Clematis

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

The garden’s two Clematis have done well this spring. This Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ along the southern side path was the first one I ever planted. Last summer I cut it all the way back to the ground after the leaves all turned brown (per The Gardeners World’s Monte Don’s instruction for treating clematis wilt).

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Over time I have attempted more clematis but they haven’t survived the first years. Finally in 2015 I discovered this red one at my local garden center, Clematis ‘Niobe’.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Clematis ‘Niobe’

It has never bloomed all summer as advertised but in spring it usually shows such promise.

Clematis ‘Niobe’

Last month I added three more clematis around one single trellis. There’s another Clematis ‘Jackmanii’, Clematis ‘Multi Blue’, and Clematis ‘Duchess of Edinburgh’ planted April 4, 2021. So far the rabbits have not gotten them (but they are munching dalhias and phlox).

Will I regret not allowing more room?

clockwise from top: Clematis ‘Jackmanii’, Clematis ‘Multi Blue’ and Clematis ‘Duchess of Edinburgh’ (clockwise from top)

32 thoughts on “Clematis

  1. krispeterson100

    They’ve lovely, Susie. I should follow your example and persevere in seeking out more Clematis. Sweet autumn Clematis (C. terniflora) is the only one I’ve grown successfully in both my former and current gardens but friends of mine here in SoCal have grown many more.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Many gardens here have one clematis but I have only read about gardens with many. Unfortunately Sweet autumn Clematis (C. terniflora) is considered invasive here so I can’t use that one. I know people who grow it and it’s lovely.

      Reply
  2. smallsunnygarden

    Lovely clematis! I grew Niobe once-upon-a-time and loved it, but it’s the only one I have grown. It succumbed eventually to lawn mower damage (not by me!). I think your trellis planting is a wonderful idea, especially Duchess of Edinburgh, which I’ve admired in pictures.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      A shame about your Niobe, Amy. I once witnessed the pain and disappointment on my aunt’s face when she discovered her grown son had done a good deed by mowing her lawn but had inadvertently cut her fully blooming clematis loose from the ground. It was a moment of sadness for sure!

      Reply
  3. Eliza Waters

    Clematis need to have cool, shady feet with their heads in the sun, which isn’t all that easy to create (I use ferns for shade), but once they find their sweet spot, they are marvelous. I have three large ones, but it is the two with smaller blooms (C. integrifolia) that I find charming.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I need to go back and search your blog for clematis. You and Jude have packed so many wonderful plants into your beautiful garden.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Niobe is nice but quits blooming here as soon as it gets hot. We’re having an unusually cool spring (48F today) and it’s made a lot of flowers last longer. The Gardeners World shows are great.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    I also have planted several Clematis over the years but they rarely last or don’t flower for long. I think our summers are too hot for summer flowering. The Duchess of Edinburgh is a lovely one though which I now have on one of my obelisks too.

    Reply
  5. hb

    Your ‘Jackmanii’ and ‘Niobe’ are lovely. I thought I read (could be wrong) that the viticella hybrids (‘Etoile Violette’, ‘Polish Spirit’, etc) don’t or rarely get Clematis Wilt. Perhaps because the viticellas get cut to the ground every year anyway? None of my viticellas have ever gotten it. The rabbits here will bite off the emerging new growth, but the rabbits here are not fussy! 😦

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks for the info on viticella hybrids. I didn’t research before I ordered these new ones. Ordered lots of plants over the winter as “therapy.”

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    I hope they prove to be reliable for you Susie – your post demonstrates just how ‘lucky’ we are in the UK as I must have over 30 in my garden!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’ve been inspired by your clematis, Cathy, but didn’t realize you have so many. I have killed more than have survived and they’re rather expensive I think. I will look for some different types perhaps.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Such a shame they are not reliable in your part of the world. I counted and listed mine before our last opening as I would have no idea how many there were – on checking, I fid it is probably nearer 50 in total!! I have visited local (private) gardens where there can be over 100!

      2. pbmgarden Post author

        Fifty! Wow, I do admire that. Clematis may be more reliable in the garden here than I am as a gardener. I’ll keep looking for new ones to try.

      3. Cathy

        The alpina and viticella clematis tend to be very reliable here – apart from the former, almost all of mine are viticella

      4. Cathy

        I checked and at least one plant is. I probably still have some old seed though and have found lychnis seed stays viable for a few years

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.