In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In contrast to last week’s frilly arrangement, today’s vase features a limited color palette, one that I enjoy: a restful combination of blue/violet, green and white.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

The starting point was Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker.’ Only a couple plants came back this year, so I must be sure to plan for more.  They are very difficult to grow in my garden and now I do not want to live without them.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

 

White flowers work well in arrangements and I love them in my garden. Iberis sempervirens (candytuft) is dotted around the borders. Sometimes it survives for years, other times only one season. I have been unable to figure out a perfect formula, but a sweet yoga friend, Suzanne, increased my candytuft holdings with a generous gift from her yard last summer.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

I was not planning to repeat yet another pale yellow hyacinth, but it was needed to help balance the design. As violet’s complementary color I knew it would fit in well, but the color is so soft it nearly comes off as white.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Other white blooms today include my favorite pure white Thalia Daffodils, which have just begun to open, and several stems of Leucojum, which I was pleased to see are continuing to bloom.

Narcissus ‘Thalia’

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth) sprang into action this week. I came across them only at the last minute, when searching for a few more stems to complete today’s design.

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Hyacinthus orientalis (Hyacinth Sunrise Mix)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Leucojum (Snowflake)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)
Foliage
Narcissus leaf
Phalaenopsis (moth orchid) leaves
Vase
Footed ceramic dish, charcoal gray matte finish

Two broad, dark green leaves of Phalaenopsis orchids create a backdrop for the flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

54 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – March Subtlety

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Christina. In reviewing the photos I’ve realized the daffodils are a bit too tall. Roughly, the height should be twice the width of the container, but I do like the way this one turned out.

      Reply
  1. Cathy Burnham

    Wow! This one is a real winner, Susie. Stunning!

    Cathy Burnham Please excuse typos and autocorrects

    >

    Reply
  2. Diana Studer

    I could have stripped the garden of flowers, but mine would have come mostly purple with a few white pelargoniums and Iceberg roses.

    Ah – those leaves would make it worth growing the orchid. Large and spreading, but not too large. Perfect balance for your combination. I was hunting for something that size but my Strelitzia leaves are far too big!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’m trying to get up the nerve to compost the orchids accumulated the last couple years. Only one has rebloomed and they take a lot of counter space I need to reclaim.

      Reply
  3. Linda from Each Little World

    Oh, this is just spectacular. I think the limited colors makes the form of the flowers and the display itself all show to better effect. And it is just perfect in your little alcove. So much nicer than a telephone which I think is what those were originally intended to hold.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Linda. When looking at the house years ago our realtor kept suggesting that space would be perfect for my flowers, but my husband is a big Th. Jefferson fan, so keeps a bust of him there. I move it every once in a while though.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    Oh I had to smile at your thoughts on composting orchids, Susie, having just done so with two received as gifts on Mothers Day last year and the year before, neither of which have rebloomed – and yet when I read in the post that you had used an orchid leaf my first thought was ‘What a shame, I could at least have used the leaves even if they never reflowered’! But I have no regrets 🙂 Your clean and cool vase is prefect, with the contrasting white and blue/violet. Thalia daffodils are beautiful, and I might need to boost the ones I planted 18 months ago. Thanks for sharing this delightful little statement

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, I’m sure I’ll have no regrets getting rid of the underperforming orchids, if I can bring myself to actually do the deed. Glad I thought to use the leaves because the design needed that green backdrop. I should grow more foliage plants.

      Reply
  5. AlisonC

    Blue and white is a classic and always elegant. Thalia is one of my favourites. I have trouble with anemones too though they are supposed to be easy. I should take lessons.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh, blue and white do it for me. Thalia is very nice. Hope they produce well this year. Most of my daffodils are crowded and aren’t blooming quite as well. If you discover the key to anemones, please share. I’ve read to soak them overnight before planting and plant on their side as it’s difficult to distinguish top from bottom. Let the corm figure it out.

      Reply
      1. AlisonC

        I’ve tried soaking them and they do swell up. Sometimes they rot so perhaps I’m overwatering. I recently wondered if I have been planting them upside down! That won’t have helped so on their side is a good idea. I’ll try that.

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Donna, I think you’re right about the calming colors. They suit me well–favorites in fact. Took a weekend workshop to learn about Yoga Nidra. It was awesome (and of course, deeply relaxing).

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    Stunning! The orchid leaves provide a perfect background and the anemone and white flowers look fabulous together. You have got another ‘wow’ from me this week Susie! 😀

    Reply
  7. Kris P

    This is an incredibly beautiful arrangement, Susie. Not only are the flowers perfect specimens of their species but you’ve arranged them in a way that allows the beauty of each to shine within the elegant framework created by its companions. I’ve said it before but it deserves repeating : you are an artist!

    Reply
  8. Lisa at Greenbow

    I was wondering to myself if those were orchid leaves. They do really set off all of these delicate blooms. Happy IAVOM.

    Reply
  9. P&B

    Less is more. With ‘limited color palette’ makes everything stand out. This arrangement is really perfect. I can also understand why you love ‘Mr. Fokker’ anemone so much; it has such a rich blue color.

    Reply

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