Peacock Orchid

Peacock Orchid (Gladiolus acidanthera)

Yesterday I noticed flowers had formed on the Peacock Orchids. This is the first year I’ve grown them so wasn’t sure what to expect. An Iris family member, the foliage is similar to gladiolus (unlike my glads these stalks stand quite erect).

Peacock Orchid (Gladiolus acidanthera)

The first opened this morning revealing a gently nodding flower, white with tinges of pink on the tips of the petals and a dramatic maroon center. The flowers seem rather delicate, but I read they like hot afternoon sun so they should find themselves at home in this garden.

Peacock Orchid (Gladiolus acidanthera)

Peacock Orchid (Gladiolus acidanthera)

15 thoughts on “Peacock Orchid

  1. tonytomeo

    Gee, I had put off procuring these for a long time. I almost never purchase anything, since I prefer everything in my garden to have history. Then, a neighbor gave me two pots of these! Of course, I was very pleased to finally get some, and particularly since the arrived by the preferred means. I am very pleased with them, and am surprised by their mild fragrance.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you have a cooperative neighbor who could pass along some of these. Have to admit I didn’t notice a scent, but now I’ll go check!

      Reply
  2. Eliza Waters

    I love these flowers for that mahogany eye and delicate scent. I grew them once, but they took so long to flower, it wasn’t long before frost cut them down. Our climate and growing season has changed, being a month longer now, so it might be worth another try.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Eliza, I have to admit I didn’t notice a scent but I’m looking forward to checking that out. It is sad the climate is so different nowadays, but guess we all need to reconsider what to grow and when.

      Reply
  3. Kris P

    It’s a lovely flower. I tried growing the bulbs once and just got a few blooms. They never returned. I hope yours live long and prosper.

    Reply
  4. Pauline

    I grew Acidanthera for a few years, but we have to take them in for the winter as they aren’t hardy here and one year I forgot! Maybe I should try again and not be so forgetful this time.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Pauline I admire your energy. I’m hoping these acidanthera will overwinter. I read of one local gardener’s experience that they have come back each year. She advised heavy mulch for winter to help them through. I find them charming so I might add a few more anyway next year. Have a good week.

      Reply

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