Tag Archives: Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

In A Vase On Monday – Mother’s Day

In A Vase On Monday – Mother’s Day

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Yesterday was Mother’s Day in the United States. I am fortunate to be mother to a strong, talented and beautiful-inside-and-out daughter who makes life joyful. My own lovely mother died while I was in college. I spent some bittersweet moments this weekend perusing old photographs of her and missing her sweet smile, as well as remembering many other women–aunts, sisters, friends and neighbors–who played such important roles in my life and continued sharing their kindnesses and wisdom with my daughter. One such person was Mama’s older cousin Virgie who shared her plants and passed along her love of flowers. The everlasting sweet pea, the old-fashioned rose and the Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) all came from Virgie’s garden many years ago (and probably the lamb’s ear).

In A Vase On Monday – Mother’s Day

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Verbena bonariensis and Lamb’s Ear

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ was my first peony. It hasn’t bloomed well the past several years and now has only four or five buds. This one flower opened confidently and spread outwards of eight inches.

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Snapdragons purchased last fall have added a brilliant pop of color to the south-facing border. In today’s vase this ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ helps break up the pinky pinkiness  of the arrangement.

Dianthus and Snapdragon

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket Mix’ (Snapdragon)
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)
Dianthus Ideal Select Mix
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)
Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)
Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Rosa (Old-fashioned passalong)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Foliage
Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)
Vase
Black Matte Dish With Red Interior

By the way, Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ lasted only a couple days in last week’s arrangement. The big surprise was how short-lived the baptisia would be as a cut flower. The entire array of baptisia stems were bare also after a couple days. The remaining flowers continued to thrive throughout the week.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Purple Smoke baptisia was the starting point for today’s vase.  It grows outside of the main fenced garden and its flowers usually have been stripped away by now, presumably by deer.

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

‘Purple Smoke’ (B. australis x B. alba) is a shrubby perennial which typically grows 3-4.5′ tall. It was discovered as a chance seedling in a trial bed at the North Carolina Botanical Garden in the early 1990s. Features smoky violet, lupine-like flowers (from B. australis) and gray-green, clover-like foliage on charcoal stems (from B. alba).  [ “Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke.'” Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed May 3, 2020.]

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Purple Smoke was discovered by Rob Gardener, late curator of the North Carolina Botanical Gardens here in Chapel Hill and was introduced by Niche Gardens, also of Chapel Hill.  (Sadly  Niche Gardens closed in October 2019.) Kim Hawks, former owner and  founder of Niche Gardens, is known for other introductions, including ‘Kim’s Knee High’ echinacea and Phlox paniculata ‘Robert Poore.’

Last fall’s snapdragons are mostly white or salmon, but one yellow opened up this week. I thought it would be a good foil to the baptisia.

Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket Mix’ (Snapdragon)

Several of you were surprised to see Clematis ‘Niobe’ in last week’s arrangement.  I am happy to report the clematis lasted all week.  I have had other clematis cuttings fade quickly in arrangements, so I don’t know why that one did so well.  Hope Jackmanii will also make it for a few days.

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

The irises are having a good year, but I have lost a number of my passalongs from the late 70s.

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

Iris (Passalong)

Some heavy rains came just as Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’ began to peak, leaving many of the flowers bent to the ground.  There are a few more buds and I just stashed 4 in the refrigerator to bring out in a few weeks.

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

I hesitated to introduce pink into this vase but Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’ is looking fine this week.  It has very few flowers for some reason, perhaps from being a bit close and overshadowed by Festiva Maxima.

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket Mix’ (Snapdragon)
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)
Iris hybrid
Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’
Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’
Foliage
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)
Vase
Black Matte Dish With Red Interior

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

In A Vase On Monday – Purple Smoke

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

As April ends, so does my Coral Charm Peony, which had a good run this year but wind and rain got the best of it Friday morning. After the other flowers dropped their petals, two final buds opened later Friday so I am able to salute this lovely peony and remember it until next year.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

I paired the coral peony with a red clematis that is performing well this spring, tucking in a few more bits of color for good measure with the help of snapdragon and thrift.

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)
Armeria pseudarmeria ‘Ballerina Lilac’ (Thrift)
Clematis ‘Niobe’
Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)
Foliage
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Peony leaves
Vase
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Triangle Black Wave (6.5 W x 6.5 L x 2H)

In A Vase On Monday – April Melody

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

In A Vase On Monday – April’s Mixed Bouquet

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Coral Charm Peony opened last week and how I wish  I could encourage it to be patient: “Take your time beautiful flowers.” One of seven buds opened, followed immediately by the other six at once.  The effect is breathtaking and although I usually I do not mind cutting flowers to bring indoors, I could bear to yield just one for today’s vase.

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima,’ loaded with buds, offered up two more large flowers.

With this elegant beginning the garden then beckoned “choose me, choose me!”   Irises, roses, snapdragons all sang out.

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet White’ (Snapdragon)
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)
Iris germanica ‘Immortality’
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Iris Tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)
Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)
Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’
Rosa (old-fashioned family passalong rose)
Foliage
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Penstemon Digitalis ‘Husker Red’
Peony leaves
Vase
Red/black raku vase, Charles Chrisco, Chrisco’s Pottery

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Virgie was my mother’s first cousin and she shared her love of gardening and lots of plants with me over the years. Her passalong rose is blooming this week and it seemed destined to feature in today’s vase.

When I began photographing the arrangement the heuchera leaf front and center at the lip of the vase seemed much too dark; I added a white snapdragon so it would not leave a black hole.  Later I decided I liked the balance of the other flowers without that central snapdragon.  Now I cannot decide so thought I would show both ways. The top two images show the original design and these next two show the modified one with the additional snapdragon.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Accompanying the roses is a branch of Flowering Dogwood. Dogwood is native to North Carolina and serves as our state flower.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Other white flowers include a late blooming narcissus, whose name I wish I knew, and the aforementioned snapdragon, Speedy Sonnet White.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

A few pink and red dianthus were added for accent and texture.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

As concealer foliage I used young leaves of Big Top Bronze Heuchera with their reddish undersides, along with spring green fern-like tansy leaves (one is visible in the upper right corner).

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet White’ (Snapdragon)
Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)
Dianthus Ideal Select Mix
Narcissus
Rose
Foliage
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Vase
Ceramic Urn Stamped “Vintage 4”

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

Quick Autumn Color

Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)

Remember the TV show where a contestant was given the chance to choose and keep as many items as she could shove into a shopping cart in just one minute? That is how I felt Tuesday when I stopped in at a favorite garden center, Southern States, while my husband waited in the car.

I have grown some snapdragons from seeds for the first time, but was looking for the immediate gratification of fully blooming plants.

Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)

I took the last Erysimum on the shelf. I grew ‘Sugar Rush Red’ once before and it did well for a couple of years.

Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Red’ (Wallflower)

I have not planted pansies in recent years, though a few pop up in springtime from past lives. These will be bright and cheery and the white dianthus will make a nice companion.

Ultima Radiance Lilac Pansy (Viola x wittrockiana)

At the end of five minutes my cart was full and I had to rush on. Sometimes you can buy a little happiness.

Corona™ White Dianthus (Dianthus chinensis)
Ultima Radiance Lilac Pansy (Viola x wittrockiana)
Sorbet® XP White Viola (Viola cornuta) Common Name : Horned Violet
Sorbet® XP True Blue Viola (Viola cornuta) Common Name : Horned Violet
Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Red’ (Wallflower)
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet White’ (Snapdragon)
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet Bronze’ (Snapdragon)
Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket Mix’ (Snapdragon)

On The Run Purchases

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement every Monday using materials collected from our gardens. I visited my sisters Saturday and was delighted to bring home three stems of their hydrangeas, just coming into flower.  Sadly the cut flowers wilted on the trip and I could not revive them, so I had to look for something else.

In their stead this week is a simple bowl of peonies.

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

After featuring bundles of peonies last Monday my plan was to seek something else to highlight today. Many summer flowers are coming into bloom here at pbmGarden as the garden begins to transition away from spring, but a week of much needed rain has left many of the blooms looking a bit ragged.

Fortunately the lower shelf of my refrigerator was still stocked with salvaged peony buds from last week’s thunderstorms. After several hours at room temperature half-dozen Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’ flowers were opened partially and eager to serve as stand-ins for the hydrangeas.

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

I floated the peonies in several inches of water in a special bowl with matte black finish on the outside. Its shiny red glazed interior coordinates with the delicate red brushstrokes on the flower petals, but as the peonies continued to open that aspect of the design was lost.

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

White flowers of Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ and deep red snapdragons tucked among the peonies are used as accents.

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’

 

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Foliage
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Vase
Red/Black ceramic bowl

After several more hours the peonies were fuller and lush. Lightly fragrant, they look glamorous atop the piano.

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

In A Vase On Monday – Festiva Centerpiece

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Wordless Wednesday—In The Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

 

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Penstemon and Snapdragon

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) opening in Meditation Circle

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Angelonia angustifolia (Summer Snapdragon)

Various Thymes in Meditation Circle

In A Vase On Monday – May Flowers

In A Vase On Monday – May Flowers

Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement every Monday using materials collected from our gardens. The garden is happy this month—more peonies are flowering and my heirloom rose opened this week.

Each peony is so large as to fill a vase just on its own. When gathering them I cut their stems short so as to leave as many buds as possible on the shrubs. This made it difficult to arrange them.

I thought I would use one each of Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima,’ ‘Pink Parfait’ and ‘Madame Emile Debatene’ but there was not enough room in the Ikebana vase I had chosen. Even replacing one with Iris germanica ‘Immortality’ gave the vase a crowded look.

Iris germanica ‘Immortality,’ Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’ and Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

I decided to rework the vase using roses if I had time later, so eventually I started over.

The old-fashioned rose is the fullest in several years. My mother’s first cousin shared this rose with me many years ago and I brought it to this garden 17 years ago. My mother and her mother also grew this rose, as did my daughter for a couple of years before she moved to California. She is visiting us this week with her husband so has been able to enjoy the garden as it reaches its peak.

Old-fasioned Rose and Spiderwort

Just as I began cutting the roses we had a downpour, so I only had a couple to use. The roses ended up on the left side near the base.

In A Vase On Monday – May Flowers

‘Madame Emile Debatene’ made a come-back at the upper middle of the design, just a slightly open bud,  and this time with a long stem to provide some height. Here is what it looks like when opened more fully.

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

‘Festiva Maxima’ is anchored on the right. I did not have time to gather more flowers, but I could have used two or three more roses to offset the size of the white peony.

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Several stems of sunrise-hued snapdragons enhance the color palette and add texture.

In A Vase On Monday – May Flowers

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Old-fashioned Rose

I was not completely satisfied. I still wanted to use the third peony, Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait,’ so I found a way and I think it helped balance out the design.

In A Vase On Monday – May Flowers

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Iris germanica ‘Immortality’
Old-fashioned Rose
Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’
Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’
Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)
Foliage
Peony
Vases
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Triangle Black Wave (6.5 W x 6.5 L x 2H)
Rounded white glass bowl

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

Exceptionally cold weather this winter seems to have invigorated the peonies—first to open is Coral Charm. Its magnificent show this spring is the inspiration for today’s design. Planted in the western border May 2015, it has achieved six blooms this year.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

I selected the oldest of the blooms to cut. Usually I do not mind cutting anything from the garden for use indoors, but I did think twice about this one.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

It was a busy week here with obligations that kept me away from my own garden, but I did manage a few hours of weeding and each day I explored to see what might be blooming. It was the kind of week when new flowers suddenly appeared, each with their unique charms. One such wonder, Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke,’ is just a lovely plant. Its pea-like blossoms seemed ideal to include in today’s vase.

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’ and Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Many kinds of iris are in bloom this week also. I chose Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris) for the way it complements the baptisia, though its delicate demeanor enhances all the other flowers in fact. The gentle foliage belongs to the baptisia.

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

Snapdragons are slowly opening in the meditation circle where they have survived several years. I clipped one of their first blooms to add a bit of sass.

The deep red adds impact to the arrangement overall; the interior of the peony carries a red punch of its own.

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

A stealthy come-along from a plant exchange a couple of years ago, Oenothera speciosa (Pink evening primrose) is deceptively pretty. After its showed up last spring I was warned last year this is a thug that deserves no mercy. It is in like-minded company–there is a waiting line of plants that need to be eradicated from this particular border where the Oenothera has made its home. What a dream it would be if these hard-hitters could compete with each other so aggressively all could be kept in check.  Meanwhile the oenothera has to earn its keep by participating in Monday’s vase.

Oenothera speciosa (Pink evening primrose)

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)
Oenothera speciosa (Pink evening primrose)
Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)
Foliage
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Vase
Hand painted Fenton Glass Vase – USA

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’

In A Vase On Monday – April Charms

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Felicity

In A Vase On Monday – Felicity

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Snapdragons planted in the meditation circle last fall overwintered well and began their colorful spring performance this past week.

Snapdragons in Meditation Circle

 

Snapdragons in Meditation Circle

The flowers are shockingly beautiful this year—blooms of exuberant red, brandishing throats brushed with sunset.

Snapdragons in Meditation Circle

In A Vase On Monday – Felicity

Unopened buds are deep rose.

Snapdragons in Meditation Circle

Two dozen voluptuous stems dropped into a container required little work to arrange.

In A Vase On Monday – Felicity

The true effort came in trying to photograph the red essence of these flowers. Nearly impossible. I ported these flowers upstairs and down, on to front and back porches and I took pictures with them resting on almost every horizontal surface available.

The container is from my collection of five red and black raku pots by North Carolina potter, Charles Chrisco. Chrisco’s literature states that the name of the Japanese art form raku translates to “felicity” or great happiness.

 

In A Vase On Monday – Felicity

Materials

Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Vase
Red/black raku vase, Charles Chrisco, Chrisco’s Pottery

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Red Tower

In A Vase On Monday - Red Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Red Tower

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

It has been a busy Monday but wanted to prepare a quick vase. Actually I made one last night but could not get decent photographs in the rainy evening light and in the end I was not satisfied with the design.

Floral choices are limited this week so I have to default to another week of red camellias.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ is contentedly blooming in the early days of December. Some recent evenings have been down into the 30s F. but not below freezing, so the flowers have remained fresh.

Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

I cut larger branches today and quickly assembled a tall pyramid. The container is a new ceramic ikebana piece from my sister-in-law, who has been visiting for a few days. The vase has 3 integrated ceramic tubes, built-in stem holders which are quite a convenience. Water is added to the base and it flows into each stem for easy watering.

In A Vase On Monday - Red Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Red Tower

Here is a peek at my earlier attempt. I conditioned the materials in a glass and never had time to move them into an actual vase. The surprise in this one is hard to see but toward the back is a single Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower), complemented with a  couple of stems of Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’. Husker Red Penstemon picks up the red Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon). Iris leaves are the final touch, folded over and tucked to create movement.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon), Penstemon 'Husker Red',Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower), Iris leaves, Black and Blue salvia

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon), Penstemon ‘Husker Red’,Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower), Iris leaves, Black and Blue salvia

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others from around the globe are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Recent Blooms As Summer Wanes

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

It feels a bit strange, but welcome all the same, to see a bearded iris reblooming. This one is a pass-along and I do not know its name. This image is from August 27. The flowers lasted but a short time under the strong summer sun.

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

There’s been essentially no rain for 6 weeks so the garden looks sad. A few blooms here and there lift my spirits, but can do only so much. I do have a few photographs of flowers taken over the last couple of weeks to record and document the waning days of Summer 2016. Today seems to be bloom day so the timing works well. Some of the pictures from September 2 have water droplets that disprove my memory, but the rain was brief, not the quenching, restorative kind.

Zinnia

Zinnia – September 2, 2016

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' (Black-eyed Susan)

Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ (Black-eyed Susan) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Marigold

Marigold

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Periwinkle (Vinca)

Periwinkle (Vinca) – September 2, 2016

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides – September 2, 2016

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata 'Nicky'

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ – September 2, 2016

Euphorbia 'Shorty' (Shorty Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge) – September 2, 2016

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower) – September 2, 2016

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush) – September 2, 2016

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood) – September 2, 2016

With apologies to anyone who is sensitive to spiders, this intrepid garden sentry has been a constant presence for several weeks. Just after I discovered it (and almost backed into it), the Yellow Garden spider relocated to its current location from the other side of the tree. It is also sometimes know as Writing Spider.

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) -August 27, 2016

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) – September 2, 2016

With the pressing heat the garden has not been tended for weeks. I made a quick stop this afternoon in search of Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) to replace Angelonia, the stalwart of the meditation circle from June until frost.

I should have shopped at a better garden center but it is unlikely I will have time to get to one. At this store the available snapdragons were generically labelled and although I had hoped for white ones, the choices were either “unknown” (because no flowers had opened) or yellow or this multicolored one that I chose. It sports mixed flowers of red, pink, coral and yellow and should add some pep to the labyrinth.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

 

 

 

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

On this Memorial Day I am joining Cathy’s  In A Vase On Monday, a weekly opportunity to share cut flowers from one’s garden.

Gardenias grow 7 or 8 feet tall along the north side of our house. They began blooming this past week and their first fresh, fragrant blossoms were a clear choice for today’s arrangement.

Gardenia sp.

Gardenia sp.

Gardenias

Gardenias

Companions for the gardenias are deep red antirrhinum and Black and Blue salvia.

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

The vase for today belonged to a special neighbor and friend who passed away last year. A brilliant, well-travelled and well-read woman, Linda had a warm smile for everyone, an unforgettable laugh and a fascinating story for every occasion. From time to time I helped her with technical issues with her no longer extant WordPress blog. On her blog she interspersed recordings of her daily life in Chapel Hill as a writer, with accounts of experiences growing up in Seattle and her time overseas as an American Foreign Service spouse where one of her official duties in 1990 was to greet Pope John Paul II during his tour of Africa. Among many things, we shared a penchant for Ann Patchett novels and anything related to Julia Child. A few years older than I, she kindly took me under her wing a bit, which was touching. I am grateful to have this lovely keepsake of our friendship.

As befitting its former owner, the vessel holding today’s flowers is unique. Made of blown glass, the form is asymmetrical with alternating bands of blue and green color. The top is loosely pinched together leaving just a small narrow opening, yet it accommodated quite a few stems.

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

Materials

Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon)
Gardenia sp.
Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

As always, thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower obsession. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Easy Delights

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Once again I am joining Cathy for In A Vase On Monday, a weekly invitation to fill and share a vase using materials gathered from one’s garden. The pass-along gardenia featured in last week’s vase continues to be the main source for cutting.

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides

We had guests visiting on Sunday and at the last minute I ran outside to gather a few fresh flowers. With no time for me to arrange them, the flowers practically settled themselves into a small blue ceramic vase. The blossoms looked content and I was too.

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides

A few extras fit easily into the colorful multi-stemmed vase my daughter gave me. I adore this vase, which seems to work with any type or color of flower.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Materials

Flowers
Gardenia jasminoides
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for welcoming everyone to join her in this addictive Monday diversion. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Warning

Garden View

Garden View

When I am an old garden I shall wear purple

With a red plant that doesn’t go and doesn’t suit me.

–With apologies to Jenny Joseph (read full poem “Warning“).

In my dream garden there are blues of every sort, purples and greens. A few genteel spots of soft yellow, refined and restrained, break up the space. Accents of sophisticated whites highlight the borders.

Iris germanica 'Immortality'

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Baptisia 'Purple Smoke'

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Isotoma fluviatilis (Blue Star Creeper)

Isotoma fluviatilis (Blue Star Creeper)

Iris In Southern Side Path

Iris In Southern Side Path

Iris germanica

Iris germanica

Japanese Iris

Japanese Iris

Salvia nemorosa 'May Night' (Hardy Sage)

Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)

But this spring I am loving the over-the-top combinations brought on by a happenstance purchase of dark red snapdragons late last autumn. (A single pink stow-away found its way here too). I grew up believing pink and red did not go together any more than purple and red.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

My mantra for this garden always has been based on peace, calm and contemplation. But every morning when I peek out I smile at the riot of color. It is over-the-top. When I am working outdoors the word gaudy bubbles into my thoughts, but I cannot stop smiling.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

When my husband and I take breakfast, lunch and supper on the screened porch overlooking the garden, we sigh in amazement and smile. A garden that makes us smile—what more?

Northern Border

Northern Border

Salvia nemorosa 'May Night' (Hardy Sage) and Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage) and Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Salvia nemorosa 'May Night' (Hardy Sage), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox), and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Iris

Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox), and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Iris

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

So what of this outrageous color? The garden will be 14 years old at the end of May. It is a teenager, not grown old at all, just finding itself.

Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear) In Southern Side Path

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) In Southern Side Path

Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

In A Vase On Monday—Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday - Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday – Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday is a weekly opportunity to fill a vase using materials gathered from one’s garden and share it through Cathy’s Rambling In The Garden. Juggling a busy schedule today I almost skipped making a vase, but it nagged at me at bit. If Cathy could make the effort while away on vacation I decided I wanted to find a few minutes for one too.

Snapdragon

Snapdragon

For many weeks the red snapdragons planted in the meditation circle have been simply a pleasure, but the color is heavy for this time of year. I purchased them last October at a greatly reduced price. The dark color, perfect as winter was coming on, now seems too rich and velvety for spring.

That said, there is little else to complain about. The snapdragons overwintered beautifully and are quite long-lasting indoors and out. I collected about 2 dozen of them for today’s vase and also added a few sprigs of white Dianthus to try to brighten the arrangement a bit.

Dianthus and Snapdragon

Dianthus and Snapdragon

For the container I finally settled on a red pitcher with white hearts, a sweet gift from my late mother-in-law after she saw me admiring it in a kitchen store oh so many years ago.

In A Vase On Monday - Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday – Snapdragons

Materials

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Dianthus ‘Ideal Select White’

In A Vase On Monday - Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday – Snapdragons

I took several pictures outdoors on the back porch to try to capture the contrasting colors better, but my camera battery ran out before I could experiment much. I am glad to have the flowers to enjoy this week.

In A Vase On Monday - Snapdragons

In A Vase On Monday – Snapdragons

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Cold Survivors

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Today I am joining Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday that encourages garden bloggers to create fresh arrangements each Monday using materials found in our gardens.

The weekend weather in central North Carolina dropped 15 degrees below normal temperatures for November, reaching down into the mid-20s F. I knew it was coming but I do not think I have ever been so pained to see the garden succumb to freezing. Preparing a vase to share each week will become much harder for many Mondays to come.

My youngest sister surprised me this week with another perfect gift, a sage green glazed ceramic container that I hoped to use today. It is a shallow dish with a leaf shaped top. Three holes in the top are designed to hold short stemmed flowers, such as camellias.

New leaf-shaped ceramic vase holds Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

 

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ has been blooming for a few weeks, even before the department stores could fill the aisles with Christmas baubles, but the cold turned its blossoms to mush. Fortunately by sneaking deep inside the heart of the Yuletide shrub I was able to rescue three blossoms that survived the recent blast of cold weather.

When I first entered the garden I noticed the deep red Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in the meditation circle were largely unaffectedly by the severe shift in temperature. I discovered one snapdragon that had opened to reveal decidedly pink flowers, not red.

An unexpected pink Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

I had plucked a few side shoots from half a dozen plants to use just in case it was impossible to locate some usable camellias. Then once inside with the camellias in place, it seemed a shame not to use the snapdragons. I combined them with three sprigs of chartreuse sedum and placed them into a turquoise vase.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Sedum

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Sedum

I used a bright red wooden tray to frame the two arrangements of flowers.

In A Vase On Monday-5

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday. Perhaps you will be inspired to share your own vase.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide'

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

In A Vase On Monday—A Trio Of Rescues

 

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Each Monday brings an opportunity to join in Cathy’s weekly challenge called In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials collected from the garden.

The temperature fell slightly below freezing overnight for the first time this fall. The garden seems fine this mooring, but yesterday with weather warnings in mind I rescued flowers for today’s vase and ended up with three informal arrangements.

Most of the 16 red snapdragons purchased on sale for $.25 apiece October 3, 2014 are flowering in one small section of the meditation path. It will be interesting to see how well they do over the winter. With luck they should bloom again in early spring.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) In Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) In Meditation Circle

Bought at the same time as the snapdragons, a red dahlia hybrid with no name is full of buds. This one flower managed to open so far, making it worth the $1.00 I paid for the plant.

Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

 

I am fairly new to growing dahlias so am not sure how the cold will affect them this week, but the temperatures will be much warmer the next few days and I hope they continue to bloom a while longer. Last week a friend Libby passed along some heirloom tubers from another red dahlia her mother used to grow. I am so looking forward to seeing it bloom next year (thanks Libby!).

The snapdragons and dahlia went into the spherical turquoise vase my sisters gave me last spring.

Turquoise vase of Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Turquoise vase of Dahlia x hybrida and Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

The flowers on my passalong Chrysanthemum starting showing color mid-October and are now in full-bloom. They are a rich yellow in bud, but the outer petals become nearly white as they open. I try pinching the stems back to make the plant behave better, but each fall this plants ends up sprawling in its own lovely way.

I used a small blue matte-glazed vase to hold the chrysanthemums. A stem of Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea) foliage lifts the arrangement vertically, while a single Pelargonium leaf anchors the design.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

A few sprigs of dark purple salvia provide contrast to the yellow blossoms.

Chrysanthemums and May Night Salvia

There were enough Chrysanthemums left over to easily fill another vase.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)
Chrysanthemum
Dahlia x hybrida
Salvia × sylvestris ‘May Night’ (Meadow sage)

Foliage and Pods
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
‘Carolina Sapphire’ Arizona Cypress
Pelargonium (Geranium)

In A Vase On Monday - A Trio Of Rescues

In A Vase On Monday – A Trio Of Rescues

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday. Perhaps you will be inspired to share your own vase.