In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden encourages us to share a vase highlighting what is growing in our gardens.

With still not a drop of rain for weeks zinnias and dahlias are no longer producing enough blooms for generous, overflowing arrangements.

Switching gears today, I concentrated on using leaves of a tulip poplar that volunteered in the yard this summer. Quoting from Wikipedia, “The tulip tree is one of the largest of the native trees of the eastern United States, known to reach the height of 191.9 feet (58.49 meters)[4] with a trunk 1–2 m (4–6 ft) in diameter.” In other words this tree had no business sprouting up under my deck.

In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

Actually I am very fond of tulip poplars, remembering long summer days under one at my childhood home. That was a beautiful tree that eventually succumbed to Hurricane Fran in 1996. Another tulip poplar imprinted in my memory grew in woods behind our Wave Road house where we raised our daughter.  Unpacking our car one year after returning from vacation we saw the tree had been struck by lightning, scorched from top to toe.

The leaf form is simple and strong, as broad as tall, stretching 5-6 inches. I envisioned and tried a variety of ways to use the collected leaves but found all more challenging than there was time to come to clear resolution. I settled on one leaf, one dahlia.

The container is blown glass, asymmetrical with alternating bands of blue and green color. its top is loosely pinched together leaving just a small narrow opening.

In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

Today’s vase has me thinking of shape, pattern, positive and negative space and a touch of nostalgia.

In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Labyrinth’ (?) (sold as Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’)
Foliage
Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip Poplar)
Container
Glass vase

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

16 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Pattern And Shape

  1. Kris P

    Your arrangements always look like art to me, Susie. I love how you used bands of sunlight peering through blinds (?) in the first 2 photos to mimic the pattern of the vase. Your mystery dahlia doesn’t look as yellow as my ‘Labyrinth’ but then mine isn’t as pink as those I see in photos either. Maybe we both have mutant varieties?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. I do sort of treat these vases as an art project—frustrated artist 👩‍🎨 . Yes, I’m not convinced mine is ‘Labyrinth’ either.

      Reply
  2. theshrubqueen

    I also have fond memories of Tulip Poplars and love to see them when I travel north. The not Cafe au Lait looks great with the graphic leaf and vase. And almost looks like a Cafe au Lait! Nice composition.

    Reply
  3. tonytomeo

    I’m sorry I missed it last week. Tulip tree, as they are known here, are grand relative to most other deciduous trees. They used to be a popular street tree in San Jose, but were severely damaged by scale years ago, and many were removed. They do not need much chill, and are actually happy in Los Angeles (unless they get the scale).

    Reply

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