In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

I think of early spring as the appropriate time for pink flowers but today autumn pinks star in this November vase. Sheffield chrysanthemums have been generously shared among neighbors in our community. I am not sure which homeowner planted them first but they thrive here and make good pass-alongs. Some are quite apricot but mine are definitely pink. Butterflies are said to like them but when I was gathering flowers for today’s vase,  bees were finding them delicious.

Chrysanthemum ‘Sheffield Pink’

On the north side of our house Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana Jiman’ is in full bloom. Its delicate flowers carry a lovely scent.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana Jiman’

Clematis ‘Niobe’ has been reblooming robustly for a month or so. It spills over the scalloped edge of the Fenton glass vase, drawing the eye to hand painted floral decoration.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Fenton Painted Glass Vase

Materials
Flowers
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana Jiman’
Chrysanthemum ‘Sheffield Pink’
Clematis ‘Niobe’
Foliage
Container
Hand painted Fenton Glass Vase – USA

In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

Thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

22 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Pink In Painted Glass

    1. tonytomeo

      Yes, I was about to say that. I do not bother growing them here (although there are at least two at work) because they bloom only in spring, and then get roasted for summer.

      Reply
  1. Cathy

    That pretty vase is perfect to set these off, and what a lovely shade of pink they are – what do the plants themselves look like…?! Any reason why they are called ‘Sheffield chrysanthemums?

    Reply
  2. Kris P

    Although pink is far from my favorite color, I’ve long admired the Sheffield Chrysanthemums, which I’m acquainted with only through blog posts. The addition of the dark-flowered Clematis provides just the right accent, preventing the arrangement from becoming too sugar-sweet. And that vase was made for that arrangement, Susie.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Kris, I’m not big on pink either but seem to have ended up with lots of pink. I agree the clematis helped it from being too pink. The vase was a gift from one of my sisters, very special.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    I love pink Chrysanthemums and yours are no exception. What a delicate shade of pink. The other shades look beautiful alongside too, especially the Camellia which really stands out. 😃

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Amy. Hadn’t heard “Fall Daisy Mum” before but makes perfect sense. No one in the neighborhood ever had a name for them, so I identified them by seeing them on blogs and deciding that’s what they were. Not completely reliable but I do think they are. Missouri Botanical Garden website calls them C. ‘Hillside Sheffield Pink’ and describes them as apricot pink.

      Reply
  4. Noelle M

    I can imagine how lovely your garden and those of your neighbours as the Chrysanthemums have their moment. The flowers you chose including that lovely rich dark plum clematis Niobe are perfect partners in that unusual vase.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. My sister purchased the vase new a few years back. I can’t remember exactly how long ago. It has an old-fashioned look to it, doesn’t it.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.