Bulbs – “Oh, My!”

Just placed a bulb order with Longfield Gardens, on a whim. We have had so much rain lately it will be easy to see where not to plant them. The meditation circle was flooded for a day. And the ground is soggy.

Sunshine today makes all things seem possible, even the likelihood of getting these bulbs in the ground.

26 thoughts on “Bulbs – “Oh, My!”

  1. Cathy

    Lovely choices. Anemones always do well for you. I haven’t seen that creamy white one before though. We have an icy wind today, and snow is forecast for Monday, so I am glad I have got all my bulbs in. 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Ice and snow? Wow, and wasn’t it just recently still fairly mild? I should have planned for bulbs earlier but here there is still time before the ground freezes. If only the spring blooms look like the pictures!

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    What a lovely selection, your garden will be so pretty in the spring! I still have some of mine to plant, hopefully will get them planted this coming week in spite of the cold weather that is forecast.

    Reply
  3. Kris P

    I look forward to seeing your new bulbs in bloom. Greedy as I am, I wish I could grow all the bulbs those of you in colder climates can. After all these years, I still suffer from a severe case of tulip envy.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Your double Negrita sounds lovely. Your tulips are always so beautiful. I don’t have much luck with them and haven’t tried to grow them in years but maybe this will be a breakthrough year!

      Reply
  4. tonytomeo

    Grape hyacinth! That is so rad! That is such a classic. It is nice that it is still available. I have seen many of the modern cultivars, but am not as impressed as I am with the traditional plain and simple.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Love grape hyacinths and always have a few. Mine don’t naturalize well but probably because I’m digging them up when trying to plant other things.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        In my former garden, digging them up was how some of the spread. I sometimes needed to dig up a clump to move it, only to leave a few behind. They would develop into another clump that would also get dug and moved . . . . starting the process over again.

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