In A Vase On Monday – Summer Bouquet

In A Vase On Monday – Summer Bouquet

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Summertime flowers spill into each other throughout the borders.

In A Vase On Monday – Summer Bouquet

Passalong dahlias and everlasting sweet peas are particularly lush this year.

Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)

Dahlia – passalong from Libby

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ has been a star in the garden for several months. Echinacea too are having a good year, encouraged by frequent rain.

Tucked in the back–Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ and Echinacea

Most of the Lamb’s ear (another passalong) has long ago faded, but several fresh flowers are forming.

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

A few gladioli are flowering here and there. This one is from last season. I planted quite a few new corms but they have not begun to bloom.

Sweet Pea, Dahlia and Gladiolus

 

Materials

Flowers
Dahlia
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)
Gladiolus
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial or Everlasting sweet pea)
Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Vase
Dark blue ceramic vase

In A Vase On Monday – Summer Bouquet

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

36 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday – Summer Bouquet

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. That came from my garden mentor more than 30 years ago. I brought it to this garden when we moved, along with many other plants she had given me. Unfortunately the perennial sweet pea is not fragrant.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Too bad about your dahlias Judy. This passalong dahlia is very hardy. I look forward to seeing your little sweet peas when they flower.

      Reply
  1. Annette

    Ah, I love this vase, Susie, so pretty and the way you’ve managed to get the flowers dance, gracefully and airy. Beautiful colours too and I see you’ve used Dahlias as well. They’re such great cut flowers. Have a good week 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Annette, I kept trimming away more and more foliage that originally I’d hoped to retain. The flowers do need their space though and the leaves had to go. Your dahlias are amazing.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Perfectly chosen colour blends, Susie – they work so well together and reflect the description you gave of your garden: ‘summertime flowers spill into each other throughout the borders’. Lovely 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Delighted you enjoyed the words employed to introduce the vase. I sometimes fuss over the phrasing way too long, but one came easily. At the Blogger’s Fling I heard someone mention many people are shifting away from their blogs and leaning toward just posting pictures on Instagram/Twitter, etc. with very little commentary. Personally I love crafting the writing.

      Reply
  3. Kris P

    It’s a symphony of blooms, Susie! I love the color combination – the rich tone of the dahlias prevents the pinks from becoming saccharine, which is something I always struggle with when using pink flowers in vases. And how wonderful to have everlasting sweet peas, something I find hard to even imagine! I’m off to check whether that species has any hope of growing in my climate.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Kris, pink is far from my favorite color (flowers or otherwise) so it’s ironic how many pink blooms show up in my garden. It’s unusual for the everlasting sweet pea to still be flowering. Some years the plant has been burnt to a crisp in the heat of the summer. With lots of rain this year it continues to surprise.

      Reply
  4. Noelle

    So beautifully arranged, posed and photographed. The colours are beautifully counterpointed. The term passalong is a new one to me and such a lovely way of acknowledging the wonderful way we can share good plants. I only heard on a gardening programme this week that it takes 100 days from planting gladioli corms to their flowering…s

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank for the reminder the gladioli need more time. The foliage on the new ones looks promising. My garden was created based on passalongs and I wish I could take credit for the term, but no.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. Sometimes red flowers are very persnickety about being photographed but these cooperated nicely. This sweet pea is gorgeous in all stages. This afternoon I noticed one flower starting to fade and it does so in the most graceful way, shifting from pink to nearly indigo.

      Reply
  5. theshrubqueen

    Love it, you are making me miss my Southern garden! I had the same gladiolus, thought they were hideous at first and grew to love them. As weird as this may seem, what I really miss is having the glad foliage in arrangements, nothing is better for a strong vertical accent. The color combination with the foliage is perfect with the vase.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you. Pretty sure this pink glad came in a “Blue” collection! I agree the foliage is versatile to use–same with iris leaves.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      This has been quite the year for coneflowers. Have never seen them do so well. But the heat index was 105 yesterday and it’s amazing how quickly everything is shutting down since Monday.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. I wouldn’t have thought to order an arrangement of flowers in those colors, they’re just what was available in the garden, but I must say they’ve been enjoyable all week.

      Reply

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