In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of materials gathered from our gardens.

The white double hippeastrum (amaryllis) and the purple orchid may look familiar. The orchid appeared in Christmastide December 21, 2020; the hippeastrum in Blue Vase January 11, 2021; and jointly they formed the basis of Odds And Ends January 18, 2021. Redundant as they may be I am grateful to have these fabulous flowers in bloom for such a long period during an otherwise drab time of the year.  

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

I was amused last week by how many of you commented you own, but mostly don’t (or even never) use a mortar, and you were surprised to see one used as a floral container.  Each week as I search around for something to hold Monday flowers, pretty much any vessel is fair game to use as a vase. I didn’t plan today to try to use something unexpected as a container, but coincidentally my mother’s cookie jar, which normally sits on the same counter where the hippeastrum has been growing, is the inspiration for today’s design. These past weeks I kept wondering if I could transfer the plant into the cookie jar without breaking the stalks to give it a stronger foundation and yes, it was simple.  The bulb was originally planted in a 6 by 6.5 inch ornamental pail. Luckily the pail had a removable plastic insert so I was able to lift the insert and move the contents without disrupting roots, stems or flowers. The cookie jar is two inches taller than the original container and much heavier.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Neither the cookie jar’s turquoise color nor its shape worked quite as well as I had envisioned. But all in all the 2.5-foot towering arrangement carries an awesome sense of floral drama for this time of year, even if the height made it difficult to photograph. This image was taken looking down at it from the staircase in the foyer and so has foreshortening.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Placed upon the buffet the vase fills the dining room.

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Materials
Flowers
Hippeastrum (amaryllis)
Orchid
Foliage
Lavender
Orchid
Container
Turquoise Cookie Jar, 8-inches high, 6 inches at mouth

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

27 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Blue Jar Tower

  1. Cathy

    Gosh, it doesn’t look 2.5 ft but as you say the angle of the photo must be misleading – that’s certainly a sizeable arrangement and not something that could be accommodated in this house, which I suppose is why I avoid large arrangements cause there is just nowhere with a suitably uncluttered background! It’s good to be able to-purpose previous vases and it’s clever how you have managed to stuff the orchid container into the jar – it works really well. Thanks for sharing Susie, as always ps do you hear from Christina at all these days?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I thought showing the vase in the dining room would help suggest the scale. It feels huge. Moved it back into the foyer. I agree finding suitable backgrounds can be a problem for something so tall. The orchid is really two small orchids with individual liners, so they’re just tucked in gently. Thanks for hosting, Cathy. We exchange occasional emails, last time in September. At that time doing well, trying to stay safe at home like us all. I miss her and her garden.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Thanks for update on Christina – I haven’t emailed for a while but must do so soon. It alway bothered me that her contributions seemed to stop quite suddenly 🙄 but of course there us no obligation to blog…

  2. Noelle M

    I was speaking with my daughter in law yesterday and having bought my grand-daughter an amarylis each year since she was born: 10 years,, I thought it would be a bit cliché. They missed it and I am told they have a lovely white double coming out, which they had to go out and buy! Having seen yours, I now have an idea of how beautiful it looks.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I recommend you run out and buy another one for them (although late, you can say you’ve kept up your amaryllis streak). This one came as a gift and it’s been exceptional.

      Reply
  3. Kristine Peterson

    I’m always looking for vase alternatives too and your comments immediately had me thinking about the cookie jars I have, one a pig and the other a cat, but I quickly concluded that, headless, they wouldn’t work ;( My phalaenopsis also have an extended bloom lives but I can’t recall that any of my Hippeastrum have looked good for as long as your white one has. The first of my Hippeastrum to develop a bloom stalk now has a single open flower and is developing a second stalk. I’m trying to be patient.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Ha! Ha! Yes the headless image doesn’t work.😀 I find lidded jars or teapots never look quite as nice without their tops, the proportions that make them attractive in the first place are altered. Enjoy your Hippeastrum.

      Reply
  4. Frogend_dweller

    Good thinking with the cookie jar and what a lovely cookie jar it is!! I’ve learnt from experience that a very heavy or tall container is a must for Hippeastrums. The addition of the lavender foliage works nicely to combine the elements I think.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy. Glad you like the new header. I’ve been looking back through photos of the meditation circle and came across those irises. I’m not sure what has happened to them but I don’t think there are nearly so many now.

      Reply
  5. Cathy

    Lovely! As I scrolled down the page the orchids became visible and I scrolled down a bit more and saw the lovely jar and the little sprigs of lavender! The jar is a great shape… I often find vases have much too large necks as I rarely use foam or a frog.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, you’re right, there do seem to be three distinct sections! It’s a challenge sometimes to find a vase with just the right size opening. My garden club meeting yesterday (online) featured a local florist who gave a wonderful demonstration of creating winter flower vases. She used foam but recommended using branches or scrunched chicken wire to create a structure.

      Reply

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