In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden encourages us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

Large-trumpet golden King Alfred daffodils ushered in early spring this past week just in time to be smacked down by rain and wind.  I gathered a generous bunch to share in a vase this week.  Many of these were resting on the earth so it made sense to salvage as many as possible and restore a modicum of dignity to these regal flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

Materials
Flowers
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’
Foliage
Container
Straight-sided glass vase

In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

After a stormy week in many parts of the world, I hope everyone is safe. Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the globe. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In a vase this week.

38 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Golden Cheer

  1. Cathy

    They look glorious grouped in quantity like this, Susie – thanks for sharing them. Here, the first bud on my dwarf narcissi is just about ready to open

    Reply
  2. Chloris

    Lovely to see a big bright bunch of daffs. We have early ones in bloom, or at least we did, they all have their noses in the soil now too after such savage winds.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We both chose bright cheery yellows after freakish storms. Hope things dry out for you. We have rain again this morning. I know we’ll need it much more in July.

      Reply
  3. Kris Peterson

    I’m glad you were able to salvage so many of those bright beautiful blooms, Susie. I’m surprised to see that you already have large-cupped daffodils in bloom. Mine, none of which must be early flowering varieties, are only just peaking above soil level.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We started seeing daffodil foliage emerging before Christmas I think. Although I’m eager for spring, it feels like plants want to rush way too quickly.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      So pleased to be able to share these daffodils today Eliza. We’re back to heavy rain this morning so I’m glad I gathered as many stems as possible.

      Reply
  4. Beth @ PlantPostings

    Thank you for sharing your spring beauties with us. We are stuck in winter for a few more weeks here in the Northern Midwest. I’ve had the wind/storms thing happen to my spring-flowering bulbs before, too. Your solution is perfect.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad to bring you a bit of sunshine. I so wish I could visit your N. Midwest area in June but it’s just not possible this year. The Fling sounds fabulous. Only have made it to the D.C. one.

      Reply
  5. tonytomeo

    Wow, that is quite a few of the classic ‘King Alfred’. I thought it was a group of a smaller type until saw what you wrote about them. I would feel badly about taking that many out of the garden. I used to do it when I was a kid though, because there was an abandoned field of daffodil in the neighborhood. They were grown for cut flower decades earlier.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’ve read many bulbs labeled ‘King Alfred’ are not really and I have no way to verify. The crowns do not seem as large as “usual” this year. They’ve been planted 18 years.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        I have read the same, and also found that ‘King Alfred’ is sometimes unavailable. What is available instead is supposed to be better, but there is no improvement of perfection.

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