In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

I noticed some of the cerinthe is beginning to set seed. It’s the first time I’ve really seen it bloom so I’m not sure if cutting it will help it keep growing, but it seemed like a good choice to feature in this week’s vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Small stems of redbud and spirea were used as color accents.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

A Fenton handpainted glass vase echoes the colors displayed in the cerinthe and makes the redbud pop.

In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

Materials
Flowers
Cercis canadensis (Eastern Redbud)
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Foliage
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Container
Hand painted Fenton Glass Vase – USA

As always thanks to our host Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for providing this opportunity to to share our vases. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

32 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Cerinthe With Pink

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I admired cerinthe for years in other gardeners’ vases and finally found seeds at Renee’s last year and planted them a bit late. The green, blue, purple richness didn’t come through last year but I’m happy with how they’ve grown this year.

      Reply
  1. lammjane

    Thank you! Always a wonderful way to start the week. Love the hand painted vase. Seeing the dyed Easter eggs brought back great memories from the past. Jane

    >

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      One of my sisters bought the vase for me. It works well with these frilly spring flowers. Glad you enjoyed memories of dying eggs, Jane. It didn’t take us long to color them but we enjoyed it so much.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    That vase is perfect for these blooms, Susie, and a fluted neck is such an asset for a vase. The blooms themselves are perfect in combination and the cerinthe foliage is such a good foil. Thanks for sharing and best wishes to you both

    Reply
  3. krispeterson100

    The vase and its contents are nicely paired, Susie. I’ve grown Cerinthe on occasion but never noticed that cutting the stems spurred additional flowers. The plants self-seed here, albeit lightly.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. Annette said hers self-seed too but I’m also collecting some seeds. It would be nice if it were a cut and come again type plant. It’s magical. I really like it.

      Reply
  4. theshrubqueen

    The vase reflects its contents perfectly. Don’t know about you – I had not heard of Cerinthe until the past couple of years, though it is well known in the UK..The American Gardener had an article about it and that was my first sight.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Eliza. The vase was a gift from one of my sweet sisters. I’ll have to ask her where and when she got it but it was not vintage.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy. The vase became the focal point for this arrangement I think. It’s nice when one works out to be a good fit for the flowers on hand.

      Reply
  5. tonytomeo

    Both spirea and redbud are rad. I met that species of spirea for the first time this year. (I actually met it years ago, but not in bloom.) ‘Forest Pansy’ redbud is the most popular Eastern redbud here now. I really dislike it, not only because of the foliar color, but because it is too popular. The green sorts are rare!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I like ‘Forest Pansy’ redbud but agree it is planted everywhere now. This one is just an ordinary native passalong that actually is on its last leg.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        Oh, the natives are rad! I mean, they are rad in my garden because I prefer the species as it appears in the wild. I grew one from seed from Oklahoma, although some describe it as another variety of the species. However, I can see why cultivars are preferred for landscapes. I would like ‘Forest Pansy’ more if it had not become such a fad, although I still prefer the green sort.

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