In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

I gathered the first Thalia Daffodils this morning thinking they would feature in today’s vase. Stems of spirea, camellias, snowflakes and bits of foliage of different sorts, including fresh rosettes of unfurling columbine–all collected up as well.

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

But hellebores being conditioned in a drinking glass engaged my attention and inspired me to use them on their own without adornment.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

For a container today I had already decided to use my grandmother’s burgundy teapot so I shifted the hellebores into it.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

Three sprigs of Cerinthe seemed to add a nice final touch.

Helleborus x hybridus

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

Helleborus x hybridus

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

Materials
Flowers
Helleborus hybridus
‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe
Foliage
Container
Grandma’s Teapot. McCormick Tea, Baltimore Md., Made In USA (some history of this teapot)

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to try arranging flowers to share. Visit her to discover what garden surprises she and others are offering this week.

33 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Spring Tea

  1. Noelle M

    Yes, you were right: the Hellebores look just right in your teapot. When we use or see these lovely artefacts passed through the family, it makes us stop and reminisce.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Noelle, I think you’re right. It’s so nice to have a few reminders like this of important people and times in our lives. I love passalong plants for the same reason.

      Reply
  2. Kristine Peterson

    That’s a beautiful way to share your spectacular and varied hellebore collection, Susie. I laughed when I saw the teapot as my Hippeastrum arrangement started out in a teapot as well but I moved it when I couldn’t manage to make its peculiarly short fat stem behave.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Jeanne and thanks for doing all the research on that teapot. My mother had a yellow one but I always loved the other color better.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    Oh what a bountiful collection of hellebores that sit beautifully in your co-ordinated teapot. I must try out some different conditioning techniques for hellebores again. No doubt you have pooped your other blooms in another vase? Isn’t aquilegia foliage gorgeous? Thanks for sharing

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. Yes a vase of camellias sit on the kitchen table and several other glasses of flowers need to be plopped into vases. It’s so nice outside I need to be weeding. I don’t stress over conditioning the hellebores–just enjoy as long as they last. I’ve tried different techniques but can’t tell one way works over another.

      Reply
  4. theshrubqueen

    The teapot is the perfect color to set off the Hellebores..beautifully done. Oddly, I have a similar teapot that was a wedding gift to my parents in 1950, also marked Halls… will send a picture. I have used it as a vase at some point.. think our mothers are smiling?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Originally I’d planned to use all white Thalias in that teapot. The hellebores probably were a better choice since the coloration echoed the teapot color. Do you ever use your teapot for tea? It may have lead in the glaze for all I know so I think we’re better off using them as vases. My mother had a yellow teapot like my grandmother’s burgundy one, but don’t recall her ever using it.

      Reply
  5. Eliza Waters

    This is so pretty and feminine, Susie, with the teapot evoking scenes of afternoon teatime out in the garden. I love that it is a pot that belonged to your grandmother and the highlights of the Hellebores match it perfectly.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I can picture that tea party in the garden Eliza. What fun it would be. I was very close to my grandmother so it is nice to have this keepsake. Have a great week.

      Reply
  6. Annette

    Lovely to see the Cerinthe in with the hellebores, they look so good together and the colour of the tea pot is just perfect. Thalia is certainly one of the best varieties. Unlike a lot of others it flowers faithfully each year and spreads nicely. Happy spring days, Susie

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Had to sneak in some Cerinthe, Annette! Yes, I love Thalia too, although mine may need dividing. There aren’t as many this year. Happy Spring Annette.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        To me, they seem to always do well in other regions. If mine were so reliable, I would not dislike them so. This season has been encouraging. Because others like them so much, I really want them to look good. I can still dislike them.

  7. Cathy

    Your hellebores are glorious! I always shy from just cutting them for a vase as they rarely last very long, but maybe I should just go for it! 😃

    Reply

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