Thursday Journal

The crinum lily began opening this week. Here’s a closeup from yesterday.

Crinum × powellii (Swamp Lily)

After some overnight rain the garden seemed to be breathing a sigh of relief.  My early morning stroll around the garden yielded nice surprises.

I’ve been checking this salvia all week and today found flowers at last. The petals are a luscious blue.

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Ascending from among iris leaves and verbena bonariensis is a patch of lavender in the southern side garden, its first flowers drawing an attentive bee.

Lavender

Lavender

I knew the gardenias in the north-facing border were loaded with buds this year but discovering them today just opened in early daylight was a wonder. The fresh petals and irresistible scent are a winsome combination.  There are about 3 bushes, grown up about 7 feet high. My former next-door neighbor rooted them in little yogurt cups and shared them with me soon after we moved in. (We just passed our twenty year mark having closed on our house May 31, 2021.)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia) loaded with buds and the first flowers

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

Gardenia jasminoides (Gardenia)

I added three new salvia plants this spring. One has formed spires, the first of which revealed itself this morning.

Salvia nemorosa ‘Blue Hill’ (Meadow Sage)

I adore hydrangeas but have not had success with them. This passalong H. macrophylla  is having perhaps its best bloom year yet, despite a late cold snap.

Hydrangea macrophylla

Hydrangea macrophylla

Yesterday I spotted and chased around a tiny butterfly trying to capture its image. This morning I stumbled upon it (or maybe a cousin) in a much more cooperative mood. I was able to see this Eastern Tailed-Blue much closer up than yesterday. It was surprising to see one active early on such a cloudy day.

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas) on artemisia 

It was thundering like it meant it this afternoon as I began to write, and soon a heavy much-needed rain began to fall. Reverberating claps followed bright streaks of lightning the likes of which we hadn’t experienced in a long while. There is now a steady rain which I hope will continue for a while and return as needed to provide moderate and regular intervals the rest of the summer.

Looking ahead, I still have a few dahlias to plant out and new seed packs as well as saved seeds to do something with. I finally have a handful of zinnia seedlings the rabbits have not found. A tomato volunteered in its spot from last year and a friend passed along two Tiny Tim tomatoes he grew from seed.

The first of the shastas is open and lilies (daylilies and asiatic) look promising. Thanks for sauntering along through the garden with me today.

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Lilium ‘Black Out’ (Asiatic lily)

 

16 thoughts on “Thursday Journal

  1. automatic gardener

    Your garden is doing really well. I also grow lots of salvias and they are very reliable. You got some really great shots of the butterfly and closeups really show off its colors.

    Reply
  2. theshrubqueen

    Nice stroll through the garden, Susie. The Gardenias are luscious and better cuz they are from garden friends. The butterfly looks like Ceraunus Blues here. I could only grow Oakleaf Hydrangeas in my Atlanta garden, hope the Hydrangea Gods smile this summer! My Mystic Blue Salvias are looking promising for summer.

    Reply
  3. tonytomeo

    Gardenias are SO rad! They are not very happy in the Santa Clara Valley. Those that do well are in situations where they should not be expected to do well. It makes no sense.

    Reply
  4. Cathy

    Your gardenias are stunning, and what a lovely reminder of how your garden has grown since you moved there. More lovely shots of the butterfly too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I know I went overboard with gardenia pictures but these first ones were in such good condition. They don’t last keep long.

      Reply
  5. krispeterson100

    Seven foot tall gardenias! That’s inconceivable here. I’ve still got one sad specimen hanging on, planted soon after we moved in 10 years ago, but if it produces more than 2 or 3 flowers, I count myself lucky. Despite all your beautiful garden shots, including that of the formerly shy butterfly, I’m most envious of your thunderstorm. We don’t get those often outside our brief rainy season but stray tropical summer storms do wander through occasionally – it would be nice if that happened this summer.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It was a good storm for sure. I sent my daughter in Los Angeles a video! Before we moved here 20 years ago from another part of town we were down in a valley. The thunderstorms were fantastic.

      Reply

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