Savorings From The June Garden

My husband and I began a six-week mindfulness meditation class yesterday. Among the exercises for the first week is one to choose an activity that you often do in automatic pilot and pay special attention to the activity, to what is happening right now.

My mind jumped immediately to the garden, thinking a stroll around the garden would be  a great activity for noticing what is happening in this moment, becoming aware of sights, sounds, textures, colors. But this is expressly one activity that I never do in autopilot. Being in the garden naturally leads to curiosity, exploring, slowing down and savoring each moment.

Here is a sampling of the garden in early June, a few things that help me pause and just notice.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) (possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) (possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’)

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge) and Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

Dahlia ‘Fireworks’

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

What are you savoring in your garden this June?

22 thoughts on “Savorings From The June Garden

  1. Kris P

    There’s a lot to love in your garden this June, Susie. The Gladiolas alone are spectacular. Achillea ‘Moonshine’ and Agapanthus are the stand-outs in my June garden.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. One set of gladiolas surprised me by opening all at once, a nostalgic favorite in my garden. I’m a great admirer of your Agapanthus and you have some of the best achilea ever. Tried leaving a comment on your recent post but it disappeared. Will try again.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The hemerocallis are from a daylily farm near where I grew up. My sister took me and my daughter a few years back and treated us several.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I tried for a while to get rid of the butterfly plant because I read they are invasive here. But it keeps coming back. With all the rain we had this spring it looks better than usual.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    It is all lovely, and certainly requires detailed inspection! The rich red day lily is gorgeous and I envy you your Echinacea and Monarda – either the slugs or the mildew get mine so I have given up! Enjoy your garden this June Susie. 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I’ve seen slugs this year but not something I’ve had trouble with in the past. Mildew can be an issue with Monarda here too but for now the plants are still fresh and strong. It has spread something terrible though. Fortunately I and the hummingbirds enjoy it.

      Reply
  3. Chloris

    Indeed, that is the wonderful thing about the garden. You don’t need to practise mindfulness and living in the moment, you do it automatically. You have so much to enjoy, such an abundance of beautiful blooms.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much. Oh, I love glads. My grandmother used to go out every morning and cut fresh glads and add to a vase on her sun porch. I have her little clippers she used.

      Reply
  4. Christina

    As you say, the garden is always a place that it is easy to be mindful in. Did you choose something else that might be a harder test? Your garden is still going strong this year, many of these flowers had finished when I met you two years ago (gosh, or was it three)

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I chose eating mindfully. It works for the first couple minutes, then I have to bring my awareness back when I find I’m just gulping the next bite. Honestly it is very effective and has carried over into other activities. You and R. were here 3 years ago to the day, I just found the pictures June 16, 2015 of us at Duke Gardens! You saw my garden at its very worst Christina and I appreciate that you didn’t laugh out loud! This year the rains have carried it along nicely.

      Reply
  5. rusty duck

    You’re well ahead of me! I’m still waiting for verbena, shasta daises and monarda. And I love Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’. Just looked it up.. I can get it here. Yay!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh I think you’ll enjoy Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’. I had it for many years in a pot, then lost it during a bad drought. This spring I replaced it and am trying it in the ground.

      Reply
  6. gardeninacity

    We have several favorite plants in common – butterflyweed, spiderwort, bee balm – but ours are not yet blooming. Here we are going through our “blue period” – spiderwort, hardy geranium, clematis, nepeta.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Those blues are hard to beat. My Jackmanii Clematis started out ok but hasn’t done great this year. Spiderwort has done too well and needs culling.

      Reply

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