In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

Every Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase with items collected from our gardens.

It is easy to become distracted in the spring garden. The only thing I knew I wanted in today’s vase was cerinthe and then when I went out to gather materials this morning I completely forgot to get some, realizing the omission only after this vase was assembled. So much for intention; I’ve come to appreciate flexibility and resiliency just as much.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

A single Coral Charm peony was available this morning. At its feet was a large spread of Stachys byzantina, fuzzy lamb’s ears, glistening in the sunlight. The combination was serendipitously satisfying in its contrast of texture and form.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

A touch of recently planted Purple Bicolor Sweet William, along with hellebores heading to seed, and bulbous seed pods of summer snowflakes fill out the design.

Dianthus ‘Purple Bicolor’ (Sweet William)

Seeds forming on hellebores

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake) seed pods

Materials
Flowers
Dianthus ‘Purple Bicolor’ (Sweet William)
Helleborus x hybridus
Paeonia lactiflora ‘Coral Charm’ (Coral Charm Peony)
Foliage
Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake) Seedheads
Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)
Container
Textured, incised ceramic pedestal vase, rice or bone color. 5×6-inches, with floral pin holder.
Black stones

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

Had to include one more image. Since bringing the peony inside it is already opening more fully.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

Have a wonderful week. Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting each week. Visit her blog to see her vase and check out those of other gardeners from around the world.

36 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Spring Intention

  1. Donna Donabella

    Oh wow! I love that peony and all the foliage. How exquisite….the muted hellebore and dark sumptuous dianthus. Perfection!

    Reply
  2. Katie

    Beautiful composition! That coral charm peony makes me so excited to see if the ones I planted might bloom this year. Love it in combination with the hellebore and how it coaxes those subtle hues to shine from its petals.

    Reply
  3. Cathy

    I thought you might have a peony or two today! You are right about the stachys, which worked really well with it – but I am intrigued by the seedheads of the leucojum as I don’t think I have ever seen these before..do I cut mine down before they get to this stage, I wonder? A good reminder about the effectiveness of Sweet William too – must sow some this year

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I planned to wait until there were more peonies open but decided to enjoy this first one indoors after all. I’m not sure I’ve ever noticed the leucojum seedheads either. They were an afterthought as I passed by.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        I have inpsected mine since, and there is nothing yet – I suppose they have to be pollinated, and perhaps they aren’t always…?

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy, the leucojum has been a vigorous grower once it got established so I decided to grab those seedheads to keep them from germinating. They worked out well today.

      Reply
  4. Kris P

    This arrangement is utterly charming, Susie. Of course, any arrangement including a peony would grab my attention but I love both the color and textural mix in this one independent of that spectacular bloom. The seedheads are a subtle and unexpected touch.

    Reply
  5. tonytomeo

    Goodness! Peony already! I happen to be in the Pacific Northwest for a few more days, so have noticed peony beginning to grow around the neighborhood. I do not bother with them at home because winter weather is (normally) too mild for them. They (normally) do not get sufficient chill.

    Reply
  6. smallsunnygarden

    How perfect–even if your intentions were elsewhere! 😉 I love the textures provided by the snowflake seedpods and the Stachys foliage. I’m hoping to find some Stachys byzantina and try it here, as it almost survived in my Phoenix garden. The peony, of course, is splendid!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you. I saw Stachys featured on Gardeners’ World this past week so it especially caught my eye this morning. It grows easily here. I hope you’ll be successful growing it in your new garden.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Eliza, ‘Coral Charm’ is a peony I just luck on at a garden center I suppose. At time of purchase I had know idea of the enjoyment it would bring.

      Reply
  7. Linda Brazill

    You just always seem to create a memorable bouquet. And it’s not just because you have a nice selection of flowers. You have a great eye for color and texture. Those Hellebore seedheads with the fuzzy gray leaves is heavenly.

    Reply
  8. Anna Higgins

    That’s a rather lovely peony Suzie. Lamb’s Ears disappeared from my garden a good few years ago and I should try to replace them. Not only attractive but most tactile too. I might have had cerinthe in my vase this week but a bitterly cold spell in December saw all my seedlings off. My March sown ones are still very much babies.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Lamb’s Ears is one of those old-fashioned plants I’ve always had in my garden. Later in the season it will get raggedy but this week it’s just in its prime. I find cerinthe hard to grow but fortunately it reseeds–such a treasure.

      Reply
  9. Cathy

    I suspect you were so ‘charmed’ by Coral Charm and the Stachys that the Cerinthe slipped your mind. 😉 Your vase is still lovely though, and the fading Hellebore is a great match for your peony. Love the Snowflake seedheads, And the last photo is gorgeous! I actually found Coral Charm, finally in stock again at nurseries this spring, but didn’t buy it in the end as it cost 40 euros!! Plants have become so expensive here!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I suspect you’re right! I’ve forgotten how much I paid for Coral Charm (It’s just better that way) but it has been a strong player in the garden and in vases. I’e had some peonies given to me by people who were dividing theirs that have grown easily, but I’ve bought quite a few that were bare-root and didn’t do well. I hate to chalk everything up to luck in my garden but it is a big factor.

      Reply
  10. Beth@PlantPostings

    Oh, that is SO beautiful. I was just about to sign off for the night, and then I decided to check out your blog. Your arrangements always cheer me up, and this one is so graceful and calming. Thank you!

    Reply

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