In A Vase On Monday – March Mingle

In A Vase On Monday – March Mingle

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – March Mingle

I gathered flowers from the garden on Friday ahead of predicted storms on Saturday and deep freezing temperatures Sunday morning.  I knew the camellia that has just begun flowering could suffer damage so it was the first stop.

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

I hadn’t grown hyacinths in several years so was excited this week when they began unfolding. I brought in five to enjoy. Their fragrance is nearly overpowering, even from the foyer where this week’s arrangement sits.

Hyacinth Orientalis Shades of Blue

The hyacinths along with the foliage and aged hellebores create one of my favorite color studies—a rich, yet peaceful, combination of blues and greens.

Greens And Blues (or Purples)

Bright sprigs of white spiraea help create contrast against the dark hyacinths.

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea) and Hyacinth Orientalis Shades of Blue

Materials
Flowers
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Foliage
Gardenia jasminoides
Hippeastrum
Container
Black metal suiban. 4 x 9.5 x 6.5 inches. Japan.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Visible from the side angle, at the back right corner and at front center are a couple of pieces of cerinthe that overwintered in the meditation circle. The plant had seemingly shaken off the strains of winter and was just starting to bloom. Fingers crossed it will pull through the weekend’s weather challenge.

In A Vase On Monday – March Mingle

Thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are enjoying this week.

30 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – March Mingle

  1. Chris Mousseau

    I also love the colour combination here as well, And that long arching leaf – makes the arrangement resemble on of those feathered hats worn in the forties or fifties. Or twenties.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Chris! As soon as I photographed these flowers I realized that leaf could be read different ways. Reminds me now of a brontosaurus model our daughter had growing up.😀

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The camellia made it a few days but I finally had to remove it this morning. Hoping that our two nights of deep freeze didn’t ruin all the buds.

      Reply
  2. Annette

    So beautiful, Susie, every flower is perfectly placed. Your vase reminds me of a ship that has set sail. What is the Latin name of the hummingbird cerinthe? Have a good week 🌷

    Reply
  3. Kris P

    I love the contrast between the purple-blue blooms and that exquisite Camellia, Susie. My Camellia ‘Taylor’s Perfection” has been the saddest loss to this year’s dry and overly warm conditions, which have put an end to whatever hopes I had of adding another Camellia to my small collection. Instead, I’ll just enjoy yours.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      This camellia bush isn’t looking too healthy, so I’m surprised how many buds have formed. (Learned a tip from Monty Don last night to lighten the earth around its outer edges so I’ll give that a try.)

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    That dish is such an asset, isn’t it Susie?! What an intriguing mixture of blooms you have used today and as always you have combined colour and form to great effect. I look forward to being able to cut hyacinths for a vase but am waiting for those that had been replanted outside to flower

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, the new dish gives a strong foundation. I’m really enjoying it. I was afraid the hyacinths would be damaged by the deep cold Sat and Sun but the ones I left in ground are looking fine. They are nice but their fragrance is very strong.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        And like these narcissi, I expect they maintain their fragrance intensity – I certainly can’t escape the fragrance of these narcissi here unless I leave the room!

  5. theshrubqueen

    interesting the interpretations, brontosaurus and millinery? I like the shapes, colors and textures the blue and coral really offset the spirea – I think you are going to have to keep it.

    Reply
  6. Frogend_dweller

    I adore those blue hyacinths. It’s the slight flush of red in them that makes them so appealing I think. The close up shot of the green/blue/white combo is very effective. Lovely!

    Reply
  7. tonytomeo

    Are hyacinth reliably perennial? I do not grow them because I had not believed that they are reliably perennial here, or, if they were reliably perennial, that they would bloom reliably with minimal chill. However, there are a few that bloom annually within one of our landscapes. Someone put them out there singly years ago. They look lonely out there, so I have considered adding more of (hopefully) the same blue color.

    Reply
  8. Donna Donabella

    Love the contrasting color…especially the coral camellia and those deep purple hyacinths. Perfect choice of flowers.

    Reply
  9. Cathy

    The camellia is of course lovely, but I adore those whispy spiraea stems and the hellebore on the edge of the vase on the left that makes me think of a boat, with the hyacinths as sails. 😃 Fabulous!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I enjoyed your sailboat interpretation. This week our state art museum is hosting “Art In Bloom”, an event where floral designers use flowers to interpret works of art from the museum’s collection. I wish I’d based this vase on a painting but it just evolved.

      Reply

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