In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

A neighbor was selling flower bouquets Saturday from her porch and I could not resist when the list included lupine and viburnum. I have unsuccessfully tried growing lupine seed this year. Then the flower grower didn’t bring lupine this week after all, but threw in buttercups. The viburnum heads were fairly weak even though I conditioned the stems overnight. The color is useful though and I immediately thought it would pair well with deep purple Iris ‘Crimson King’.

Iris ‘Crimson King’ and Viburnum

I filled out the arrangement with other irises of the moment, and other odds and ends.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Ranunculus bulbosus (Buttercup)

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris) and Iris ‘Crimson King’

Materials
Flowers
Iris ‘Crimson King’
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)
Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)
Ranunculus bulbosus (Buttercup)
Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies (Narcissus x medioluteus)
Viburnum
Foliage
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Container
Glass Pedestal Dish

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

Twin Sisters / Cemetery Ladies (Narcissus x medioluteus)

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

28 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Iris Spring

  1. Cathy

    The viburnum fills this out nicely and I love the quirky buttercups mixed in! I don’t need to add that I think your irises are gorgeous as I am sure I have said that before! 😉

    Reply
  2. Chris Mousseau

    That’s a huge Viburnum flower – I thought it was Hydrangea at first! The stand out for me is the Iris tectorum – I love the spots on the petals…it looks like it’s hardy here – I MAY have to go plant hunting!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The viburnum is a couple inches in diameter. Some of them (probably the non-native) can be huge snowballs. Iris tectorum is an easy little iris. Good luck on your hunt.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much Cathy! I remember seeing a huge and gorgeous arrangement with zinnias you had made for a TGIS or some occasion. It inspired me to take Betsy’s class when I had the chance.

      Reply
  3. krispeterson100

    Breathtaking, like a symphony to spring. I wish I had half your success with Iris. Peach and lavender/purple is one of my favorite color combinations – I’d love to have a bed comprised of a mix of peach and lavender flowers but I haven’t managed that (yet).

    Reply
  4. Cathy

    My, that is a sumptuous arrangement – you do these pedestal vases so well, Susie! The viburnum makes a great addition – do the blooms stay this shade? You have certainly been able to show off your Crimson Kings to their best advantage. Thanks for sharing

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The grower didn’t specify the name of the viburnum. I saw a snowball viburnum while driving today and it definitely had those huge, white balls of flowers.

      Reply
  5. tonytomeo

    The iris are rad! I rarely cut them, since they do not last long. I think they would last better in a humid climate, or during our rare humid weather. The humidity is not so minimal near the coast as it is in the Santa Clara Valley.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It’s true, the irises don’t last well at all as cut flowers. They’ve done well in the garden this year–the humidity here is 68% right now.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        When I was a kid, I picked the San Francisco iris, Iris douglasiana, that live on the coast of San Mateo County. They wilted by the time I got them home. Of course, that did not stop me from picking more if they were still in bloom when I went out again later.

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