In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Virgie was my mother’s first cousin and she shared her love of gardening and lots of plants with me over the years. Her passalong rose is blooming this week and it seemed destined to feature in today’s vase.

When I began photographing the arrangement the heuchera leaf front and center at the lip of the vase seemed much too dark; I added a white snapdragon so it would not leave a black hole.  Later I decided I liked the balance of the other flowers without that central snapdragon.  Now I cannot decide so thought I would show both ways. The top two images show the original design and these next two show the modified one with the additional snapdragon.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Accompanying the roses is a branch of Flowering Dogwood. Dogwood is native to North Carolina and serves as our state flower.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Other white flowers include a late blooming narcissus, whose name I wish I knew, and the aforementioned snapdragon, Speedy Sonnet White.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

A few pink and red dianthus were added for accent and texture.

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

As concealer foliage I used young leaves of Big Top Bronze Heuchera with their reddish undersides, along with spring green fern-like tansy leaves (one is visible in the upper right corner).

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Materials
Flowers
Antirrhinum majus ‘Speedy Sonnet White’ (Snapdragon)
Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)
Dianthus Ideal Select Mix
Narcissus
Rose
Foliage
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Vase
Ceramic Urn Stamped “Vintage 4”

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week. Good health and peace to you.

35 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Rose and White

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Cindy. When I was growing up it seems to me my mother’s rose like this bloomed at Mother’s Day, but mine usually blooms about now. Hope you’re doing well.

      Reply
  1. Noelle

    This is a fabulous rose to have inherited. AS usual with plants because we can propagate, we can ensure all our family can share in equally in these treasures.

    Reply
  2. Chris Mousseau

    All these flowers are so beautiful! I think I like the original arrangement, without the additional snapdragon. Perhaps because without it, you have three white things, but with it, you have four, and because the dogwood is higher, it looks like the fourth, and appears as an afterthought, and a bit out of place. I really like the asymmetricalness of it all!

    Reply
  3. Cathy

    How wonderful to have roses in bloom (well, at least one rose!) in April – I have found the odd bud on some of mine but it will still be many weeks before they get to flowering stage. It certainly suggests a vase from later in the year and has such a summery blush about it. Personally, I like it with the antirrhinum, with the whites sprinkled through the arrangement. Thanks for sharing Susie

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      This is my only Rose in the garden so will look forward to yours later. The extra white snapdragon does help it flow. I keep going back and forth. In person the arrangement looks fine without it, but the camera saw it differently.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        It’s intriguing that the camera sees it differently, although I suppose the result is from that specific angle and in pperson the angle may always be slightly different and from different distances. I had forgotten that you don’t really have roses – is it a climate thing? What will the flowering season be of this one?

      2. pbmgarden Post author

        This rose blooms for several weeks and that’s it for a year. It’s very humid here in summertime and roses tend to get black spot, Japanese beetles, and need feeding and other attention, which I’m unlikely to give them regularly. I love a beautiful bowl of roses but don’t care much about tending them in the garden. Maybe one day I’ll give them a try again or find another easy one.

      3. Cathy

        Presumably any local gardens with roses would only have varieties that can cope…otherwise it would be trial and error, I suppose

  4. Kris Peterson

    That’s a lovely rose, Susie. The scattered touches of white make it sparkle. I didn’t note the lack of anything with your first version but, upon seeing it with the addition snapdragon stem, I admit I like that version better still.

    Reply
  5. Cathy

    Gorgeous vase and, as with all your vases, that beautiful overall shape is remarkable, created with the spray of dogwood. dIs that little spikey bit of foliage (bud?) in your eighth picture (rose close-up) dianthus? Nice to have plants in the garden that remind us of people dear to us.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Cathy, many thank and yes, you’re correct. That is dianthus and the little buds have opened up now in the vase. Hope you’re doing well.

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    What a beautiful arrangement Susie. So professional and well- balanced. Your garden must be a dream right now with those gorgeous blooms! I had to compare the two versions hard as they are both perfect, but I think I rather like that dark spot in the original version. 😃

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I’m leaning toward the first version too. It’s a beautiful day here and I should be in the garden but I’ve been lazy today.

      Reply

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