Late February Garden With Snow

February Snow Feb 20, 2020 5:18pm

February’s weather is reliably unpredictable and often messy. This past week is typical. There were a few bright sunny mornings but the sun was inconstant. What might have seemed reasonably warm temperatures were made bone-chilling by shifts to dull gray skies that released a see-saw of downpours and drizzle, culminating in a sloppy, wet snow yesterday (Thursday). The snow began falling mid-afternoon and I ventured outside just before dark.

Spirea branches, already in bloom, were covered in icy snow and dipping downward. Tucked deep underneath the shrub, groups of hellebores found some protection.

Hellebores beneath Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Narcissus have been blooming several weeks.

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

The advanced growth of foliage on this patch of iris surprised me.

February Snow -Iris

Despite the curious common name of summer snowflakes, Leucojum aestivum began blooming this week in time for the snow. It is normal for these to appear this time of year. These came from my sisters’ garden about 5 years ago.

February Snow -Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

Snowfall ended by midnight. The sun shone brightly this morning revealing icy snow high in tree tops and a rich blue sky.

Around 8:30 a.m. a cold breeze stirred the chimes in the meditation circle, making the garden sing against the otherwise quiet hour. Birds were sheltered inside the large drooping spirea whose weighted branches touched the earth, forming a protective avian hideaway. They perched also in nearby trees, all waiting for me to finish taking pictures so they could resume visits to the freshly stocked feeder.

Meditation Circle Feb 21, 2020 8:30am

Much of the snow had disappeared by late afternoon and it is expected to be 61°F. Sunday.

A few days earlier, at eventide on Tuesday, I had braved the rain-saturated ground to walk the garden. Here are a few images from before the snow. This Iberis is such a delight.

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake)

 

36 thoughts on “Late February Garden With Snow

  1. Pauline

    Flowers are amazingly resilient aren’t they, they can cope with all that the weather throws at them. Snow makes the garden look so different for a short time, we haven’t had any here yet, but there is plenty of time!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Guess I wasn’t in the mood for snow but at least we didn’t get snowed in yesterday. I was able to teach my yoga class and we kept power throughout.

      Reply
      1. pbmgarden Post author

        Yoga has helped me through some challenging times. hadn’t planned to teach when I went through training—just wanted to learn more, but once I got into it I discovered I enjoyed teaching. I teach a gentle, meditative style, including a mindfulness meditation practice after savasana. 🧘‍♀️

      2. digwithdorris

        Sounds blissful. I have been practicing since my first classes when I was 17. I swear by it. My mum may not do a class anymore but still will take herself off for a stretch and she’s an octogenarian.

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The deer were in my yard feeding from the bird feeder until we installed the fence. Deer could easily jump it but it’s as tall as our POA allows and it has effectively deterred the deer.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      This snow was mostly a blip in our advance toward spring, although it’s still hanging around because it has been cold overnight. Should clear soon.

      Reply
  2. bittster

    A nice little treat to see everything in snow, especially when most of it melts by the next day and doesn’t cause too many inconveniences. Sounds like you made the best of it!

    Reply
  3. Kris Peterson

    That’s a true weather whiplash! I hope the snow didn’t cause any permanent damage to your beautiful bulb blooms. We were hopeful of rain last night into this afternoon but it looks as though we’re going to get zilch; however, my friend about 50 miles north just let me know she’s getting hit with hail.

    Reply
  4. theshrubqueen

    I think I have the Southern attitude towards snow – yuck and run to the grocery for bread and milk – but, there is nothing like the hush over the landscape provided by a blanket of snow. And your bulb photos are fabulous!

    Reply
  5. tonytomeo

    Goodness! I forget that it is still winter. We have been without rain for a month, and none is forecast. February may be completely dry right to the end.
    Snowflake is cool. I grow it instead of snowdrop. (I do not understand the allure of snowdrop.)

    Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        Reservoirs have enough water stored. We technically do not nee any more rain. I just miss it. It only happens for a few short months, so we enjoy it while we can. There happened to be a brief but heavy rainstorm in the Los Angeles region yesterday. Those are rad.

  6. Cathy

    Brrr. Hope it has disappeared by now Susie. It looks really icy. Our February has been ‘mild’, that is above freezing point most of the month, so the garden is slowly waking up here too. The narcissi look so pretty with a dusting of snow. 😃

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I agree. Many of the daffodils have not really recovered from the snow and are just flattened. I have brought inside quite a few though they last much better outside under better circumstances.

      Reply

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