower and Camellia

 

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Materials
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Chrysanthemum
Cosmos
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)
Lantana camara (Common lantana)
Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)
Rosa ‘Iceberg’
Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)
Zinnia
Gardenia foliage

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Aloft In A Silver Goblet

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—November Medley

In A Vase On Monday - View From Above

In A Vase On Monday – View From Above

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

There was a light rain yesterday when I gathered a few flowers for today’s vase. For the past week I have been keeping tabs on a favorite pass-along Chrysanthemum. I have grown this plant for at least two decades and am always pleased when its soft buttery yellow flowers return.

Passalong Chrysanthemum

Passalong Chrysanthemum

I decided to make these small button-shaped chrysanthemum the focus of the arrangement, but then some other flowers caught my attention.

Nearby were a couple of pink Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow). They bloomed off and on during the summer and have just begun another round. I found a single red zinnia to include today also.

In A Vase On Monday - View From Above

In A Vase On Monday – View From Above

The outdoor display from this year’s Camellia sasanquas is outstanding and I could not resist cutting a few. Despite the rain they were in good condition. I envisioned the yellow centers and pinky-white petals of Hana-Jiman camellia coordinating with the pink yarrow and yellow chrysanthemums.

Camellia sasanqua 'Hana-Jiman' and Chrysanthemum

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and Chrysanthemum

Camellia sasanqua 'Hana-Jiman'

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

With only a few gardenias blooming this week I wanted to include them again while I could.

Gardenia

Gardenia

I used florist’s foam in a small plastic dish to hold the arrangement. I started by placing the chrysanthemums as outlines for the overall shape. This type of formal design always takes more material than I think it will.

It quickly became obvious more flowers were needed, so I headed back into the rain for a few more camellias and gardenia foliage to fill out the spherical design.

All along I had planned to display the flowers atop an urn-shaped container. While working I thought I was being careful to conceal the plastic dish with foliage, but once I set the flowers in place it was obvious the lower edges needed additional concealer material.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Outdoors it was still raining, so I decided to change course and try out several shallow containers. This blue and brown pottery bowl worked well.

Camellia sasanqua 'Hana-Jiman' and Chrysanthemum

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and Chrysanthemum

Finally I settled on a delicate blue and white porcelain dish for the final display.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Camellia sasanqua 'Hana-Jiman' and Chrysanthemum

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and Chrysanthemum

 

Materials

Flowers
Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow)
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Chrysanthemum
Gardenia jasminoides
Zinnia

Foliage
Gardenia jasminoides

Mechanics
Floral foam
6-inch plastic Lomey dish
Various containers

In A Vase On Monday - View From Above

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—A Trio Of Rescues

 

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Each Monday brings an opportunity to join in Cathy’s weekly challenge called In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials collected from the garden.

The temperature fell slightly below freezing overnight for the first time this fall. The garden seems fine this mooring, but yesterday with weather warnings in mind I rescued flowers for today’s vase and ended up with three informal arrangements.

Most of the 16 red snapdragons purchased on sale for $.25 apiece October 3, 2014 are flowering in one small section of the meditation path. It will be interesting to see how well they do over the winter. With luck they should bloom again in early spring.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) In Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) In Meditation Circle

Bought at the same time as the snapdragons, a red dahlia hybrid with no name is full of buds. This one flower managed to open so far, making it worth the $1.00 I paid for the plant.

Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

 

I am fairly new to growing dahlias so am not sure how the cold will affect them this week, but the temperatures will be much warmer the next few days and I hope they continue to bloom a while longer. Last week a friend Libby passed along some heirloom tubers from another red dahlia her mother used to grow. I am so looking forward to seeing it bloom next year (thanks Libby!).

The snapdragons and dahlia went into the spherical turquoise vase my sisters gave me last spring.

Turquoise vase of Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Turquoise vase of Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

The flowers on my passalong Chrysanthemum starting showing color mid-October and are now in full-bloom. They are a rich yellow in bud, but the outer petals become nearly white as they open. I try pinching the stems back to make the plant behave better, but each fall this plants ends up sprawling in its own lovely way.

I used a small blue matte-glazed vase to hold the chrysanthemums. A stem of Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea) foliage lifts the arrangement vertically, while a single Pelargonium leaf anchors the design.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

A few sprigs of dark purple salvia provide contrast to the yellow blossoms.

Chrysanthemums and May Night Salvia

There were enough Chrysanthemums left over to easily fill another vase.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Chrysanthemum
Dahlia x hybrida
Salvia × sylvestris ‘May Night’ (Meadow sage)

Foliage and Pods
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
‘Carolina Sapphire’ Arizona Cypress
Pelargonium (Geranium)

In A Vase On Monday - A Trio Of Rescues

In A Vase On Monday – A Trio Of Rescues

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday. Perhaps you will be inspired to share your own vase.

In A Vase On Monday—Blue Mist With Vermilion

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Mist With Vermilion

Each Monday brings an opportunity to join in Cathy’s weekly challenge called In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials collected from the garden.

Early this morning I gathered a variety of plants to create a formal arrangement, but time seems to be evaporating today, so I will save that idea for another time. Instead I am sharing a loosely arranged design that practically assembled itself when I was placing the flowers in water for conditioning.

The main focal flowers are sprigs of blue, fuzzy-headed Conoclinium coelestinum and stems of vermilion-hued Chrysanthemum. Off to one side sits a scarlet Dahlia ‘Blue Bell’ flower in a small pewter vase. The strong colors seem appropriate for early autumn.

Conoclinium coelestrium (Blue Mist Flower) and Chrysanthemum

Conoclinium coelestrium (Blue Mist Flower) and Chrysanthemum

Conoclinium coelestinum, also known as Blue Mistflower or Hardy Ageratum, is native to eastern United States and attracts butterflies to the garden. It has been blooming for several weeks and should continue well into fall. The Blue Mistflower and the Chrysanthemum come back reliably every year without any attention.

A couple of leaves from Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’  add a heart-shaped foliage accent. Several stems of Perovskia atriplicifolia extend loosely outward, repeating the color of the Blue Mistflower. A slender, flowering stalk of Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells) added a vertical element to the vase.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Both containers used in today’s arrangement are special treasures received many years ago. The little pewter vase was a bridesmaid’s gift from a college friend and is engraved with the date of her wedding. The footed, cut glass vase originally held a sunshiny bouquet of daffodils, a spring token from another friend. The vases are extremely versatile and I have reached for them over and over again to hold small to medium-sized flowers.

Materials
Conoclinium coelestinum (Blue Mistflower, Hardy Ageratum)
Dahlia ‘Blue Bell’
Chrysanthemum sp.
Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not)
Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – April 2014

Northern Border View Facing West

Northern Border View Facing West

Yesterday was Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides. Though it will be a day late I want to join in the monthly focus on foliage as early spring is a time of year when I especially enjoy the foliage in my garden.

Spring marks a joyful point in an incredible cycle of nature, one I experience with new wonder each year. Fresh growth and tender green hues rejuvenate my gardener’s spirit as the perennials emerge and the borders transform from mostly soil to mostly plants.

The northern border has filled in seemingly overnight after some nice warm days. Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint), trimmed heavily a few weeks ago to remove last year’s growth, makes a nice low plant for the front edge of the border. This border is filled with Iris germanica (Bearded iris), Iris sibirica (Siberian Iris) and Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris).

Nepeta 'Walker's Low' (Catmint) and Iris in Northern Border

Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) and Iris in Northern Border (looking toward west)

Below and to the right of the catmint is a path with a patch of mixed sedum. The sedum overwinters well and I will soon be relocating much of it to the devil’s strip between the sidewalk and street in front of our house where grass does not like to grow. (Architectural Review Board application was approved.)

Mixed Sedum

Mixed Sedum

In my garden there are lots of silvery leaved plants. I enjoy the color and texture of these Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) and Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) and especially in early spring the Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood) is beautiful.

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) and Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) and Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Creeping Lemon Thyme overwintered in this pot along the southern side path. Stems of Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) is aggressively exploring this bed.

Creeping Lemon Thyme and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Creeping Lemon Thyme and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Planted last spring Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William) promises to perform better this year. It is looking vigorous, unlike last year.

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

A generous patch of woody-stemmed Chrysanthemum is a welcome sight, a pass-along plant from my garden mentor many years ago.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ will reach 6 feet tall but for now it makes a large clump of green near the gate of the southern entrance. I need to find time to divide this.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

To the right of the rudbeckia, just as the path turns the corner toward the gate to the main garden, sits a Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ loaded with buds after a heavy pruning in late winter.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Visit Christina at Garden of the Hesperides to see what foliage she is highlighting this month and find links to other participants.

Rainy Sunday Musings

Warm and Sunny Friday

Two days ago the weather could  not have more different from today, as Friday was sunny and mild and today is not. The temperature Friday reached the high 70s, not high enough to set a record, but warm enough to beckon everyone to get outside. On that day we took in a lunch-time stroll around the nearby Botanical Garden (NCBG).

All fall at the Botanical Garden I have admired a large planting of Ilex verticillata (Common Winterberry). The display of red berries has been very bright and long-lived.

Ilex verticillata (Common Winterberry) at NCBG

Ilex verticillata (Common Winterberry) at NCBG

The other thing that caught my attention that day at NCBG was an eastern North American native that reminded me of my childhood when Clark’s Teaberry chewing gum was popular. The plant is Gaultheria procumbens (Eastern Teaberry). It is a low-growing evergreen with a wintergreen scent.

Gaultheria procumbens (Eastern Teaberry)  Gaultheria procumbens (Eastern Teaberry)-2

Earlier Friday, I had ventured out in my own garden with the camera looking for flowers. I found very little blooming but I did notice the last vestiges of the pass-along Chrysanthemums. How can it be that this flower could begin in November sporting yellow centers with pale white petals, yet as always, end up pink.

Nov 1, 2013

Nov 1, 2013

Dec 6, 2013

Dec 6, 2013

I have obviously sited the Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’  (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea) in the wrong place. Trying to give it shade, it is tucked in so close to the fence between gardenias and behind a large spirea that it is mostly invisible until I happen right up on it.  Maybe that is not so bad to have a nice surprise. This little Ruby Slippers seems to be growing well and lives up to its promise of colorful foliage.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)-2 Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Last winter I ordered several kinds of Anemone coronaria and they were very late shipping. It was already very hot by their arrival time. Soon after I planted the bulbs I resigned myself they had all died, but I came across a few survivors Friday. Planted here are ‘The Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’ and it will be exciting to see them bloom next spring (if in fact that’s what these are).

Anemone coronaria de Caen 'The Bride' and 'Mr. Fokker' -2 Anemone coronaria de Caen 'The Bride' and 'Mr. Fokker'

Today

There was a chance of frozen rain today but we seemed to have missed it, with the temperature hovering at 34-35°F. The rain portion of the prediction was accurate.

Most of the day I have been sipping coffee and watching birds take turns at the feeders through the cold drizzle. There was so much activity at early morning that I took advantage of a momentary break in the rainfall to top off the seeds in the feeders.

Colorful red cardinals are equally beautiful against the green of junipers or against the brown stems of spirea or gray branches of dogwood. At mid-morning a pair of Eastern Bluebirds join in. A couple of Blue Jays showed up for a while, but did not dominate the feeders as I had expected.

Finding an opening, White-breasted Nuthatches, Carolina Chickadees, Black-capped Chickadees, and Dark-eyed Juncos flit in to quickly grab a seed. Northern Flickers and Towhees peck through the underbrush of browned stalks and stems—remnants of perennials left around for winter.

Their pace has not slowed all day.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’