In A Vase On Monday – Thanksgiving Sugar Rush

In A Vase On Monday – Thanksgiving Sugar Rush

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

This week we will celebrate Thanksgiving Day in the United States. Today’s sugar rush is from the discovery of Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ preparing to bloom. I included a couple of stems along with another surprise, a sprig of Meadow Sage ‘May Night.’

Meadow Sage, Erysimum

Meadow Sage, Erysimum

Thinking there would be nothing else flowering except the previously featured chrysanthemums and camellias, I planned to concentrate on foliage today. The Spiraea shrub has been gloriously orange this week; lavender is producing fresh young leaves; Gold Dust Aucuba leaves maintain year-round interest. From the back screened porch I also harvested a few leaves from a potted Begonia, a cutting from a succulent (that ended up hidden at the base) and fronds of fern.

In A Vase On Monday – Thanksgiving Sugar Rush

The focal flower of the design, a soft yellow chrysanthemum, picks up the aucuba’s yellow accents.

Chrysanthemum With Begonia, Aucuba, Lavender Foliage

Several dried coral roses saved from a purchased bouquet complete the color harmony.

Dried Roses With Spiraea Leaves

Materials

Flowers
Chrysanthemum
Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’
Meadow Sage ‘May Night’
Rose (dried)

Foliage
Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)
Begonia
Fern
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)
Succuclent (unknown)

Container
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Thanksgiving Sugar Rush

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

45 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Thanksgiving Sugar Rush

  1. Pingback: In a vase on Monday – homage – Creating my own garden of the Hesperides

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Christina! I planted the Erysimum last December after stumbling upon it at a garden center, then I think it bloomed in spring. Perhaps it was fooled by a few cold nights, followed by a warming period into thinking it was spring. This is my first time planting it.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I bought the Erysimum in early December last year. It overwintered and bloomed in spring. So I was surprised to find it in bloom, but maybe it likes the cool days. I’m planning to look for some more at the garden center.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh Cathy, thanks for the generous praise. I always see things I wish I’d done differently, but knowing there’ll be another vase to work on next Monday helps makes experimenting fun and not stressful. It’s a great way to learn.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Marian, hope you enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving too. Thought about you the other day–it was about a year ago when you came to Chapel Hill to speak.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Noelle, I’m glad you like it. When I see the photos I always spot things that need adjusting a bit, but I rarely go back and make changes at that point.

      Reply
  2. Kris P

    The dried roses are a wonderful touch, Susie. I love that Erysimum too and shall remain on the look-out for the plants locally – I need more seasonally appropriate floral color in my garden. Have a very happy Thanksgiving!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope my comment went through ok on your blog. Loved both your vases. I just realized I bought that Erysimum last December so I should be on the lookout for more also.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    The beautiful Chrysanthemum at the heart of the arrangement is wonderful. Overall a lovely shape. I had no idea Erysimum is also called Meadow Sage. I love the Acuba foliage too. I have a small plant, but they grow so slowly here that I hardly ever cut any! Have a lovely Thanksgiving!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Sorry for the confusion Cathy. The Erysimum actually is separate from the Meadow Sage ‘May Night’. I didn’t label them very clearly. My Aucuba is also is growing very slowly, but it’s in an out-of-the-way spot so I rarely see it unless I bringing a few leaves.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I don’t usually have roses so it was fun to see these dry so well. Don’t know if my comment went through but I liked the dill in your arrangement.

      Reply
      1. AlisonC

        Oh no, I don’t think it did. I don’t understand comments sometimes mine just disappear. Thank you and thanks for trying. Gales here today so the dill may be on the ground tomorrow.

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Just checked and I bought that Erysimum last December, so maybe this is the right time for it to bloom. I’ll have to look it up again. That sugar rush series seems to be popular at garden centers online.

      Reply
  4. Chloris

    So elegant Susie. I was expecting to see your lovely Camellia Yuletide. I hope we’ll get another glimpse of it before Christmas. But this is gorgeous, I love the erysimum.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you. I expect Yuletide will indeed make another appearance. Glad you like that camellia. My grandmother had one in her front yard that was a huge tree.

      Reply
  5. Helen Battersby

    I’m in envy of your wallflowers – a treasured childhood memory of my grandmother’s garden in Wales. The colour of yours is outstanding; much richer than her yellows and oranges. Do they have the same delicious scent?

    Reply

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