Author Archives: pbmgarden

About pbmgarden

Contemplating plants. Reforming my garden. Savoring peaceful moments. pbmgarden.blog

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

The white double hippeastrum (amaryllis) and the purple orchid may look familiar. The orchid appeared in Christmastide December 21, 2020; the hippeastrum in Blue Vase January 11, 2021; and jointly they formed the basis of Odds And Ends January 18, 2021. Redundant as they may be I am grateful to have these fabulous flowers in bloom for such a long period during an otherwise drab time of the year.  

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

I was amused last week by how many of you commented you own, but mostly don’t (or even never) use a mortar, and you were surprised to see one used as a floral container.  Each week as I search around for something to hold Monday flowers, pretty much any vessel is fair game to use as a vase. I didn’t plan today to try to use something unexpected as a container, but coincidentally my mother’s cookie jar, which normally sits on the same counter where the hippeastrum has been growing, is the inspiration for today’s design. These past weeks I kept wondering if I could transfer the plant into the cookie jar without breaking the stalks to give it a stronger foundation and yes, it was simple.  The bulb was originally planted in a 6 by 6.5 inch ornamental pail. Luckily the pail had a removable plastic insert so I was able to lift the insert and move the contents without disrupting roots, stems or flowers. The cookie jar is two inches taller than the original container and much heavier.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Neither the cookie jar’s turquoise color nor its shape worked quite as well as I had envisioned. But all in all the 2.5-foot towering arrangement carries an awesome sense of floral drama for this time of year, even if the height made it difficult to photograph. This image was taken looking down at it from the staircase in the foyer and so has foreshortening.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Placed upon the buffet the vase fills the dining room.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Materials
Flowers
Hippeastrum (amaryllis)
Orchid
Foliage
Lavender
Orchid
Container
Turquoise Cookie Jar, 8-inches high, 6 inches at mouth

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Odds And Ends

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Odds And Ends

In a fruitless search for hellebores in flower I happened upon the sasanquas nearing the end of their season. So with hellebores tediously slow to emerge this year, I selected a few stems of Yuletide, mostly for the dark green foliage, but eventually a flower made its way into Monday’s vase.

Already I had gathered sprigs of lavender and pieces of Daphne in bud to form a collar around the base of an orchid.

Daphne odora and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Purple Orchid and White Amaryllis

Three remaining flowers from last week’s cut Hippeastrum stalk opened Friday, but by Sunday they were already fading. I propped them up beneath the orchid to include in today’s presentation.

In A Vase On Monday – Odds And Ends

In A Vase On Monday – Odds And Ends

Hippeastrum (amaryllis)

Materials
Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Hippeastrum (amaryllis)
Orchid
Foliage
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Lavender
Container
Gray Marble Mortar

The container is from a mortar and pestle set made of marble that measures 4 inches high with a 4-inch diameter, a bit small for the height of the flowers.

I wish I had nestled the amaryllis down closer into the foliage but I was called away for a few minutes and in coming back to the vase later I did not take time to rework it. I think it would have balanced the design better by grounding or anchoring the weight of the largest flowers, allowing the smallest ones, the orchids, to float.  All in all though these odds and ends found around the house and garden are a soothing balm at middle January .

In A Vase On Monday – Odds And Ends

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week and feel free to join in with your own vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Vase

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

I previewed this hippeastrum (amaryllis) a few days ago before any flowers had fully opened. We received the pre-planted bulb a couple weeks before Christmas, a thoughtful surprise from our niece and her family. I love the color and detect a slight fragrance (almost pepperminty), which I’ve never experienced with these flowers before.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Vase

It has been fun watching the plant in action. To use as a cut flower it is recommended to cut the stem when the bud is at marshmallow stage, before the flower has opened, but generally it should be okay to harvest at a later stage. Three of my six buds are now in full bloom with the center-facing one actually starting to fade slightly.  I made the cut about an inch above the bulb and placed the stem in water for conditioning for several hours before using. Now the bulb can concentrate on nurturing the two remaining stalks.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Vase

Stately and serene, the lidded ceramic jar is one of my favorite vases for holding white flowers. It was a gift from my daughter so I send her a little smile whenever I use it.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Vase

Materials
Flowers
Hippeastrum (amaryllis)
Foliage
Arum Italicum
Container
Dark blue matte ceramic jar (by NC potter Julie A. Hunkins, c. 2000)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

From The Archives—Meditation Circle

In 2001 this garden was established with many passalong plants from my Wave Road home and by 2011 the garden had long since become my sanctuary. In keeping with that I created a formal meditation space.

From day one the labyrinth fulfilled its contemplative objective and added a strong design focal point to the garden. Seen here four months after completion, the meditation circle that first year was planted in Iberis, penstemon, thyme and angelonia, with the odd color but budget-friendly choice of marigolds marking either side of the entrance.

Meditation Circle July 31, 2011

A Decade Of Sharing The Garden

Hippeastrum

The garden dates to 2001 but I began a garden blog on January 7, 2011, ten years ago. I am rather glad it began not on the day prior, as January 6, 2021 shall live in infamy for the insurrection and mob attacks on the Capitol of the United States of America.  On a date which brought such dishonor to this country, in the ensuing years I would feel it pretty insignificant to write about seeds, plants, achievements or goals for my minor little garden.  I have read explanations but have never understood what would make anyone support the unqualified, supremely offensive lesser being who was voted to lead America four years ago. That he received more than his own pitiful vote in the 2020 election is a mystery and a sad reflection on the state of this country. America will be dealing with the aftermath of his lies for many years to come.

So I am grateful my blogging anniversary does not fall on January 6. I will concentrate on gardening once more, but I will remember that date.

Hippeastrum

There is no peace in the garden today, but there will be again. At some point I wrote these words for my About page: Each day in my garden is both a history of my life and a fresh beginning.

Hippeastrum

Spring will return to the garden. Thanks for visiting pbmGarden, for sharing your support,  knowledge and friendship.

Hippeastrum

In A Vase On Monday – January With Gold

In A Vase On Monday – January With Gold

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens. We have entered a new year but as the garden has offered up no new flowers to welcome 2021, I returned to Yuletide camellias.

In A Vase On Monday – January With Gold

To try to create something different I selected a pair of small black vases painted with gold flowers that once belonged to my maternal grandmother.

In A Vase On Monday – January With Gold

I suspect the little glass vases were mementos picked up by my uncle during his naval career travels, but I have no way of knowing. For the past week the days have been so cold and dreary and the daylight so weak the touches of gold and the deep yellow centers on the camellias are the brightest things around.

Materials
Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Foliage
Gardenia
Lavender
Container
Vase Pair, Glass with gold floral decoration

In A Vase On Monday – January With Gold

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Happy New Year 2021

Passalong Rose

Undeniably 2020 was a troubled year of great suffering in the world. I imagine as in any year we all saw some measure of sorrow—longings, pain, disappointments. My wish for you is that moment to moment, inside the garden and out, this new year shall bring into your life many reasons for gratitude.

Om.  Peace, Peace, Peace!

Singing Bowls

 

2020 Garden Retrospective

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Looking Back At 2020 In The Garden

The first two months were dominated by hellebores and winter daphne. Then I posted Middle March 2020, mentioning how much I missed seeing my Gentle Yoga students that morning.

Middle March Blooms

It was a changed world. The wellness center where I taught closed that week temporarily and I used my reawakening spring garden as backdrop for several meditation videos.

Southwest Corner – Iris, Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Days turned into months.  Although the wellness center eventually re-opened with some virtual and some limited in-person classes, out of caution I have not yet returned to the studio.  And though for now my yoga classes no longer exist I have kept my teaching schedule on my calendar. Nostalgia? Optimism? Inertia?

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) and Stock

With teaching on hold I turned more fiercely to the garden and, as probably true for many of you, it became my refuge.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

The garden brought frustrations but those were greatly outweighed by rewards. Growing and nurturing seeds and plants connected me with nature and beauty.

Hemerocallis (Daylily) from Mercers’ in Fayetteville, NC

And sharing the garden through this blog kept open an avenue for relationships—keeping me grounded, bringing in joy. Thank you for playing along.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

In A Vase On Monday

Throughout the past year searches in my garden sometimes yielded precious few flowers from which to fashion weekly Monday vases; however, frequently there were ample flowers—even a choice; and occasionally an armful of flowers made for a joyous bounty. This is one of my favorites.

Mother’s Day – May 11, 2020

I have assembled a gallery of In A Vase On Monday contributions for the entire past year. This is one other favorite.

Purple And Other Flora -June 8, 2020

Butterflies

Between May 30 and November 16, 2020, a variety of butterflies graced the garden, beginning with this gorgeous male monarch.

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

The butterflies I saw this year are not particularly unusual in my area but some I observed for the first time, including this Viceroy.

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

I was particularly thrilled to see this Pipevine Swallowtail. Last year (2019) was the first time I had seen one.

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

More butterflies and other pollinators were featured in Garden Benefits, Butterfly Sightings Today, October’s Beginning, Garden Delights and other random posts, as well as on  iNaturalist.

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

A Week Of Blooms

In November I began creating a retrospective of sorts for this past gardening year, sifting through hundreds of photographs so I could join Cathy at Words and Herbs in sharing in A Week Of Blooms. She suggested it might be just the thing to dispel the gloom of increasingly dark days as we headed toward winter—and it worked. It was fun seeing flowers from other gardens and I enjoyed creating these seven daily entries.

  1. Anemone from February 27, 2020
  2. Snapdragons in the northern border and penstemon in the meditation circle
  3. Southern Side Path in April
  4. Three weeks of Peonies
  5. Shasta daisies
  6. Dahlias May to November
  7. Irises

I especially enjoyed looking back at the irises, the floral highlight of my spring garden.

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

So many plants have yet to be mentioned but they will come around again. The cycle of the garden begins again.

In A Vase On Monday – Late December

In A Vase On Monday – Late December

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

After some very cold nights with temperatures as low as 19°F. still on Sunday morning I managed to find my patch of alyssum still blooming at the base of a couple of large flower pots.

Alyssum – December 17, 2020

I imagined filling a tiny container with the miniature purplish-magenta blooms to finish out the year of Monday vases. The alyssum didn’t prove easy to collect or work with so I was glad I had also checked out the Yuletide camellia. Though many blooms were browned by the cold blasts of the past week, a few fresh flowers had opened.

In A Vase On Monday – Late December

Alyssum

Today’s resulting vase strayed from my initial concept—more of a hodge-podge—making a quick wrap-up for this year of vases. See the entire 2020 collection of Monday vases.

In A Vase On Monday – Late December

Camellia, Alyssum and Berries

Silvered Lichen

Materials
Flowers
Alyssum
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Foliage
Crape Myrtle stem with lichen
Liriope
Container
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Late December

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

A Christmas Card

Front of card

Since I was a child I have loved the custom of sending Christmas cards.

This year it seemed especially important to extend this tradition, to reach out to say hello to a few family and friends and wish them “Peace and Good Health In The Coming Year.”

Each holiday season I think I should design and send out cards featuring something from my garden, but many Christmases have come and gone without that happening—until this year, 2020.

I used a watercolor effect on a photo from an “In A Vase On Monday” arrangement for the cover. Inside the card opposite the message, I used the actual image.

Inside

For the back I chose a gladiolus, lilies and a dahlia in holiday colors.

Back

I am sharing the card today to send you and yours traditional wishes for the season.

Peace and Good Health In The Coming Year

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

Prepared on Sunday during pouring down rain, many ingredients in this week’s offering may look familiar. Instead of trekking outdoors to hunt for materials I salvaged what I could from last week’s vase: winter daphne, lavender, dogwood. Refreshed with the addition of several anthuriums gleaned from a house plant, along with a couple of stems of poinsettia,  the vase has shifted into holiday mode. I also added leaves from a beefsteak begonia.

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

Placed into a silver tray dotted with red and silver holiday ornaments and paired with an orchid full of rich purple, the repurposed arrangement celebrates winter solstice* today and is ready for the countdown to Christmas.

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

Despite the strangeness of this stay-at-home year and the challenging family health issues we faced in recent month, we find ourselves full of gratitude and joy. My husband is improving. During his illness and recovery we have been the recipients of an outpouring of generosity, love and kindness—cards, emails, calls, meals, offers of assistance, and as the holiday season swings ’round, delicious desserts. The poinsettia and the orchid are new this year, each gifts from neighborhood friends, as was the anthurium last year.

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

Amidst the foliage I included one tiny symbolic sprig of balsam fir at the base, clipped from a lovely door swag wreath sent by former across-the-street Wave Road neighbors.

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

Materials
Flowers
Anthurium
Orchid
Poinsettia
Foliage
Balsam fir
Begonia ‘Erythrophylla’ (Beefsteak Begonia)
Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)
Container
Silver Gallery Tray with holiday baubles

In A Vase On Monday – Christmastide

It is a gift also to have you visit my blog. I appreciate your interest, advice and support throughout the year. Hope you are making or finding reasons to smile each day.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

*December Solstice (Winter Solstice) is on Monday, December 21, 2020 at 5:02 am in Chapel Hill. In terms of daylight, this day is 4 hours, 53 minutes shorter than on June Solstice.

 

November And December Collages

This summer I began participating in an Instagram meme hosted by Amy @newgatenarcissi with the idea of sharing a monthly collage of the garden. November came and went without its due representation. Yesterday I drew up its solution and for good measure completed one for December as well. December’s big surprise was finding Alyssum still blooming happily yesterday, despite many nights below freezing.

I may continue creating the collages only occasionally in the new year. They are time-consuming but I enjoy making them.

November 2020

November 2020

Starting top row, left to right:
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly weed)
Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)
Gardenia Hip – Gardenia jasminoides
Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)
Button Chrysanthemum
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)
Zinnia

December 2020

December 2020

Starting top row, left to right:
Anthurium
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Alyssum (3)
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Oak Leaves and Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
In A Vase On Monday – December Etude (2)
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ (after a freeze)
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Almost Wordless Wednesday – Camellias In Situ

Annette of Personal Eden wondered what my sasanquas look like growing in situ as opposed to indoors in a vase. The shrubs are utilitarian, hiding utilities from the street view and yes, we are this close to the neighbors’ drive so they have to be kept trimmed.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’ screen gas utlities next to house on north side. Shrubs have intermingled over the years. They are tightly pruned to keep them from overtaking the neighbors’ drive. Beyond the red ‘Yuletide’ are several gardenias (not in bloom this time of year).

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

 

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

At mid-December the temperatures are mild again, nearly 70 degrees. In my garden a fall-blooming iris strangely has developed fat buds again, but only camellia sasanquas are flowering.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ and Daphne odora

Having relied heavily on camellias for vase material for the past many years I am finding them decidedly uninspiring this year. Nevertheless I collected a few Yuletide flowers Sunday morning, but then changing directions I challenged myself to focus on foliage for a vase study this week.

Colorful oak leaves and dogwood buds were the main focus supported by fresh green Winter Daphne form the basis of the design.

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

With the addition of the red flowers the arrangement took on an offbeat holiday look.

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

Buds of Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Materials
Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Foliage
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)
Quercus (oak)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Container
Solimene Vietri ceramic bowl

In A Vase On Monday – December Etude

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

The camellias in last week’s vase were short-lived but the remaining materials persist and reduction leads to simplicity. Shifted into another container the arum and gardenia foliage provide shape and structure for a new design, accented by two stems of anthurium. A single white cyclamen flower is the only new element.

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

Materials
Flowers
Anthurium
Cyclamen
Foliage
Arum italicum
Gardenia
Container
Hand-thrown ceramic piece from Seagrove Pottery (olive-artichoke), artist unknown

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

In A Vase On Monday – Reduction

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

There are two sasanquas in my garden along the north side of the house. They were planted a couple years after we moved here as replacements for wax myrtles (part of the original landscaping package that came with the house.  The wax myrtles had unceremoniously become upended after a minor wind storm.) These camellias just happened to be the ones I found at the nursery the day I went to shop: Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ and ‘Yuletide’.  At the same time I bought one hybrid Camellia ‘Coral Delight’ (C. japonica × C. saluenensis) that blooms early spring. I had beginner’s luck with these three camellias—none I have planted since have survived.  The rest of the garden is too sunny and harsh and probably too dry.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

The two sasanquas provide flowers for the Thanksgiving table and continue well into January. ‘Hana-Jiman’ began this year around October 24, 2020 and ‘Yuletide’ around November 4, 2020. I find them difficult to arrange. Often they are simply floated in a shallow dish where the entire flower can be easily viewed, but this week I attempted to mix them with greenery and force them into a more complex design.

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

Look quickly. Twice already I have found the floor covered with camellia petals. Soon the foliage and anthurium harvested from a house plant may be all that remains.

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

Materials
Flowers
Anthurium
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Foliage
Arum italicum
Camellia sasanqua
Gardenia
Vase
Black-glazed ceramic square, floral pin

In A Vase On Monday – Camellias

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Sunday Journal – Names For Two Irises

This is a record-keeping entry, following up on my iris flowers from yesterday.  Sweetbay identified two of my passalong irises for which I am very grateful: Crimson King and Helen Collingwood.  Thanks Sweetbay!

These are among the irises my Wave Road neighbor Henrietta gave me between late 1970s – early 1980s. She received them from her mother who had obtained them from a friend who grew them for a local florist in her hometown (Henderson, Hendersonville? NC)—true passalongs! I brought them to this garden in 2001.

As much as I love irises I do not really understand the categories. I have been calling all the bearded irises “Tall Bearded” although one of these is “Intermediate Bearded.” Someday maybe I’ll learn more about them but for now I am saving some information on these two irises. The descriptions are quoted from The American Iris Society’s Iris Encyclopedia.

(IB) ‘Crimson King’

Iris ‘Crimson King’

Iris ‘Crimson King’

(Barr and Sons, 1893). (Germanica). IB, Early bloom. Color Code-R7D.

From Treholme Gardens catalog 1928: CRIMSON KING 89 (Hallock) E. 82 G. 87 32″ E. Same coloring as Kochii but the rich deep purple flowers are larger, the stalks taller and the growth more open. A very desirable flower. 25c.

Cornell Extension Bulletin #112: “Color effect an intense violet-purple, self. Standards pansy violet, lighter to yellowish on claw and wavy along edge. falls cotinga purple, almost velvety in texture. The veining is boldly spaced on the whitish outer haft, while those on Kochii are not so prominent. Its fragrance is very good, its color very intense, and its spathe valves deeply tinged. The persistent green foliage is attractive in winter. Rating 89.”

Royal Iris Gardens 1933: 83. 30″. beautiful deep red purple. As deep as Kochii but redder. Tall, floriferous and a good grower.

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

Iris ‘Helen Collingwood’

(TB) ‘Helen Collingwood’

‘Helen Collingwood’. (Kenneth D. Smith, 1949) TB. Midseason to late bloom. Color Class-R3D, height 40″. ‘Extravaganza’ X ‘Louise Blake’. Honorable Mention 1950, Award of Merit 1952. Smith 1950.

From AIS Bulletin #117, April 1950. Introducing HELEN COLLINGWOOD (1949). A truly brilliant creation in the neglecta class. Well branched 40 inch stalks with light lavender standards and brilliant violet purple falls. Entirely different. 4 branches. Late midseason. $25.00. K.D. Smith.

From Iris Test Garden Catalog, 1955: HELEN COLLINGWOOD. (K. Smith, ’49). M. (Extravaganza x Louise Blake). Beautiful, superb neglecta. Almost an amoena –will be highly useful for hybridizing, surely. H. M. 1950. Award Merit, ’52. $6.00.

From Cooley’s Gardens catalog for 1955: “A very brilliant Iris in the neglecta class. Standards are light lavender, the falls bright violet-purple .. a decided contrast. Stalks are 40 inches tall, sturdy and vigorous.”

‘Helen Collingwood’ is a very hardy variety, well known to be a good survivor of neglect and hence likely to be passed around over the decades. It helps that she is quite lovely and a ready bloomer, giving her much garden value. Understandably she often shows up looking for a name. — MikeUnser – 2014-05-11

 

A Week of Flowers – Day Seven

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Since Sunday Cathy of Words and Herbs has been hosting a week of flowers. Garden bloggers have embraced the chance to post one or more photos a day of our flowers and gardens to brighten this week. Looking back at my 2020 garden has been an interesting exercise, remembering plants that did well, or didn’t, and making plans. From seeing others’ shared favorites I have gleaned ideas for next year.

It was hard to decide what to share today but I settled on some of my beloved irises. Most of these are passalongs so I am not sure of the names.

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Iris

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Kathleen’s Japanese Iris

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Louisiana Iris ?

Thanks so much for stopping by. As we wrap up this special week do visit Cathy to see what she and others found to bring you cheer and smiles.

A Week of Flowers – Day Six

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ -June 20, 2020

Since Sunday Cathy of Words and Herbs has been hosting a week of flowers. Garden bloggers have embraced the chance to post one or more photos a day of our flowers and gardens to brighten our week.

As a novice dahlia grower I am just discovering what other gardeners have known for years. They have a long bloom season and are great cut flowers. Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ began flowering May 27 and dahlias proved to be the mainstay of my summer garden only to improve as days and nights grew cooler in autumn.  I thought they would keep going until frost, which for us happened November 17, two weeks later than average, but in fact the dahlias decided on their own to stop flowering a week earlier. Next year I plan to try different varieties and to learn to stake them more seriously.

Dahlia ‘David Howard’ -June 20, 2020

Dahlia ‘David Howard’ July 25, 2020

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ August 5, 2020

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ September 11, 2020

Dahlia -September 15, 2020

Dahlia -September 15, 2020

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ September 25, 2020

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ September 25, 2020

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’ September 29, 2020

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’ October 3, 2020

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ October 13, 2020

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’ -October 13, 2020

Dahlia -October 13, 2020

Visit Cathy to see what she and others are finding to bring us cheer and smiles.

A Week of Flowers – Day Five

It is Thanksgiving in America today and also five days into A Week of Flowers hosted by Cathy of Words and Herbs. This week gardeners are posting one or more photos a day of our flowers and gardens to spread cheer.

In early July a large grouping of shasta daisies lit up the garden.

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Happy Thanksgiving. May you be happy and healthy and find peace.

A Week of Flowers – Day Four

It has been fun joining Cathy of Words and Herbs this week in posting a week of flowers. The concept is to share one or more photos a day of our flowers and gardens to spread a little joy.

For Day Four I am remembering the lift brought by peonies for three weeks beginning the last week of April through midMay.

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)

Paeonia lactiflora ‘Sarah Bernhardt’

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

Paeonia ‘Madame Emile Debatene’

For more smiles and flowers visit Cathy to see what blooms she and other gardeners chose today.

A Week of Flowers – Day Three

Cathy of Words and Herbs gardens in Bavaria and recently suggested posting a week of flowers, one or more photos a day of our flowers and gardens to brighten and cheer us all.

For Day Three I went back to April to show a glimpse of the Southern Side Path. This garden is a narrow strip running alongside the garage giving access to the main garden in back. (You can see the neighbors’ gate on the left, ours on the right.) The yellow iris is a particularly fragrant pass-along iris I’ve had since the late 1970s, brought to this garden when we moved here in 2001. Just before the entrance gate is Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ which bloomed particularly well this spring.

 

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

This is the view looking up the path toward the street. Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’ also had an exceptional year

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Visit Cathy’s Words and Herbs blog for more flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

This past week brought below freezing temperatures for the first time this autumn, a couple of weeks later than usual. I rescued ginger lily and zinnia flowers ahead of the big event and tucked them into an Ikebana vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

In A Vase On Monday – Zinnias With Ginger Lily

Materials
Flowers
Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)
Zinnia
Foliage
Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)
Container
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Triangle Blue Wave (6.5 W x 6.5 L x 2H)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.