In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Seeing anemones in my spring garden is a treat. These is a high attrition rate, few of those planted in the past few years ever made it to bloom. One particular batch overcame the odds though and even managed to return for several years, but now only three plants remain. Happily the ones left are prolific in their blooms.  Cutting seems to encourage more flowers, so I am happy to oblige.

The arrangement began with a favorite matte-finished, blue-gray jar. I primed the container with clumps of green leaves gathered from an abundant bed of Leucanthemum. This shasta daisy foliage provided a framework to hold the flowering stems of anemone without using mechanics.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Accents of Erysimum, Salvia ‘May Night’ and Iberis were tucked in and around for color, texture and contrast.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ (Wallflower)

Some weeks the vases take a lot of thought and time, but this one floated together in a few short minutes, unwanting of adjustment or second-guessing.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ (Wallflower)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)
Foliage
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Vase
Handmade ceramic lidded jar

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

31 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

  1. Edinburgh Garden Diary

    I adore those anemones and one day will perhaps find space for them in my own garden, although I’m sorry to hear they’re so picky about growing. Also loved the non-mechanics of the Shasta daisy foliage – how clever.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It’s turned cooler again so spring has been nice and slow. But yes, there are a enough things blooming now it’s easier to find things for Monday vases.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    I have started some Mr Fokker anemones in my new greenhouse, Susie! They always look stunning but you have enhanced yours beautifully in the vase with the salvia and that ‘quite pretty’ wallflower! Good thinking to use the leucanthemum leaves. Love the matte finish of the vase too, which I would like to be able to touch

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Great way to initiate the greenhouse Cathy. I should plant some more asap. The vase was a gift from my daughter and it has a nicely-designed lid, which I should have included in the photo. I will have to look up the potter someday.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    I love seeing these anemones each spring Susie. They just don’t grow for me. Too hot and dry in summer perhaps? I shall enjoy yours instead!

    Reply
  4. Peter Herpst

    Your gorgeous anemones have me wanting to try some in my own garden. Beautifully combined and arranged as always!

    Reply
  5. Kris P

    It’s a lovely composition and the pinky tones of the wallflower add just the right amount of contrast. I’ve had a horrible time growing anemones and probably need to accept that they can only be annuals here, and maybe try them in my cutting garden space where they have a better chance of getting the water they need. In any case, I enjoy seeing yours!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Beth! Just learned today at my garden club that blue is the everyone’s favorite color, across cultures and between men and women.

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    A perfect vase – oh how I love your Mr Fokker. So large, lush and simply blue! The little dainty points of the salvia are a great contrast for that ‘fullness’!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Haven’t tried them in pots but found this on Sarah Raven website:
      Plant them shallow, in a pot with decent depth – they have quite a deep root run – placing them claws upwards, about 2in deep and about 4in apart. Water them well on planting and then leave them be, checking occasionally that the soil is not bone dry, but don’t overwater.

      Reply
  7. rickii

    A carpet of blue anemones was the first wow factor this spring but they are the short-stemmed variety. Must remember to go for some of these for cutting. Not sure I could use them as artfully as you always manage to do.

    Reply

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