Tag Archives: camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

In A Vase On Monday—Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

Finally in full bloom in the southwestern border, hellebores were the starting inspiration for today’s arrangement.  These are not the ones recently purchased at the hellebore farm, but were passed along from Vicki, a yoga and garden club friend, about five years ago.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Growing on the north side of the house Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ is full of flowers and plenty of fat buds promise many more. One branch of this camellia was included to add color interest and serve as a focal point.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

A redbud twig and five or six stems of spiraea were selected to add height and movement to the design. Both of these springtime favorites burst into blossom just in the past couple of days.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Added as a last minute impulse, bright yellow from a trio of Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ lifts the arrangement and ties the other flowers together.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

I grabbed a cranberry-colored glass vase just to hold the hellebores while they were being conditioned, but ended up sticking with it. Not only is the vase a perfect size, but the dark red brings an unexpected element of drama to the spring assortment.

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Cranberry red glass vase

On yesterday’s gray afternoon there was little light for picture-taking in the dining room where I moved the arrangement for display. The flowers will brighten up our meals this week (if we eat indoors! Last week we had most meals on the screened porch enjoying the birds and the view of the awakening garden.)

In A Vase On Monday - Spring Assortment

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Assortment

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—April Allure

 

In A Vase On Monday - April Allure

In A Vase On Monday – April Allure

Late on this April afternoon I am joining Cathy for In A Vase On Monday, a weekly challenge to fill a vase using materials gathered from one’s garden.

I wondered all weekend what might work in a vase for today, knowing blue-violet Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ would be my first choice. I had not imagined finding such a large and varied collection of blooms as I did. These flowers inspired me to create a formal classic round design.

Anemone coronaria 'Mr. Fokker'

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Camellia x 'Koto-no-kaori'

Camellia x ‘Koto-no-kaori’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Narcissus 'Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

For this week’s container I affixed floral foam to a 6-inch shallow plastic dish. Once the design was completed the shallow dish was placed atop the actual vase. The cream-colored ceramic urn, imprinted with “Vintage 4,” lends a traditional flair to the design and the extra height helps provide proper proportion.

The arrangement is held in a small shallow dish.

The arrangement is held in a small shallow dish.

 

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

I am happy with the arrangement, although there are always things to tweak. After seeing photographs of the arrangement I realize too many of the flowers are vying to become the focal point, taking away the emphasis from Mr. Fokker. I really like the pure bright white of the Thalia daffodil, Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and spiraea, and think it would help the balance of the design to bring the white further down toward the base. I like the green tones of the older hellebores, serving almost as foliage, while the fresher pinkish ones echo the hue of the camellias.

It is wonderful to have enough flowers for a mixed arrangement this week. Spring is welcome to hang around a while.

Materials

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
Camellia x ‘Koto-no-kaori’
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Buxus microphylla var koreana ‘Wintergreen’ (Wintergreen boxwood)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – December 2014

Seed pods of Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Seed pods of Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Today is the Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. Arrival time in pbmGarden is 6:03 PM EST.

Tomorrow is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides. In anticipation I walked around the garden with the camera in late morning, when the air was quite chilly and the sky, quite gray and dull. Later the sun peeked out.

The Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) lost its leaves long ago but the seed pods still provide a bit of interest and an interesting coloration on the bark of the Crape Myrtle’s trunk set my imagination to wandering.

Intriguing mark on trunk of Crape Myrtle.

Intriguing mark on trunk of Crape Myrtle.

The screening hedge of five Juniperus chinensis ‘Blue Point’ has grown considerably this year. I like the height, but not the shape of these trees and how to prune them properly is a mystery to me.

Juniperus chinensis 'Blue Point' (Blue Point Juniper)

Juniperus chinensis ‘Blue Point’ (Blue Point Juniper)

Last December the junipers were decorated for the holiday season, but not yet this year. This picture is from last year’s GBFD post.

Juniperus chinensis 'Blue Point' (Blue Point Juniper)

Juniperus chinensis ‘Blue Point’ (Blue Point Juniper).  Lavender is in left foreground.

The small Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ in the Western border continues holding on to its rich fall color.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Some of the gardenia hedge is not doing well along the Western border where many bushes never recovered from the deep cold last winter. A couple are looking fairly green, but others look miserable. I read it is possible to cut them to the ground to rejuvenate them and may give it a try for those worst affected.

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

This Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’ is doing well.

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

This Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’ needs rejuvenation.

In the meditation circle many Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) have volunteered. I keep moving them around into different areas of the garden. The foliage stays colorful and healthy through most of the winter.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

When we moved here the front foundation shrubs were underplanted with a row of Liriope spicata (creeping lilyturf). This spreads by runners and is a difficult plant to remove or even contain but it does have attractive fruit this year.

Liriope spicata (creeping lilyturf)

Liriope spicata (creeping lilyturf)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) is nearing the end of its usefulness for 2014. I really like its early green florets and enjoy watching it move from pink to dark red. I have left its browned flowers alongs with many other plants for birds.

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude)

This sedum maintains a brighter, more colorful presence in the garden. It is Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina Stonecrop). Most of it is yellow, but some tips are bright pink.

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina Stonecrop)

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina Stonecrop)

On the north side of the house this camellia hybrid is full of buds. An unusually cold winter kept this from blooming last year so I hope 2015 will be kinder to it. Its green leathery leaves are glossy and attractive year-round.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Thanks to Christina for hosting the GBFD review. Visit her to see what foliage she and others are featuring this month.

In A Vase On Monday—Drifts Of Color

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday challenge encourages gardeners to create floral designs from materials gathered in our own gardens each week.

Today my display features Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’. This shrub has been full of rich, promising buds this year, but since early March, just as the flowers begin opening they are marred by unfriendly cold or rain, even ice. But I found a few blooms in good enough condition yesterday to share them.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-4

Planted nearby the camellia, Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose) remain unfazed by winter’s tricks. Since there were not many camellias untouched by the weather, I decided the Helleborus might pair well as floating companions to the camellias, despite almost jarring color contrasts.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-6

No floral mechanics or special techniques were required in constructing today’s design.

I gently cut the stems very short and dropped the blossoms into an Italian glass dish filled with fresh, cool water. Growing up, many a special meal would be served at my house alongside colorful camellia blooms in clear glass bowls. Hellebores were a much later discovery.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The slightest movement against the glass causes the flowers to rearrange themselves. I like the free floating results as the blossoms shift and drift.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-3

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Visit her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday