In A Vase On Monday – Aloe And Iris

In A Vase On Monday – Aloe And Iris

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement composed of materials collected from our gardens.

Aloe from last week’s vase made an easily accessible starting point for today. The focal point is a reblooming yellow iris from a foundation bed in front of the house. The timing of this iris is interesting—one in the back garden had already bloomed a full month earlier.

Reblooming Iris – a passalong

This one opened Friday, the day after Hurricane Michael passed through town. We were extremely fortunate, not even losing power, though many neighborhoods nearby were without for days due to fallen trees crashing on power lines.  On a day following a hurricane the sky is always clear blue, incredulously intense, pristinely innocent.

Leaves from Gold Dust Aucuba and cuttings from some ubiquitous-in-autumn, yellow potted chrysanthemums serve as filler.

Reblooming Iris and Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)

Materials
Flowers
Chrysanthemum
Iris
Foliage
Aloe
Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)
Vase

Ceramic bowl, black matte exterior, red glazed interior
Weighted florist’s pin, black

In A Vase On Monday – Aloe And Iris

This black and white study of the chrysanthemum buds illustrates how yellow serves as white in balancing light and darks in a floral design.

In A Vase On Monday – Aloe And Iris

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

28 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Aloe And Iris

  1. Noelle

    Yellow is one of my favourite colours in the garden, as is white, which is not considered a colour…..There is as always such poise and elegance in your arrangements.

    Reply
  2. Peter Herpst

    Beautiful arrangement as always. So glad that you are safe and sound after Matthew’s visit and hope your garden didn’t suffer too much damage.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Peter. Just had a tipped flower pot in the garden after Hurricane Michael passed through. (I had the name wrong in my post originally. Matthew is imprinted on my memory from 2016.)

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    ‘Pristinely innocent’ – that implies such a lot, Susie, and makes one think. Glad you personally escaped disruption. The tiny chrysanthemum buds are perfect to accompany the iris and the greens are just the right shade, but your black and white photo makes us think beyond our first impressions, so thank you for that

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy–the hurricane brought down many trees in my town and many friends are just getting their power back on. We were grateful to be so lucky ourselves. B&W filters are fun to experiment with on flower arrangements.

      Reply
  4. tonytomeo

    Do you happen to know what specie of Aloe that is? Most aloe here are known as Aloe vera, just because that is how they are labeled in the nursery. Any aloe that is easy to propagate and grow can be sold as such. I really do not know what the real Aloe vera looks like, or if I have ever seen it before.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Tony, the aloe is a passalong from decades ago and was only ever called aloe. I actually looked it up, but resisted calling it aloe vera, thinking it probably is, but I don’t know for sure.

      Reply
      1. tonytomeo

        There were a few different specie of aloe at my former home that were all purchased as Aloe vera, but none actually were. From what I understand, the real Aloe vera does not look like much. Prettier specie are easier to sell.

  5. Chloris

    I am always surprised to see you have irises blooming again in the autumn. A lovely unusual arrangement, it’s so very Susie, no one else could have done it.

    Reply

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