In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement every Monday using materials collected from our gardens.

Before thinking consciously of today’s vase in terms of complementary yellow and purple, I had in mind tall stems of fading sunny Rudbeckia, the green cone-heads featured prominently, and backed by a large purply patterned Canna leaf. I also wanted to use pieces of bark saved from a Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle), especially this lichen-covered section.

Lichen and Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Bark

Using two floral pins or frogs I began by inserting the bark.  Next the rudbeckia and canna went in as planned.

Before long I had rescued a stem of Tansy from last week’s vase for more yellow and more texture.

In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

More purples slipped in—Angelonia and Euphorbia ‘Blackbird.’ Much of the bark which was expected to provide a strong impact receded in favor of the angelonia.

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’ has disappointed this year, giving only one or two blooms at a time, but the flowers called out when I was cutting materials and found their way into the design.

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’

Materials
Flowers
Angelonia ‘Purple
Dahlia ‘Fireworks’
Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)
Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Foliage
Canna
Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Bark with Lichen
Container
Oasis Lomey 11″ Designer Dish, black, round
Two Three-inch floral pins (frog)
Black Stones

In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

26 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – July Complementary

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Linda. The Rudbeckia flowers didn’t form well this year. I think the dry weather took its toll on them. Pollinators have been undeterred though and seem quite happy. The cones I always find interesting.

      Reply
  1. Cathy

    Rudbeckia bosses are so photogenic, aren’t they? I love the way they change shape as they mature. Their darkness alomg with the canna leaf andangelonia as well as the dish make a really sultry display, so the dahlias and tansy are spot on for contrast. Great result, Susie!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Well Cathy, you’ve taught me another thing this morning. I didn’t know to call those “bosses,” but love the term. Thanks for hosting each week–it’s always lots of fun.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Perhaps ‘boss’ is not used that way in the US – here it would be used to mean the central raised part of something like a shield or carved ceiling. And the raised centre of blooms like rubbeckia!

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I like the texture of those “bosses” as Cathy calls them. They didn’t photograph as well as I’d hoped and show up darker than they actually are.

      Reply
  2. Peter Herpst

    Delightful! I love the Rudbeckias at that stage and you’ve used them well. The bark & lichen – it’s all wonderful.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Peter. The Rudbeckias started fading almost immediately this year because (I imagine) our extremely dry weather. Finally we’ve been getting some rain again.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, glad you like it. This is one that really looks better in person. The photos flattened it quite a bit and the colors are brighter than they show up in the pictures–so I’m enjoying having it in the foyer where I walk by it frequently.

      Reply
  3. tonytomeo

    What canna is that? I grew ‘Australia’ a few years ago to contrast with the pale green of common houseleek. The form contrasts nicely too!
    Goodness, yours is much more than in a vase; it is total floral design like might be seen at a flower show

    Reply

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