Approaching Mid-March 2021

More hellebores are in flower. These, planted along the north side of the house in 2016, came from Pine Knot Farms (PKF) in southern Virginia. They have not bulked up much in all these years but I am happy to see them again.

Helleborus ’Black Diamond’ (Winter Jewels® Black Diamond)

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Apricot Blush’ (seedlings)

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Apricot Blush’ (seedlings)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Also in the northern side garden this camellia is looking fine today. Just a few days ago its buds barely revealed color so I was surprised it opened so suddenly.  Last year it bloomed 10 days earlier.

Camellia ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia ‘Coral Delight’

The weather has been delightful all week, spirit-lifting really. On several days I managed to spend a few hours weeding and performing general clean-up. It is taking longer than expected but far from being a chore this year I am finding the tasks to be immensely satisfying.

Unknown Narcissus (Daffodil)

I showed these cerinthe flowers recently but am compelled by their rich colors to share them again.  I planted seeds last May in two locations. There is no sign of them in the back garden location, but this spot beside the house and next to the driveway is where they found happiness.

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

‘Pride of Gibraltar’ Hummingbird Cerinthe

37 thoughts on “Approaching Mid-March 2021

  1. theshrubqueen

    Susie, I was getting bored with the Hellebores til I saw yours. Gorgeous. Especially the black one. I feel the same spirit lifting in my garden..planting mad borders.

    Reply
  2. lammjane

    Thanks for posting. I love the Pride of Gibraltar and have never seen it. Love all your photos. Always make me happy especially on Monday. XO Jane

    >

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Jane! I’ve seen cerinthe on garden blogs for years but had never seen it growing in person and could hardly believe the coloration.

      Reply
  3. Kristine Peterson

    Every single photo is a joy to view, Susie, but I was entirely captivated by the hellebores – what a range of colors you have! I’m glad the weather has allowed you to get out an d putter in the garden.

    Reply
  4. Pauline

    Your hellebores are beautiful, such a nice selection and I love your daffodil with its twisty petals, how unusual! The Cerinthe has such a gorgeous colour, who could resist it!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I added this group of hellebores after being smitten with your distinctive ones, Pauline. I lost track of the name of that daffodil. The leaves grow above the height of the flowers.

      Reply
  5. gardeninacity

    How do you photograph the Hellebores? We have a bunch on the verge of blooming but they are almost always facing down. In a few days I may cut some and place them in a bowl of water. Love the Cerinthe. Can’t wait for our Daffodils to bloom but it will be a while.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I did have to take one-handed photos while I propped up the flowers! Floating them is a good way to display them. Keep checking those Daffodils. Here they seem rather late. Mine are open in some spots but not others where they normally open at once.

      Reply
  6. rusty duck

    I am a sucker for anything black and adore that hellebore. I have a similar one that has only just started to bloom. It too shows no sign of filling out, that it is back again this year is enough! Perhaps some varieties are just like that.

    Reply
  7. Annette

    Just beautiful! I somehow feel that black helleborus are less vigorous. At least in my garden they can’t keep up with Picotee & Co. . What I love most about them is they’re ability to surprise us 🙂

    Reply
  8. tonytomeo

    Cerinthe is interesting. I saw pictures of it last year, but still have not seen it directly. I sort of wonder if it is unpopular here because it does not perform so well.

    Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        They seem to be popular in the East and New England, although I do not know. I noticed them in old pictures from about 1970. (My Pa enjoyed photography, and got many pictures of historic Williamsburg while in Virginia back then.) They seem to be popular there now too. I have seen them only on a few occasions here, and was not impressed with the dark purple color. I only recently saw the rich blue color. Renee’s Garden is my neighbor, and happens to sell ‘Pride of Gibraltar’ seed.

  9. Cathy

    Hiw lovely for you to get a nice spell of weather to enjoy your spring flowers. Our spring is on hold here and it is cold again! The Cerinthe are grogeous, and so early. I believe the bees like it.

    Reply
  10. Beth@PlantPostings

    They are all so beautiful! You can’t go wrong with Hellebores and Camellias. I have several of the former, and I wish I could grow the latter. Camellias break my heart with their beauty, but my climate is too cold. Thanks for sharing the beauty!

    Reply

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