In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

A friend who grows roses has shared several vases with me this autumn. She stopped by again Saturday with more lovely, fragrant flowers. A few days earlier our next-door neighbor had dropped off a mixed bouquet from her grocery store outing that contained 3 roses. The only rose I grow is a passalong that blooms only in spring, so I took advantage of this rare opportunity to work with roses for this week’s vase.

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

Aiming for a traditional round design I began by gathering dark foliage of camellia and gardenia to contrast with the roses. Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’ has been flowering for several weeks and now is in full bloom.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

The Hana-Jiman camellia has white crinkled petals edged in pink with deep yellow centers. These had been battered by Sunday morning rain and several lost their petals before I could finish the arrangement. For those that lasted their coloring complemented the yellow and pink roses.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’

A couple of early C. sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ have opened as well. As I turn the vase around, one is visible in the second view along with a sunflower from my next-door neighbor’s mixed bouquet.

View 2 (Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ and Sunflower)

View 3 reveals my favorite of my friend’s locally grown roses. Its large wide open form makes a nice feature flower for the design. The darker pink rose below it is one of the store-bought roses–sturdy and attractive but without scent.

View 3

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

This vase is meant to be viewed from all sides. This is View 4. The bottom pink rose on the right-hand side is the most fragrant flower in the bouquet. I do not know the names of any of the roses.

View 4

My late season zinnias are tiny, but make a cheerful addition to the arrangement.

Zinnia

Zinnia

Materials
Flowers
Alstroemeria (gifts, not from my garden)
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
Carnation (gifts, not from my garden)
Lavender
Roses (gifts, not from my garden)
Sunflower
Zinnia
Foliage
Camellia sasanqua ‘Hana-Jiman’
Gardenia jasminoides
Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’
Marigold
Container
Ceramic Urn Stamped “Vintage 4”
6-inch clear Lomey dish
eco-friendly Oasis floral foam

In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

After enjoying working with arranging dahlias all summer and fall they have suddenly stopped flowering. The gifts of roses came at an opportune time.  As my husband continues to recuperate from a serious health issue (non-covid), our family, friends and neighbors have lent much support with flowers, meals, emails, calls, cards, errands and even lysol spray. We are nourished by their care and good wishes. We are so grateful he is back home and getting stronger.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

26 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Vintage Bouquet

  1. Noelle M

    I love the camelia. You’ve brought the colours together in a poised arrangement, and married both roses and dainties from your garden very well.

    Reply
  2. Eliza Waters

    Beautifully designed arrangement, Susie, and so cheering in those bright golds and pinks. Sending healing thoughts for your husband’s continuing journey to recovery. ❤

    Reply
  3. Cathy

    That definitely does have a vintage look to it, Susie, and I like the way your zinnias complement the roses and the centres of the camellias. It’s good to know that family and friends have watched out for you during your tough times, so you could focus on the things that matter. Sadly the C Yuletide I bought gave up after a couple of years – I had it in a pot and probably didn’t water it enough

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. Finally the zinnias had a chance to be part of a Monday vase! Too bad about your Yuletide. I’ve lost most of the camellias I’ve ever tried, probably for the same reason.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Was it really the first time for your zinnias this year? My amaranthus had not been picked this season until today’s vase 😉

      2. pbmgarden Post author

        Second I think. The rabbits ate my beautiful crop of zinnias early this summer and it took a while to find replacement seeds and get them to flower. Every year I intend to plant amaranthus but here we are again and I didn’t do it.

      3. Cathy

        Oh that’s a shame – you probably mentioned it before but I had clearly forgotten. 🙄 Amaranthus is really easy to grow but next year I am going to look for a more erect variety rather than the dangly ones whch can be difficult to use in vase

  4. Cathy

    Best wishes for a quick recovery for your husband Susie. You have lovely friends and neighbours, bringing you such pretty roses! A wonderful display. 😃

    Reply
  5. theshrubqueen

    Yum, I love it. How often do you get roses and Yuletides? Wonderful gifts from friends, and I am glad to hear your husband is on the mend. You seem to be enjoying being back in the garden, yay!

    Reply
  6. tonytomeo

    How delightful! When we grew camellias, we grew al of those cultivars of Camellia sasanqua. I preferred the more common Camellia japonica, but I miss all of them. (Of course, Camellia japonica are not such good as cut flowers. They mostly got floated in bowls.)

    Reply

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