Floral Design Inspired By Art – Part II

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

I wanted to share a few more entries from last week’s Art In Bloom at the North Carolina Museum Of Art. Whether you agree or not, I think you will be able to appreciate why this is my favorite from this year’s show.

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

One of the most exquisite designs in the show, the color palette is masterful. It is designed by Stacey Burkert, inspired by Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora.

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

The designer’s statement reads: This terracotta urn has worn to reveal an incredible array of earth-toned color variations. My aim is to capture these hues along with the eroded, natural texture of the amphora.

Closer look at the urn. Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

For me the initial impact was all about color. As I studied it the textural elements of all materials in the arrangement seemed perfectly chosen. The primary floral materials listed in the catalog were: roses, amaranthus, orchids, fritilaria, thistle, seeded eucalyptus, cosmos, scabiosa pod, astilbe, hellebore.

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

The previous pictures all view the flowers from the back side because from the front, outside light coming into the gallery placed the design in silhouette. The color is off in this next one but I wanted to show you this front side anyway—the shape is a bit different.

Designer: Stacey Burkert. Inspiration: Etrusco-Corinthian, Neck-Amphora

Here are a few more designs from the show.

This one captures the lines and rich colors of George Bireline’s Red Shift. Bireline was in the first class of the graduate studio art program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a long-time professor at N.C. State University’s School of Design.

Designer: Martha Phillips Mazur. Inspiration: Red Shift, George Bireline

There was harsh overhead light that made photographing this design a challenge.

Designer: Martha Phillips Mazur. Inspiration: Red Shift, George Bireline

Beautiful masses of roses, various orchids and delphinium were used.

Designer: Martha Phillips Mazur. Inspiration: Red Shift, George Bireline

This design is based on the painting in the background by Childe Hassam. The flowers reflect the soft pastels; the vase, the golden frame.

Designer: Amy Wurster. Inspiration: Isles of Shoals, Appledore, Childe Hassam

I have long admired the Thomas Hart Benton painting on the left that inspires this next designer.

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

Spring on the Missouri depicts a family packing up a horse-drawn cart under threatening skies to escape the flooding river. Oddly, I misremembered this painting and thought of it as a Dust Bowl-era family.

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

The designer used interesting materials to show the harsh conditions…

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

yet, the work is beautiful and fascinating.

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

Designer: Amber Cassle. Inspiration: Spring on the Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton.

And what to do with this Rodin?

Designer: Jane Owen Barbot. Inspiration: The Burghers of Calais, First maquette, Auguste Rodin

Jane Owen Barbot used ageratum, bovardia, beehive ginger, chrysanthemum, cymbidium, dianthus, echeveria, roses, tai leaves, fasciated willow in her design.

Designer: Jane Owen Barbot. Inspiration: The Burghers of Calais, First maquette, Auguste Rodin

Designer: Jane Owen Barbot. Inspiration: The Burghers of Calais, First maquette, Auguste Rodin

Designer: Jane Owen Barbot. Inspiration: The Burghers of Calais, First maquette, Auguste Rodin

I lost track of who designed this, but many patrons enjoyed having their photo taken through the opening.

2018 Art In Bloom

2018 Art In Bloom

2018 Art In Bloom

I believe the soft yellow spikes are Foxtail Lilies (Eremurus).

2018 Art In Bloom

Well, there were more (over fifty entries), but I must move on to other projects. You have been kind to tour with me as I revisited some of Art In Bloom.

I leave you with some final images from the show. Members of Triangle Bonsai Society were on hand to talk everything bonsai. This one was particularly striking against the backdrop of the leafless trees.

2018 Art In Bloom

The reflecting pool made a lovely space for display.

Carpinus (Hornbeam) In training about 30 years from seedlings

2018 Art In Bloom

After meeting friends for lunch at one of the Museum cafés, I attended “Influenced By The East—Elements of Sogetsu Ikebana Presentation,” featuring Denver floral artist Arthur Williams. Williams wowed the audience for two hours with his imaginative designs. My camera battery had had enough by then so I took very few pictures.

2018 Art In Bloom – Denver floral artist Arthur Williams. Cherry blossoms and forsythia.

2018 Art In Bloom – glass bottles, balloons and potatoes.

I am already looking forward to next year’s show.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones With Lenten Roses

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones With Lenten Roses

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

The starting point for today’s vase is a small glass bowl I found in the NCMA gift shop while visiting Art In Bloom this week. The glass is translucent white and has a pleasing low profile, rounded form.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

I have been enjoying the striking blooms of Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker.’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

My plan was to showcase anemones alone, but the result was so stark, I revisited the garden to collect a few hellebores to fill out the arrangement.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

A stem of Leucojum is tucked among the hellebores.

Leucojum, Hellebore and Anemone

 

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)
Leucojum (Snowflake)
Foliage
Lavender
Vase
Rounded white glass bowl

It was worth refashioning the design. In the end the colors of the hellebores brought out the purple hue of the anemones, resulting in a richer, more satisfying Monday vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones With Lenten Roses

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Floral Design Inspired By Art

On Friday I attended Art In Bloom at the North Carolina Museum Of Art. Wish you all could have been there.

West Building, NCMA, Raleigh, NC

This is the fourth year the museum has held this event in which floral designers are paired with art works from the museum’s collection through a drawing.  Their challenge is not to reproduce the art work, rather the designers seek inspiration from it. Some interpret literally, others are more abstract. Some focus on color, others on structure or texture. They all were able to create amazing designs for this show.

For the viewers each design is a fun puzzle to solve, scrutinizing the finished product against the piece of art to tease out which elements spoke to the florists.

There were over fifty designs in the show. Where to start? Well, a few friends have already posted their favorites from the show on various social media platforms and each person showed this entry. It was chosen by museum director Larry Wheeler for The Director’s Choice award.

Designer: Partha Daughtridge. Inspiration: Mary E. Goddard. Frank Duveneck.

There is no mistaking the drape and flow of the red gown. The verticality and proportions of the arrangement seem to capture perfectly that of the source art.

Closely look at the gloved arms. Or does this capture cap, face, neck, breast and gloves? More than that I admired the quality, choice and interplay of materials.

Designer: Partha Daughtridge. Inspiration: Mary E. Goddard. Frank Duveneck.

The theme is seamless from every direction.

Designer: Partha Daughtridge. Inspiration: Mary E. Goddard. Frank Duveneck.

What if in the art work lottery you had drawn this landscape painting to interpret? What flowers/foliage would you choose? What container? What scale?

Mono Pass, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. William Keith

Here is one designer’s interpretation.

Designer: Sarah Callahan. Inspiration: Mono Pass, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. William Keith

There is a play of light and shadow. I really love the white to lavender color shift of the delphiniums.

Designer: Sarah Callahan. Inspiration: Mono Pass, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. William Keith

Given another inspiration, Diana + Actaeon by Paul Manship, what choices would you make?

Diana + Actaeon, Paul Manship

Separate containers. White callas and pink for Diana. Anthuriums on the right.

Designer: J. P. Clark. Inspiration: Diana + Actaeon, Paul Manship

View from the back. That is a lot of green tick dianthus, along with a few dozen Gerbera daisies massed together.

Designer: J. P. Clark. Inspiration: Diana + Actaeon, Paul Manship

The designer also used dendrobium and cymbidium orchids were  Does anyone know what the flower is in the upper right corner below? (Asking for a friend.) [Thanks Eliza for identifying the flower as red ginger (Alpinia purpurata).]

Designer: J. P. Clark. Inspiration: Diana + Actaeon, Paul Manship

It would be fun to design with the types of flowers used by the designer, for example, King Protea is amazing. And then there is the sheer quantity of materials–a few dozen roses of each color.

Designer: J. P. Clark. Inspiration: Diana + Actaeon, Paul Manship

This next work was created by several members from Raleigh’s Avant Gardeners Garden Club. Inspiration: Madonna and Child, Sienese School. The custom-made box container coordinates beautifully with the frame of the art.

Designer: Avant Gardeners Garden Club. Inspiration: Madonna and Child, Sienese School.

The materials in this design were striking with pristine Assumption lilies for the Madonna.

Assumption Lilies

For the infant, ranunculus—such a soft, pretty color.

Ranunculus

One of my favorites was this one by two designers, Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens, and inspired by this garden scene titled In the Greenhouse by John Henry Twachtman.

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

Designers incorporated an old greenhouse window for charm and seemingly to isolate foreground from background. I love the palette used in this section.

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

I will walk you around the display.

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

And back to the beginning. I really enjoyed the structure and color of this entry and found it engaging.

Designers: Meredith Watson and Leigh Dickens. Inspiration: In the Greenhouse, John Henry Twachtman

I see I will not have time today to show you my very favorites from the show. Perhaps later in the week we can revisit the show.

For now I leave you with an interesting one inspired by a work by Joseph Albers. Albers had taught at the Bauhaus in Germany. When the school was closed down under Hitler, Albers was invited to teach at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. He immigrated in 1933 bringing the Bauhaus style of teaching to the United States.

Designer: Vandy Bradow, Inspiration: Study for Homage to the Square: “Hight Spring,” Joseph Albers.

Designer Vandy Bradow did a masterful job capturing the greens and grays, as well as the lines and the sense of “looking through.”

Designer: Vandy Bradow, Inspiration: Study for Homage to the Square: “Hight Spring,” Joseph Albers.

 

Dawn Of Spring, Hellebores Reign

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Spring arrived reluctantly this week. It has been wet and even snowed yesterday, with perhaps more wintry mix this weekend. Today the sun broke through to raise spirits, but it still feels too chilly to enjoy working in the garden.

I checked on a a few things this afternoon and in my wanderings was struck by how wonderful the hellebores are this year. Their buds were showing color during the first week of February and by mid-month were blooming.

One that I have had my eye on the past month is at last in its glory. So pleased this one made. It came from Pine Knot Farm two years ago and is flowering for the first time. The three buds remained tightly closed on this hellebore long after its nearby companions had ventured to open, but today I see they are open.

Helleborus ’Black Diamond’ (Winter Jewels® Black Diamond)

Helleborus ’Black Diamond’ (Winter Jewels® Black Diamond)

Helleborus ’Black Diamond’ (Winter Jewels® Black Diamond)

Here are a few more of the hellebores from Pine Knot Farm. Some show their faces easily.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Others are shy, but can be coaxed.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Nope…this one still wants to hide. Red markings outline each petal.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

The first ever hellebores in the garden were Helleborus niger, ordered through a neighbor. She was a horticulturist and placed a large order from Monrovia for those of us in our fledgling neighborhood garden club around 2002. The club lasted only about a year, the neighbor moved away after several more, but the hellebores have returned each year.

Helleborus niger (Christmas Rose)

These are pass-alongs from a Chapel Hill Garden Club friend.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten Rose)

Besides hellebores several other sights made me smile as I enjoyed seeing the garden in the sunlight.

Phlox subulata ‘Emerald Cushion Blue’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

Hope your spring is taking shape. Tomorrow I am headed out for the day to see over 50 floral designs inspired by art works in the collection at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Have a wonderful weekend!

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In contrast to last week’s frilly arrangement, today’s vase features a limited color palette, one that I enjoy: a restful combination of blue/violet, green and white.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

The starting point was Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker.’ Only a couple plants came back this year, so I must be sure to plan for more.  They are very difficult to grow in my garden and now I do not want to live without them.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

 

White flowers work well in arrangements and I love them in my garden. Iberis sempervirens (candytuft) is dotted around the borders. Sometimes it survives for years, other times only one season. I have been unable to figure out a perfect formula, but a sweet yoga friend, Suzanne, increased my candytuft holdings with a generous gift from her yard last summer.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

I was not planning to repeat yet another pale yellow hyacinth, but it was needed to help balance the design. As violet’s complementary color I knew it would fit in well, but the color is so soft it nearly comes off as white.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Other white blooms today include my favorite pure white Thalia Daffodils, which have just begun to open, and several stems of Leucojum, which I was pleased to see are continuing to bloom.

Narcissus ‘Thalia’

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth) sprang into action this week. I came across them only at the last minute, when searching for a few more stems to complete today’s design.

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Hyacinthus orientalis (Hyacinth Sunrise Mix)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Leucojum (Snowflake)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)
Foliage
Narcissus leaf
Phalaenopsis (moth orchid) leaves
Vase
Footed ceramic dish, charcoal gray matte finish

Two broad, dark green leaves of Phalaenopsis orchids create a backdrop for the flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Winter Tracings And Seeking Inspiration

As predicted, yesterday afternoon temperatures dropped. Rain turned to sleet and snow, quickly dusting and revealing the garden borders and meditation circle.

It is sunny this morning. The snow will soon depart, but the image leaves me contemplating why my garden design has become so stuck. I have not given it enough attention in recent years—I know that. But even when I was actively trying, I never dreamed big enough it seems.

I say that because recently my husband and I have begun watching episodes on Netflix of two British reality TV shows on landscape gardening.

One featuring Monty Don is titled Big Dreams, Small Spaces. In this series he visits lucky home gardeners, hears their goals and plans, makes suggestions, then returns once to check on progress, and a final time to reveal the results to his viewers and celebrate with a glass of champagne with the garden owners family and friends. By the end of the show the home gardeners have cut down trees, invasive vines and cleared rubbish; built walls, ponds, terraces and pathways; planted orchards, installed living walls and created multiple borders around their property all full of hundreds of English garden flowers in full bloom.

The other show is a bit of a tear jerker, but it is more interesting to me. Love Your Garden features horticulturist Alan Titchmarsh. This show’s premise has him going around the U.K. providing garden makeovers for deserving citizens. The garden owners are sent away for a while (exactly how long is not clear) while a team of experts comes in creates a garden customized for the owners needs and interests. I like this show better because there is more effort to introduce and describe the plants being used, money seems never to be an issue, and the labor it takes to do such projects seems more accurately portrayed.  There are a few awkward contrivances, nods toward the reality show template that try to hype or to create drama, tension or humor—the show would be better without these distractions—but the episodes are full of information.

Both of these shows do a good job of showcasing public and private gardens where one can find inspiration for solving similar garden problems. Only one season each of these British shows are currently available, but I hope more will be released here.

While I am dreaming of a complete garden overhaul, I am curious what you think. Are you familiar with these garden icons? Do you study their books? Have you watched the shows?  Where do you find inspiration?

 

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Springtime flowers and colors can be a bit frilly, but I resisted the urge to create something more abstract and restrained this week. As we set the clocks ahead this weekend to enjoy more daylight I decided to acknowledge and embrace the generosity and bounty of spring

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

It has been too cold and wet to enjoy the garden much recently and I have postponed much-needed weeding and other chores. Browsing around the borders on Friday I noticed 5 or 6 stems of lavender hyacinths had all flopped down toward the ground. Whether something was eating the roots or recent cold temperatures had caused the collapse I could not determine. Other colors nearby seemed fine. So it remains a mystery, but I rescued them for today’s vase. They seem to be taking in water and continue to look fresh.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

The pale yellow hyacinth continues to be a favorite, but it is joined this week by a more buttery yellow that is quite nice.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Bursting with flowers, bridal wreath spiraea was used to achieve height and textural relief.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

A small patch of Leucojum has been blooming recently. These are pass-alongs from my sisters’  garden. I gathered a few and tucked them into the vase for a little surprise when viewing at close range.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Materials
Flowers
Hyacinthus orientalis (Hyacinth Sunrise Mix)
Leucojum (Snowflake)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Foliage
None
Vase
Glazed ceramic vase

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Colors Of Spring Trio -March 4, 2018

Many readers were interested to know how long last week’s submerged flowers would last.

I had prepared the vases on Sunday mid-day. The anemone began fading after a day and a half, but kept intact. After another half-day (Tuesday morning), it was done and the water was colored purple.

The hyacinth lasted until Wednesday.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.