Tag Archives: Arum Italicum

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens. December gifts are those special wonders one finds in the landscape this time of year.

Yesterday a friend mentioned some of her hellebores are already full of buds so I though I might find some to feature today. None were available but I did harvest some of the hellebores’ young, tender, pale green foliage, along with some lovely patterned leaves of Arum italicum and a few stems of fresh aquilegia greenery.

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

The red and black container is from my collection of five red and black raku pots by North Carolina potter, Charles Chrisco. I inserted a tall drinking glass into the vase to help hold and support the stems without using floral foam.

The foliage took no time to set in place. With the dynamic shape and texture of the arum, the green materials could have stood alone if necessary. There is very little blooming now so the choices were chrysanthemums (fading), Erysimum (scarce), or sasanqua camellias (best potential).

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

Many readers have been enamored of this red Yuletide camellia when I have used it in the past. It has been a prolific bloomer this year. The weather has not been too severe yet so many of the flowers were in good condition this morning.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Of the two sasanquas in my garden I favor the more fragrant and delicate looking Hana-Jiman. It blooms earlier though than Yuletide and is nearly finished for another year.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

The camellias cooperated without much struggle and I was satisfied with the result. I snapped one portrait in the kitchen before moving the arrangement to the foyer to catch the natural light of early morning.

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

Materials

Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Foliage
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Arum italicum
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Container
Red/black raku vase, Charles Chrisco, Chrisco’s Pottery

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

A black and white view is always instructive. This one is from overhead.

In A Vase On Monday – December Gifts

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and encouraging our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Yuletide and Green

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

As the week begins I join Cathy with In A Vase On Monday, an opportunity to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

Freezing rain overnight left Saturday’s morning glazed in ice. It melted quickly and Sunday’s temperatures rose to 70 F. I took advantage of the mild day to complete the long overdue task of planting 5 new camellias purchased at last month’s garden club meeting. And I added 12 more snapdragons to the meditation circle—not quite enough to go around.

Before heavy rains could move in on Sunday afternoon, I searched the garden high and low for flowers and there was only one choice. Since mid-November Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ has been the mainstay of my Monday arrangements. Many of its blossoms had been darkened by the cold, but I was able to gather a few fresh ones to include in this week’s penultimate vase of 2016.

The starting point for the arrangement is Arum italicum, which has been beautiful this fall. The plant’s leaf shape and surface pattern create a perfect foliage feature for floral designs.  I placed the arum mostly to the left and back.

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

On the right I inserted a pale-green hydrangea cluster that has been drying indoors for most of the summer.

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

Lastly, the camellias were added as focal flowers.  The vase is the new Ikebana one I used several weeks ago.

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

Materials

Arum italicum
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Hydrangea, dried

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

It is always such a pleasure to put together a weekly vase. Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday - Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday – Yuletide And Green

In A Vase On Monday—February In Royal Blue

In A Vase On Monday - February In Royal Blue

In A Vase On Monday – February In Royal Blue

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

Sunday was 70°F and in the main garden sun melted away the last stubborn patch of snow from the previous weekend. Though there are bulbs springing up everywhere the garden looks exhausted.

A couple of stems of hellebore combined with arum and ilex foliage were the only potential vase materials to catch my eye during a morning inspection. Supplementing them are a fresh set of white and red blooms from indoor pots of cyclamen.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

A royal blue goblet lends a punch of unpredictability.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Materials
Arum italicum
Cyclamen
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Ilex crenata (Japanese holly)
Ikebana Kenzan (floral pin frog)

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

It is helpful to study the design in black and white. This is the same image as above.

Study in black and white

Study in black and white

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Arum and Poinsettia

In A Vase On Monday - Arum and Poinsettia

In A Vase On Monday – Arum and Poinsettia

Monday brings an opportunity to practice flower design by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday to create an arrangement from materials gathered in one’s own garden.

Actually, as it was raining cats and dogs this morning, I did not venture into the garden for materials. Instead I repurposed several long-lasting items from previous arrangements.

Arum italicum foliage used in a vase early in December still looks very green and healthy. I chose one of the strongly patterned leaves to practice leaf manipulation. I started by making parallel cuts within one side of the leaf, removing every other strip. My mat knife blade proved too dull for this task, cutting but also bruising the leaf. I changed course and cut out selective sections of the pattern, using scissors and even a thumb nail.

Precision is important in this type of work, but I was impatient with it. The end result suffered because I quickly bored of the process and did not take time I should have to get nice clean cuts.  Also, perhaps the Arum leaf is not particularly appropriate for this technique. (Aspidistra leaves are among the frequently recommended choices.)

Abandoning plans for manipulating more leaves, I inserted the Arum leaf into a small pin holder.

Manipulated Arum Leaf

Manipulated Arum Leaf

 

Manipulated Arum Leaf

Manipulated Arum Leaf

To hide the mechanics I wrapped a length of Tradescantia pallida  (purple heart) leaf around the base of the pin holder. This purple heart was used in a Monday vase in September and had been living in a little glass of water ever since.

Leaf of Tradescantia pallida  (purple heart) wrapped around the pin holder

Leaf of Tradescantia pallida (purple heart) wrapped around the pin holder

Though I did not grow it, a poinsettia holiday gift gave me easy access to a bright red bloom  and a few dark leaves to complete today’s design.

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

Arum and Poinsettia

This was a good experiment. I like the arrangement despite the crudeness of my work manipulating the leaf. There are many other techniques such as folding and weaving that I plan to experiment with sometime.

In A Vase On Monday - Arum and Poinsettia

In A Vase On Monday – Arum and Poinsettia

Materials List

Euphorbia pulcherrima (Poinsettia)
Arum italicum
Tradescantia pallida  (purple heart), formerly Setcreasea pallida

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum and Yarrow

In A Vase On Monday-Arum and Yarrow

Today I am joining Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday that encourages garden bloggers to create fresh arrangements each Monday using materials found in our gardens.

November has been really cold here, but warmer temperatures on Sunday afternoon made foraging for vase materials a pleasant experience.

Despite the fact most of the garden has succumbed to recent freezes a single pink yarrow, a few sasanqua flowers and tiny violas were waiting to be chosen.

 

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

 

 

 

 

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

When first brought indoors the collection looked like a motley crew of mixed sizes and limited possibilities, but the interesting part of preparing a vase each week is seeing the personality of the blossoms and leaves emerge.

This week, Arum leaves provided a bold starting point and the other items seemed to fit seamlessly after that.

 

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

Arum italicum

Arum italicum

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Arum italicum and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

In A Vase On Monday-Arum Magic

 

I like the effect of pairing chartreuse sedum with the blue violas. The yarrow vase is my favorite individual arrangement, but it was fun moving the three vases around and experimenting with how they related to each other.

Materials

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow)
Viola
Sedum
Arum italicum

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday. Perhaps you will be inspired to share your own vase.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – October 2012

It is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) and here are some examples of the variety of foliage in the October garden.

Strongly patterned leaves of Arum Italica are maturing this month in a shady spot under the camellias.

Arum italicum

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge) has been growing in a large pot on the patio since spring and is my first and only Euphorbia success.   It needs to go into the ground soon. Having never reached this point before I am not sure how well it will overwinter.

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) has been expanding its territory recently and has sent up shoots among the Sweet Alyssum, a dainty annual. At this height the lime-green young leaves add nice textural contrast to the tiny white flowers of the Alyssum and they are nicely fragrant.

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) and Lobularia hybrid ‘Snow Princess’ (Sweet Alyssum)

Autumn leaf color has become quite noticeable only in the last five days. The complementary hues found in this leafy pair added a touch of boldness to the garden this week. This particular tree has been an underwhelming performer, but in general, Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood) is beautiful in spring and fall.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Gentle mounds of Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) fill part of a border near the back steps. Round-lobed leaves range in color from pale green to a coppery russet pink, accentuated by dark red stems.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine), Salvia splendens (Scarlet Sage)

Purchased on a whim because they were on sale, three new trees were added this month in front of a south-facing portion of privacy fence. Online resources describe Juniperus scopulorum ‘Wichita Blue’ (Juniper) as having a pyramidal form; however, these seemed very narrow at the store, which is what I liked about them. Also, the plant tags appear to have understated the final height and width, and oops, it may not tolerate heat and humidity very well.  I believe I could find a lesson in all this—instead I planted them anyway.

At least the foliage has an interesting texture and is soft, not bristly nor prickly.

Juniperus scopulorum ‘Wichita Blue’ (Juniper)

Thanks to Christina of Creating My Own Garden of the Hesperides for hosting Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) each month.

Italian Arum. Surprise!

Protected and somewhat obscured by a gardenia, an Italian Arum thrives. Though not obvious at first, it sits tucked away under the large shrub, awaiting discovery from a passer-by.

The hastate or arrow-shaped leaves of Arum italicum (Italian Arum) add textural interest this time of year. The shiny deep green leaves, accentuated by light, vein-like markings, emerged in early fall (October) and remained evergreen all winter.

The garden was new and had very little shade when this plant was first added, so the arum was sited on the northern side of the house in a narrow strip along the foundation. For a couple of years it made a nice companion plant to a large clump of hostas, filling in when the hostas died back each year. The hostas are long gone (taken by drought, not deer, surprisingly) and the now mature foundation shrubs fully occupy the slender space.

I had planned to divide the Italian Arum this year and move some into the main garden where it might be more noticeable, to create a more effective display. In researching today how to divide Italian Arum I have learned that would not be wise. Unfortunately this plant is not native, rather it comes from Africa, Asia and Europe. It is listed as invasive in some parts of the U.S., including the nearby state of Virginia. Some North Carolina gardeners report Italian Arum as extremely difficult to eradicate and warn against planting it.

So this started out as a post about the surprise of coming upon a lovely and unusual plant such as Arum Italicum in the garden. It was supposed to end this way:

The arum certainly is fun where it exists now, lending that element of the unexpected. Walking by its hiding place, missing it at first, then glimpsing it at last and noticing its amazing surprise of shape and pattern, one is reminded of the joy plants can bring.

Arum Italicum (Italian Arum) held an even bigger garden surprise than I knew. This plant has always behaved well in this garden but if its seeds can spread and cause problems, I will have to seek some expert help for clarification and advice.

Meanwhile at least Arum Italicum did provide an opportunity to learn the word hastate:

Hastate, spear-shaped (hastata): Pointed, with barbs, shaped like a spear point, with flaring pointed lobes at the base
“Leaf shape.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.. Dec 2011. Web. 1 Feb 2012.