In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A second group of irises abruptly opened all at once on Saturday. My first thought was to showcase them in a lush bouquet, but as springtime settles in there is competition for what enters the Monday vase. So this week only one stalk of iris stands sentry. This is Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’ (and friends).

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A late-blooming narcissus and Solomon’s seal were two surprises I had not remembered to expect.  Finding them changed the direction today’s vase took. The pair proved challenging to combine but I like the echo of yellow between the trumpet of one and the broad leaves of the other.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

The Solomon’s seal is a 2-year old passalong from my friend Chris.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

I stair-stepped the narcissus faces in parallel with the dangling flowers of Solomon’s seal; eventually the effect was lost to the greater cause of trying to balance the overall design.

In the end the physical limitation of the floral pin in the vase dictated the final look.  There just was room to add a slender stem of Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple.’

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Materials
Flowers
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Narcissus
Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple’
Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)
Foliage
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Vase
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

39 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, I’m happy you like it Christina. The disparate elements made it challenging but I was determined to include the special blooms of the week.

      Reply
  1. carrotsandcalendula

    I just can’t get over how beautiful your Iris ‘Raspberry Blush’ is. I mean to start growing more irises this year, not least because my eldest daughter is named for them, and this is one I would love to have.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      ‘Raspberry Blush’ is one of the few irises I actually bought, most are passalongs. I’ve never been quite convinced the label was accurate as its color seems more orange than raspberry, but it is a great bloomer.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    You are right about the Solomon’s Seal picking out the trumpets of the narcissi, and I particularly noticed today how the eye was drawn up from the lower elements to the tall stem of the iris, which I readily admit looks most attractive here! Thanks for your valued contributions to IAVOM, Susie

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, that iris looks like it’s standing sentry, doesn’t it? It’s always fun to see what you and others do each week and have the chance to participate. I enjoy the discipline of making a vase each week.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        A sentry? Yes, I get that! I agree about the discipline – the habit is so engrained now and it really is wonderful always having some sort of vase in the house

  3. Donna@GardensEyeView

    That stunning low vase is perfect to allow the flowers to shine….the addition of the peach iris was really an eye catcher along with the addition of the variegated leaf Solomon’s Seal….perfect arrangement of all the elements.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Donna. I have 3 vases from that company and enjoy using them very much. Almost anything looks good in them because they are so pretty.

      Reply
  4. tonytomeo

    I do not see the candytuft or the Shasta daisy. The iris rox! When I was in school, we got in trouble for ‘borrowing’ some pink iris rhizomes. I wrote about it a long time ago. I do not know what cultivar they were. ‘Raspberry Blush’ sounds familiar, like it is one of the more traditional pink bearded iris. I am not good with names. I happen to like the Solomon’s seal because it does not look so good here. It can grow wild, but seems to look shabby for us.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Tony, you’re right! I made up the list of materials before I did the design and ended up not using the candytuft. The Shasta is there though, just leaves–the lower ones on either side.

      Reply
  5. Eliza Waters

    SO lovely, Susie. You’ve set the Solomon’s Seal perfectly to highlight the dangling bells and the Narcissi look so well with it. The RB iris is the cherry on top – perfecto!

    Reply
  6. Kris P

    This arrangement won another deep sigh from me, Susie – it’s just so beautiful! The soft pastel colors blend together perfectly. How long does an Ikebana arrangement like this last? You’re breaking down the inclinations of this confirmed vase-crammer by making a strong case for trying this kind of arrangement.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, but you have such an abundance of blooms Kris you almost have to feature big, generous arrangements, and I love them! The Ikebana-style vases keep well as long as your check the water often. Helps to condition them before using, but I don’t always take the time. Really depends on the individual flower.

      Reply
  7. Peter Herpst

    Oh Susie, you’ve outdone yourself. Every arrangement you share instantly becomes my favorite. Your talent is an inspiration.

    Reply

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