Author Archives: pbmgarden

About pbmgarden

Contemplating plants. Reforming my garden. Savoring peaceful moments. pbmgarden.blog

Yesterday Morning – Flowers

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) and Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) and Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) and Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Iris, Dianthus, Penstemon, Artemisia

Iris, Dianthus, Penstemon, Artemisia

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Dianthus, Verbena bonariensis, Artemisia

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Spiderwort

Yesterday Morning – Foliage

Leucanthemum superbum ‘Alaska’ and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Leucanthemum superbum ‘Alaska’ and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Hydrangea macrophylla

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Phlox paniculata ‘Robert Poore’ (Garden phlox)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Nasturtium ‘Vesuvius’

Notes On The Garden

Hemerocallis x ‘Stella de Oro’

After a cold, wet Wednesday, yesterday there remained a chill in the morning air as I took an early saunter around the garden.  Water drops clung to leaves and petals in places the sun had yet to reach. It was quiet except for calming notes of birdsong.

In front of the house (which faces east) a couple of plants rescued last year during a neighbor’s border renovation project were catching the early rays. (I think I have identified them correctly.)

Tulbaghia violacea (society garlic)

Hemerocallis x ‘Stella de Oro’

In a border along the south side of the drive ascelpias is making good progress. This area also has lots of echinacea popping through.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant) Readying to Bloom

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

This spring the southern side path heading toward the back garden has been flourishing with daffodils, irises, baptisia, and clematis.  Unfortunately this bed has a terrible infestation of bermuda grass that seems impossible to manage. I hired an organic company to help with it, to dig it up, but dosed with a great deal of mansplaining, their expensive efforts in March have proved to be merely cosmetic.

(I am focused on trying to keep it from getting further into the main garden and in two places have used layers of cardboard and piles of mulch to smother it. This can take two years from what I have read.  I think this grass came in a few years ago in some bad mulch at a time I was not able to pay attention to the garden. I am trying to avoid spraying harmful products but frankly it is overwhelming to manage.)

So even as this ginger lily emerges with vigor, the grass continues its rampage on this border.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

In the midst of my indecisiveness about this dilemma I came across a white form of rose campion having an identity crisis!

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion)

 

Clematis

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

The garden’s two Clematis have done well this spring. This Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ along the southern side path was the first one I ever planted. Last summer I cut it all the way back to the ground after the leaves all turned brown (per The Gardeners World’s Monte Don’s instruction for treating clematis wilt).

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Over time I have attempted more clematis but they haven’t survived the first years. Finally in 2015 I discovered this red one at my local garden center, Clematis ‘Niobe’.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Clematis ‘Niobe’

It has never bloomed all summer as advertised but in spring it usually shows such promise.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Last month I added three more clematis around one single trellis. There’s another Clematis ‘Jackmanii’, Clematis ‘Multi Blue’, and Clematis ‘Duchess of Edinburgh’ planted April 4, 2021. So far the rabbits have not gotten them (but they are munching dalhias and phlox).

Will I regret not allowing more room?

clockwise from top: Clematis ‘Jackmanii’, Clematis ‘Multi Blue’ and Clematis ‘Duchess of Edinburgh’ (clockwise from top)

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

As the irises take their last bow at center stage in the garden, peonies have taken on the leading role.  I cut bundles of them, mostly P. ‘Festiva Maxima’, after a quick but forceful rain Friday, rescuing some whose stems had broken and others which simply couldn’t hold their heads up under the weight of raindrops.

From the half a dozen peony vases scattered about on the mantel, windowsills, counters and in the foyer, I chose the vase in the hallway to share this day.

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

Though cut several days ago it was early this morning before I could photograph the peonies, so they now have opened their hearts fully.

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

As it is wet and gray now after pre-dawn showers, the light was not strong. I didn’t like the cast of the images so I applied a preset filter that seemed to better emphasize the flowers: Dramatic Cool.

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

Materials
Flowers
Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’
Foliage
None
Container
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Triangle Blue Wave (6.5 W x 6.5 L x 2H)

In A Vase On Monday – Dramatic Cool

Thank you to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

Fabian In The Garden

Iris ‘Fabian’ (Tall Bearded) -May 4, 2021

This spring the irises have bloomed with gusto and vigor beginning with Iris ‘Crimson King’ on March 30, 2021. Throughout April there has been a succession of different ones.

One of the last to appear opened just a few days ago on May 1, 2021. By scouring the Historic Iris Preservation Society (HIPS) website recently I have tentatively found its name: Iris ‘Fabian’.

Iris ‘Fabian’ (Tall Bearded) passalong from Henrietta -May 1, 2021

I’ve grown this passalong iris since the late 1970s and brought it to my current garden in May 2001 (that’s 20 years ago this month).

According to the information I found from HIPS, Salter collected this Tall Bearded Iris in England in 1868.  The American Iris Society Checklist of 1939 listed this iris as “extinct.” It is said to have been later rediscovered growing at the Presby Memorial Iris Garden in Montclair, New Jersey (which I would love to visit by the way). Described as a “smokey purple diploid” I have always referred to mine as “dusky.” Sweetly scented, the flowers are smaller than those of most TB iris.

At one time I. ‘Fabian’ was more prevalent in this south-facing border, but I. ‘Helen Collingwood’ is more dominant now. This current view is from just a few days ago, May 3, 2021. There are only three Iris ‘Fabian’ visible in front.

In front are I. ‘Fabian’ greatly outnumbered by I. ‘Helen Collingwood’ -May 3, 2021

By contrast there were only a few I. ‘Helen Collingwood’ five years ago in this same border. Below is the view at that time (May 3, 2016, seen from the opposite end of the border).

In this picture I. ‘Fabian’ has not yet opened, but is in bud between the meditation circle and the pink rose bush. Phlox and Meadow Sage were in bloom as well in this bed.

Garden View With Meditation Circle -May 3, 2016.  Purple and white I. ‘Helen Collingwood’ stand guard.

A large number of Fabians had opened after that picture was taken. One can spot a few Helens visible at the top center of this image. (Spiderwort was blooming and spreading out of control.)

Iris ‘Fabian’ crowded by spiderwort -May 11, 2016

This is the view that year from inside the border, standing near the rose bush, looking south across the meditation circle. (This time five years ago is about the last time the meditation circle was presentable. It was frequently underwater during the heavy rains this past winter and it needs a serious makeover.)

Iris ‘Fabian’ was predominate -May 11, 2016

Iris ‘Fabian’ -May 13, 2016

Through the years this border became not only infested with spiderwort, but the irises were intertwined with a dreadfully aggressive aster that to this day I am battling. So I had dug up a lot of the irises in order to eliminate the interlopers. In the process I lost track of which rhizome was which. I know at least one from this group of passalongs is missing now. Fortunately I did save Iris ‘Fabian’.

I will be vigilant to ensure its continued presence in the garden.

Iris ‘Fabian’ -May 4, 2021

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Roses  back view

My passalong roses began blooming this week lending a sweet, gentle fragrance to the garden.

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

Mama’s first cousin Virgie shared this and many plants with me that became the foundation of my garden life. My mother and grandmother also grew this rose, so today’s vase is a sentimental one.

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

An elegant crystal vase that once belonged to my mother’s older sister made just the right container for the family roses.

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

Materials
Flowers
Old-fashioned rose (passalong from Virgie)
Foliage
Container
Waterford crystal vase (6-inches tall, 6-inch diameter)

In A Vase On Monday – Roses

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove. (Sunday)

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove (Saturday)

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

With rain predicted for all day Saturday, Friday evening I gathered half-dozen peonies that had opened during the week. (Water-logged peonies look so sad.)

I left them in a couple of plastic quart-size containers on the back porch to condition before bringing them indoors. A wooden box happened to be nearby when I was ready to bring them inside so I used it to carry the two containers of flowers. I loved the way the peonies looked sitting in the wooden chest and and decided to take a few pictures before actually setting about to create an arrangement. First, I thought, might as well tuck in bits of foliage to conceal the plastic containers to make the pictures better, and then done–I just stopped here, saving my preplanned design notions for another week.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove  -side view

Some of the foliage was freshly chosen and some was plucked from last week’s vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’, Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ and peony leaves form a soft bedding beneath the tall flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

The arranged flowers ended up a magnificent 24 inches long by 20 inches deep and 17 inches high.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove  -front

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove   -back

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

When fully open the peonies are 6 inches in diameter.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

Peonies are an elegant flower and look at home in refined containers of porcelain, crystal or silver; here, they elevate the unassuming box into a chest of valuable treasure.

Materials
Flowers
Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)
Foliage
Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Paeonia lactiflora
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Container
Wooden Box

P. ‘Coral Charm’ ages with distinguished grace. While they were beautiful on Saturday, by Sunday they had opened further and the color had mellowed. I had this post all ready to go but couldn’t resist overloading it a few more images to show their more mature state as they begin to fade to yellow.

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

In A Vase On Monday – Coral Trove

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

Thursday Journal

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

April 22, 2021. The temperature at 6 a.m. was 34°F. and after dropping to 32°F by 7 a.m. it began climbing up again.  61°F at 5 p.m.

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

The garden seemed unbothered by the cold night and a couple more irises opened today. One came from my former late-1970s neighbor Henrietta. This tall bearded iris features pale lavender standards and bright violet-purple falls.  Sweetbay identified this passalong last year as Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’.

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

The second newly blooming iris is a reblooming type with ruffled petals. Also a passalong without a name, it came from a plant swap in my current neighborhood in October 2013.  The petal color strikes me as a clean, clear, pure yellow, with a touch of white on the falls below the yellow beard.

Tall Bearded Iris

Tall Bearded Iris

Tall Bearded Iris

A few more flowers opened on the Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony); a bud on my passalong rose bush is showing color; and two snapdragon plants from years past have survived and appear ready to bloom. The snapdragons suffered a lot of rabbit damage last spring so I am happy to see them return.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Finding Openings

This week has been a busy time for openings. This fragrant patch of Tall Bearded Iris is brightening up the southern side path this week.

Tall Bearded Iris. Passalong from Wave Road neighbor, Henrietta, c. 1977.

Henrietta was our across-the-street neighbor at our previous home on Wave Road in the late 1970s and she shared many of her tall bearded irises with me. Some of her pass-alongs , including this deep yellow beauty, came with me when we moved here 20 years ago this May. I do not have a name for this one.

Tall Bearded Iris. Passalong from Wave Road neighbor, Henrietta, c. 1977.

This soft yellow iris opened yesterday and is another pass-along.  My sister-in-law mailed a huge 4 x 4-foot carton of these irises (to our Wave Road house) all the way from Idaho in the late 1990s. She knew them as Japanese Irises, but I haven’t been able to confirm. It’s a sweet, delicate flower, not as showy as the one above.

Japanese Iris (passalong from Kathleen)

I have admired the color of this iris in my current neighbor’s yard for a number of years. When she replanted her entire side border last year I was happy to give it and a few other of her plants a new home. The iris opened just this afternoon.

Tall Bearded Iris. Rescued last year from neighbor’s border renovation.

A second iris opened today, a re-blooming one with large flowers, Iris germanica ‘Immortality’.

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Clematis ‘Niobe’ also chose today to unfurl its lovely red petals.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ is not fully open but has made good progress today.

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Always the first to bloom in my garden Peony ‘Coral Charm’ has strong stems and rich color.  I have had a close watch on this peony the past several weeks, but I looked away a moment this morning and suddenly three flowers had opened when I looked back.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

There is a freeze warning for early tomorrow morning, a little late in the season. I know some of you have or will have snow this week too so there is no room for me to complain. It’s 66 F. this afternoon and has been a gorgeous, sunny, albeit extremely windy, spring day in April.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

A neighbor was selling flower bouquets Saturday from her porch and I could not resist when the list included lupine and viburnum. I have unsuccessfully tried growing lupine seed this year. Then the flower grower didn’t bring lupine this week after all, but threw in buttercups. The viburnum heads were fairly weak even though I conditioned the stems overnight. The color is useful though and I immediately thought it would pair well with deep purple Iris ‘Crimson King’.

Iris ‘Crimson King’ and Viburnum

I filled out the arrangement with other irises of the moment, and other odds and ends.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Ranunculus bulbosus (Buttercup)

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris) and Iris ‘Crimson King’

Materials
Flowers
Iris ‘Crimson King’
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)
Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)
Ranunculus bulbosus (Buttercup)
Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies (Narcissus x medioluteus)
Viburnum
Foliage
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Container
Glass Pedestal Dish

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies (Narcissus x medioluteus)

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Friday Reflections

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

The weather has been ideal for gardening this week and I have put in a few hours each day and nearly all day on Thursday.  There are so many tasks that need attention that no matter which one I set out to do, I am finding it hard not to become distracted and end up working on something else.

I have been planting seeds, bulbs, perennials and dahlias.  I must have really craved color and flowers this winter, but it is hard to know where I imagined I could plant everything I ordered.

As part of my “Friday reflections” I wrote and then deleted paragraphs about weeds, bermuda grass infestations, yellow jacket nests. Sharing the positive highlights of the garden is more exciting.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

This week I have seen butterflies: monarch, black swallowtail, and a pearl crescent (every day). None was interested in posing for me or even getting close so the image quality is poor, but I want to post them here as a record.

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

I was pleased to see a Bumble Bee checking out the ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe.

Bumble Bee and ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

Bumble Bee and ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

A green anole sunned on the back garage steps and scurried just for a moment each time I passed, before settling back into its sunny spot.

Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)

More irises opened and others are close. This is one my garden blogger friend from Petals and Wings (now mostly on instagram) sent me last fall. I’m not sure if they will bloom this year but they are growing and look healthy. The variegated foliage caught my attention and the flower is purple/blue.

Iris (passalong)

Iris (passalong)

Many of my Iris tectorum have disappeared in the past couple years, so I am especially happy to welcome this one back.

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Another iris of note, this one is one of the only ones I have actually purchased.

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Hope you are having a wonderful week in and out of the garden.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

Our twenty-year-old river birch was on my mind this week. We have had to call to get an estimate for trimming several branches that are wandering toward our neighbors’ roof. Reaching up from our driveway I was able to snag a few stems with male catkins to include in today’s vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

But what I had had my eye on for days was to feature a generous number of white Dutch iris. They finally opened mid-week, several dozen, and I selected fourteen stems. Fifteen would have been better.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

I collected cerinthe to accentuate the lavender streak in the iris and snipped candytuft  to soften the edge of the vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

Arranging flowers often takes much more materials than I first estimate. Eventually I returned outside for extra amounts of cerinthe and candytuft and ending up with hellebores as well. Now aged to a a rich lime green, when it first emerged the double hellebore was creamy white. This became one of my favorite sections of the design.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

I had not seen originally how strongly the color of the river birch catkins would affect the other flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

The idea of white, lavender blue was overtaken by golden catkins.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

Materials
Flowers
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Foliage
Betula nigra (River Birch)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Container
Crystal pedestal dish (floral foam in plastic 6-inch Lomey dish)

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

In the end I was satisfied with the way this turned out.  While I was playing with flowers my husband had been patiently awaiting lunch; I really wanted to get that fifteenth iris (or more) but it was time to stop.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris With Birch

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

Sunday Notebook

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

This week I have seen 5 or 6 Eastern Tiger Butterflies—a couple passing through the garden and others along the highway into town. But I have not been able to get any pictures.

Yesterday though I had my first opportunity of 2021 to photograph a butterfly when a Pearl Crescent stopped briefly on Eastern red columbine (until I tried to take its picture). Then it fluttered around and settled down on the mulched ground beneath.  This is a small and common butterfly of North America.

The video belies just how active the butterfly was. I had switched to video because the wings had been beating so quickly I couldn’t get a good image. As soon as I started the video the crescent seemed to calm down and just totally chill.

Several kinds of irises have opened enough now to make a nice, colorful display.

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ and Iris ‘Crimson King’

Iris ‘Crimson King’

Iris ‘Crimson King’

Iris ‘Crimson King’

Nearly two dozen white Dutch Iris opened this week in a small narrow patch beside the driveway. They have been happy here for many years.

Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)

There is only one of this sapphire blue Dutch iris. This really is the color, just amazing.

Iris × hollandica (Dutch Iris)

Yellow pine pollen has been coating everything, the plants, flowers, porch furniture. It seems much worse than usual. A few thunderstorms helped clear the air overnight but it quickly builds back up.

Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

Post-vaccination, I resumed teaching my weekly gentle yoga and meditation class this morning at the wellness center. (My last in-person class was March 13, 2020.) Some classes are beginning to meet in person outdoors or with a limited number of people in the studios but mine is a virtual incarnation for now. It was great to see familiar faces and hear voices and laughter.

Have a great week everyone!

Narcissus x medioluteus

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

I became curious this week about my last-to-bloom narcissus. With its white perianths and very small cup coronas it’s been in my April garden since 2014.

N. ‘King Alfred’, ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and ‘Thalia’ are all finished just as this little one is starting to open. I wondered why the flowers sit inside the middle of the foliage and what to call it and tried to remember where I bought it.  It was I think just a little temptation in the small floral section of a neighborhood grocery, just a few bulbs lacking identification but packaged to entice.

Surprisingly quickly I found images online that matched my narcissus, read several stories about others who also searched for more information about this daffodil and concluded this is Narcissus x medioluteus.  (Please let me know if you doubt or have more information.)  It is a naturally-occurring hybrid between Narcissus poeticus and Narcissus tazetta. First discovered in France it is naturalized in many places now, including my state of North Carolina in the US.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

The common names I came across most frequently are cemetery ladies or twin sisters—twin sisters because they usually have a pair of flowers on each stem; cemetery ladies because they were often planted around graves in old cemeteries. That they normally exist in pairs threw me at first. I hadn’t at first noticed second buds piggy-backing on the stems, but yes, sure enough.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Other common names for this little daffodil are Primrose-peerless, April beauty, loving couples, pale narcissus,  two-flowered narcissus. The poignant “Cemetery ladies”is the one I shall most likely remember.

Twin Sisters, Cemetery Ladies (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

Division 13 – Daffodils distinguished solely by Botanical Name
Consists of the Species, Wild Variants, and Wild Hybrids found in natural daffodils.

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies / April Beauties (13 W-Y) (Narcissus x medioluteus)

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

I noticed some of the cerinthe is beginning to set seed. It’s the first time I’ve really seen it bloom so I’m not sure if cutting it will help it keep growing, but it seemed like a good choice to feature in this week’s vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Small stems of redbud and spirea were used as color accents.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

A Fenton handpainted glass vase echoes the colors displayed in the cerinthe and makes the redbud pop.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Materials
Flowers
Cercis canadensis (Eastern Redbud)
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Foliage
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Container
Hand painted Fenton Glass Vase – USA

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

Sights and Sounds At Easter

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

It is a beautiful Easter weekend in Chapel Hill. We will wait to see how the hydrangeas do but otherwise the garden survived a couple nights of below freezing temperatures. Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ is the second iris to appear this spring. It opened just before the cold snap but looked cheerful afterwards.

Soon gracefully nodding columbine flowers will be open everywhere in the garden, as well as in  many places beyond where it decided to wander. This first one to open is homesteading in a south-facing position next to the drive.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

This past week I have watched peonies rising with amazing speed. Peony ‘Coral Charm’ is always the most eager to bloom.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

I counted a dozen buds.

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

Here are a few flowers and a video with birdsong from yesterday’s Instagram post.

 

My husband and I went retro yesterday and colored eggs for the first time in many years. If you are looking for a creative way to be in the present moment, I recommend dye. Watching its transformation brings on a true sense of awe and wonder.  Wishing you all a wonderful Spring day on this Easter Sunday.

Easter Eggs