In A Vase On Monday – Pass Alongs

In A Vase On Monday – Pass Alongs

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Pass Alongs

A bright spot in 2020 was a gift of tall bearded irises I had admired on the Instagram feed of petalsandwingsimages. The rhizomes arrived in September but made no flowers last year. This week they revealed themselves, dark inky blue buds opened into delicate lavender confections. I had made a note that the foliage was variegated but it no longer seems to be. The irises are lightly scented, almost sweet.

Tall bearded iris – passalong from petalsandwingsimages. Japanese Roof Iris in background

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Planted nearby are shorter Japanese roof iris. These beardless iris were rescued for me one summer a couple decades ago by a friend whose master gardener neighbor was dividing and sharing his. The fringed crest is white, falls and standards are purple.

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Through the years my mother’s first cousin, Virgie, shared many garden plants with me and when we moved to this house in 2001 I brought along quite a few. One treasured pass along is a rose that she, my mother, and my grandmother all grew. The first flower opened Sunday, just in time to be included in my vase of pass alongs this week.

Virgie’s Rose

Materials
Flowers
Dianthus Ideal Select Mix
Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)
Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)
Virgie’s Rose
Foliage
Helleborus
Container
Stoneware pitcher glazed with bands of cream, green, blue. (pitcher and 4 cups, Pringle Pottery, North Carolina, circa 1977)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Tall bearded iris)

Thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for encouraging us to create and share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are enjoying this week.

28 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Pass Alongs

  1. greentapestry

    The irises are such a sumptuous colour Suzie and the rose too. Plants from family members and friends are most special indeed. I do like that expression ‘pass along’ – one that we should adopt on this side of the pond.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Anna, I agree getting plants from others makes them even more special–treasured reminders that come each year. Don’t remember where I learned the phrase “pass along” but it does capture the idea nicely.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Yes, clearly we in the UK are very taken with the ‘passalong’ terminology and should adopt it ourselves – and of course Anna is right in saying that it makes the plants even more special. But what on earth is a Japanese roof iris I wonder and where did it get its name? I prefer these non-bearded ones, but your jugful of mixed irises is stunning, creating a very different effect from irises in a minimal ikebana arrangement – and the cheeky little rose does not seem out of place with its purple friends

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Judy. I need to divide my irises and have been told to wait until mid-July, but I think I’ll be more likely to actually do it now before it gets so hot.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Funny you should ask! I nearly always use passalong as one word, although in searches it seems to come back as two. Just decided two looked better for the title! The rose is beginning to open more–it’s a special memory.

      Reply
  3. tonytomeo

    THIS is precisely why I have a rule against purchasing certain perennials, particularly iris. (However, there is one that I would purchase if I ever find it to be available, but I won’t.)

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, they’re easily obtainable through friends. Well, what’s the one iris you’d like to have so much you’d be willing to buy it?

      Reply

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