In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

Mini Carnations purchased for last week’s book club meeting help flesh out today’s arrangement of mostly dahlias. The dahlias are slow to come into their own this year but I think the zinnias will steal the show anyway this summer.

In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

Materials
Flowers
Mini-Carnation (Dianthus)
Dahlia Ball ‘Petra’s Wedding’
Dahlia Border Decorative ‘Gallery Pablo’
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’ (Butterfly Gaura)
Salvia yangii (Russian Sage), previously known as Pervskia atriplicifolia
Zinnia
Foliage
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Container
Ceramic Urn Stamped “Vintage 4”

In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

24 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – August Bouquet

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Chris. I have been experimenting with the asymmetrical design, but have a ways to go. It takes a lot of flowers and my garden is not producing many yet. Hope your dahlias step up soon!

      Reply
  1. Cathy

    That is a bouquet and a half, Susie, and you have ‘filled it out’ brilliantly – Cathy’s comment above sums up your skill briliantly. Thank you so much for sharing it with us all

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Cathy! The dahlias still have rather thick short stems, despite me cutting them back earlier to encourage branching and longer stems. So I was glad to have those carnations to be able to extend the design outward. Thanks for hosting.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Malc. I believe the dahlias would have looked heavy by themselves, so it was nice to have the carnations to change up the mood. Hope you’re doing well.

      Reply
  2. Kris P

    I love the way you used the cooler colored blooms to frame the warmer ones. My zinnias and dahlias are still mostly keeping me waiting…

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Having the carnations to use was an advantage this week. They had longer stems than the dahlias so I tried to place them to extend the design from the center. Some of my zinnias are stunted, but most are finally in bloom now. Not as many as usual but happy to see them anyway. Yours will soon be there too!

      Reply
  3. tonytomeo

    Goodness! Monday!
    Those carnations seem to be lavender or even rather blue, with some in white. What color are they? When we were school, most carnations grown as cut flower crops were white, and then dyed accordingly. Of course, many stayed white. Not many exhibited natural color.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I wondered but they don’t seem to be dyed. I thought red and pink had always been available.
      Found online: “Minis are commercially grown in similar colors to their standard cousins. Hot pinks, pastel pinks, golden to butter yellows and peach colors are available. White and cream, peachy oranges from deep to pastel, and purples ranging from deep to lavender are all commercially grown and sold. Reds are grown that vary from Cabernet wine to fire-engine red. Miniature carnations are even grown in light chartreuse green.”

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        That does not sound accurate. Although most of those colors are natural, and can be grown, green is not a natural color for them. I have read about how they are naturally green, but that is merely a marketing ploy.
        There is most definitely a market for carnations with natural color though. Even though dyed colors are nearly indistinguishable from natural colors, some consumers are very discriminating.

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I left a few zinnias but picked as many dahlias as possible. Thrying to stimulate them to keep producing (or rather start producing). I rarely have store-bought flowers and it was nice to have some types I don’t grow.

      Reply
  4. Annette

    Chris is right, you always succeed in making your vases look elegant and balanced even when they feature such a huge variety. The play of the colours is also very pleasing.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh Annette, you’re too kind! Each week I feel challenged to bring some order to the flowers I’ve collected and this week it took a while to even begin arranging. But once I decided to begin I did enjoy it and just got lost in it. Thinking of you.

      Reply

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