In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Springtime flowers and colors can be a bit frilly, but I resisted the urge to create something more abstract and restrained this week. As we set the clocks ahead this weekend to enjoy more daylight I decided to acknowledge and embrace the generosity and bounty of spring

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

It has been too cold and wet to enjoy the garden much recently and I have postponed much-needed weeding and other chores. Browsing around the borders on Friday I noticed 5 or 6 stems of lavender hyacinths had all flopped down toward the ground. Whether something was eating the roots or recent cold temperatures had caused the collapse I could not determine. Other colors nearby seemed fine. So it remains a mystery, but I rescued them for today’s vase. They seem to be taking in water and continue to look fresh.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

The pale yellow hyacinth continues to be a favorite, but it is joined this week by a more buttery yellow that is quite nice.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Bursting with flowers, bridal wreath spiraea was used to achieve height and textural relief.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

A small patch of Leucojum has been blooming recently. These are pass-alongs from my sisters’  garden. I gathered a few and tucked them into the vase for a little surprise when viewing at close range.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Materials
Flowers
Hyacinthus orientalis (Hyacinth Sunrise Mix)
Leucojum (Snowflake)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Foliage
None
Vase
Glazed ceramic vase

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

Colors Of Spring Trio -March 4, 2018

Many readers were interested to know how long last week’s submerged flowers would last.

I had prepared the vases on Sunday mid-day. The anemone began fading after a day and a half, but kept intact. After another half-day (Tuesday morning), it was done and the water was colored purple.

The hyacinth lasted until Wednesday.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

44 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Spring Frills

  1. Christina

    All your Hyacinths look lovely but like you I think the creamy white one looks very special. Your Spiraea is ahead of mine; I can’t wait to be able to use it in a vase too, it’s lovely and airy.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The spiraea has been a bright spot in the garden the past week. Weather has been terrible but I’ve enjoyed looking out at the shrub encases in white blooms.

      Reply
      1. Christina

        We had two days when it was so warm we had lunch outside. But this week it is very cold and very wet again. I mustn’t complain about the wet but I can do without the hailstones we had today!!!

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hyacinths were a bit overwhelming in this quantity so I moved them to a place I could admire them from afar and catch a an occasional whiff.

      Reply
  2. Donna@GardensEyeView

    Oh Susie this spring vase is what makes my heart sing…hyacinths are my favorite and these are stunning with the white blooms in that lovely vase. I love the frilliness of the vase, and thanks for the update on the submerged flowers. The 3rd winter storm is coming and we are staying in winter through March so I needed a shot of spring.

    Reply
  3. AlisonC

    These are so pretty, a delight. I must look out for a spirea. I know the flowering is short but they are so lovely while they do flower. I love these colours.

    Reply
  4. Peter Herpst

    I love the way the shape of the vase makes the flowers seem to burst forth with the excitement of spring. As usual, extremely well done!

    Reply
  5. Cathy

    It has been an eye opener seeing your yellow hyacinths recently Susie, as I always thought I wouldn’t like them, but seeing yours is changing my mind. And the spirea blooms are stunning – how long will they contine flowering for on the plant? That must be a sight to see! Your vase has such a useful shape too, helping the blooms to splay out. Thanks for updating us on the submerged blooms

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. I usually discard spiraea after a couple days. It will last a long while but I don’t want to forget about it and have to pick up those white flowers everywhere.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yum, those almonds sound good right now don’t they? I’ve had the spiraea many years, brought here from my last garden. It’s drooping this afternoon in a snow storm, so glad I brought some stems indoors.

      Reply
  6. tonytomeo

    Cathy was just talking about that sort of backdrop and vase. As much as I dig hyacinth, I really dig the spirea. It is like baby’s breath on a stick.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The spirea is always a charmer this time of year. It spreads by the roots though so I have to keep forcing it back into its designated spot.

      Reply
  7. Annette

    Hi Susi, this is a lovely pastel posy! Didn’t know you you were affected by the cold spell too. Crazy weather all over! Neither did I know that you change clocks two weeks before we change ours. Alas, spring isn’t far, let’s embrace it 🤗

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      As the snow falls this afternoon, I am calm, even knowing my hydrangeas probably are ruined once again for this season. I love the daylight savings time, keeping more daylight suits me well. Here’s to spring Annette.

      Reply
      1. Annette

        That’s why I stopped planting H. macrophylla in my Swiss garden but thankfully there are others which don’t fear the cold. The paniculatas are gorgeous too. In France they think of putting an end to the changing of the clocks, don’t know how I feel about this yet.

      2. pbmgarden Post author

        Two of my H. macrophylla were given to me by a fellow garden blogger when I had just started blogging. The third H. macrophylla was given to me last year by my cousin. It came from my grandmother’s house, so I really hope I can keep it safe and (perhaps) even see it bloom freely one day. I’m beginning to add some other hydrangeas that bloom on old and new growth, but they’re not happy here yet. Looks like one of three survived the hot, drought-filled summer last year. Hope the clock adjustments will end up up suiting your nature. Apparently we al react differently to the tinkering of time.

      3. Annette

        yes, they definitely don’t like hot and dry summers which we have too, so people tuck them in beds on north-facing walls, my best one is Ayesha which copes so much better with these conditions (Ayesha is Turkish, isn’t it? maybe that’s why) check it out, the flowers are so pretty, like lilac flowers. Just took some cuttings.

  8. Kris P

    Frilly it may be but the prettiness of spring is what we all appreciate. Despite the recent bout of horrible winter weather in the east, your garden is doing its part to move the seasons along. I love the Easter egg colors of the hyacinths and the frothy aspect of the Spiraea, another plant I wish I could grow. Thanks for the update on the flower submersion experiment too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’m surprised spiraea doesn’t suit your environs–it’s pretty agressive here. Your have so much for choice though and I love the things you are able to grow.

      Reply
  9. Cathy

    I love the Spiraea Susie. It goes so nicely with the frothy Hyacinths. My larger hyacinths always lean at odd angles so if i catch them early enough they get cut. I never seem to have anything suitable to go with them in a vase though, so this year I will look out if my spiraea (an unnamed one) flowers around the same time. It’s a lovely combination!

    Reply

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