In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

Since April 1 I have been watching with anticipation as a large pot of Asian lilies developed greenery, then buds, then buds revealing color.

April 1, 2021 Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

May 29, 2021 Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

June 2, 2021 Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Finally this past week the first flowers opened on June 7, quickly followed by many.

June 9, 2021 Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Having planned all spring to use the carmine lilies in a Monday vase when they appeared so quickly at mid-week I was unprepared to spend time arranging them. After trying out several vases without success, I opted for a cylindrical straight-sided glass container to hold the simple bouquet.

In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

Materials
Flowers
Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)
Foliage
Container
Straight-sided glass cylinder

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

28 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Red In Glass Vase

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Frank. I love the dark red. A floral designer from whom I took a few classes years ago taught to remove all the foliage, then use a different plant for foliage. I never got around to thinking about what would be a good foliage to add. I also heard a flower grower suggest to remove a lot of foliage (at least what would be below water line) before you condition the flowers. Gets more water to the flower quickly instead of hydrating the leaves you might remove later anyway.

      Reply
      1. bittster

        I never thought of all that. Interesting to get the arranger’s perspective. All my flowers are ‘arranged’ from a gardener’s perspective and the foliage just comes with each flower so I never thought to do it any other way!

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Jason. I’m starting to love lilies more. All kinds of lilies started opening at the same time last week, these Asiatic, daylilies and calla lilies.

      Reply
  1. Noelle M

    You’ve arranged those red lilies so prettily. Seeing them growing with their yellow buds I would have been so surprised to see red flowers. Many thanks for sharing. Have a good week.

    Reply
  2. Cathy

    Gosh, they are really striking! And what a lot of bulbs you have in your pots – overcrowding doesn’t seem to be an issue so perhaps I will follow your lead. Most of my lilies are Asiatic ones as I find they are generally reliable, just a shame they have no fragrance. Do you have to contend with lily beetles?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I actually divided the bulbs last year and moved some to new pots but the rabbits nibbled those! I wonder if they would do much better less crowded but for now I’m happy with the returns. I find the smell of some lilies too overpowering so this Asiatic suits me better. No problems with lily beetles, so far anyway.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    They are gorgeous and certainly need nothing more than a glass vase to show them off. I am usually put off lilies by their strong fragrance which irritates my nose and eyes and didn’t know there are some with no fragrance.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Cathy! These are known as Asiatic and have no fragrance so I like that about them. As much as I have enjoyed the fragrance of peonies and gardenias this spring, the highly scented Oriental Lilies are much too strong for me.

      Reply
  4. krispeterson100

    The lilies are sufficiently beautiful to hold their own in a vase. It is frustrating that plants care so little about our schedules in deciding when to bloom 😉 Lilies don’t do well here but, on a whim, I planted several lilies of the “tree” type last fall. I was somewhat amazed when they sprouted and I’ve been nervously eyeing them since they produced buds, waiting for their blooms. Now, with the heat turned up to high, I’m wondering if they’ll survive to bloom at all…

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. Oh, I hope your lilies do make it. I don’t always have much success with lilies which around here are supposed to be easy to grow, but this seems like an especially good year for them.

      Reply
  5. Beth@PlantPostings

    Yes, that red is really special! Seeing your lilies blooming informs me that mine won’t be far behind. They’re definitely budding and we’ve been very hot already this late spring/early summer. Your lilies are beautiful out in your garden, too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, I guess the anticipation is half the fun. They did seem to take a long time but the flowers are lasting well too. Great value.

      Reply

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