Recent Blooms As Summer Wanes

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

It feels a bit strange, but welcome all the same, to see a bearded iris reblooming. This one is a pass-along and I do not know its name. This image is from August 27. The flowers lasted but a short time under the strong summer sun.

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

There’s been essentially no rain for 6 weeks so the garden looks sad. A few blooms here and there lift my spirits, but can do only so much. I do have a few photographs of flowers taken over the last couple of weeks to record and document the waning days of Summer 2016. Today seems to be bloom day so the timing works well. Some of the pictures from September 2 have water droplets that disprove my memory, but the rain was brief, not the quenching, restorative kind.

Zinnia

Zinnia – September 2, 2016

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' (Black-eyed Susan)

Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ (Black-eyed Susan) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Marigold

Marigold

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Periwinkle (Vinca)

Periwinkle (Vinca) – September 2, 2016

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides – September 2, 2016

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata 'Nicky'

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ – September 2, 2016

Euphorbia 'Shorty' (Shorty Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge) – September 2, 2016

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower) – September 2, 2016

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush) – September 2, 2016

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood) – September 2, 2016

With apologies to anyone who is sensitive to spiders, this intrepid garden sentry has been a constant presence for several weeks. Just after I discovered it (and almost backed into it), the Yellow Garden spider relocated to its current location from the other side of the tree. It is also sometimes know as Writing Spider.

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) -August 27, 2016

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) – September 2, 2016

With the pressing heat the garden has not been tended for weeks. I made a quick stop this afternoon in search of Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) to replace Angelonia, the stalwart of the meditation circle from June until frost.

I should have shopped at a better garden center but it is unlikely I will have time to get to one. At this store the available snapdragons were generically labelled and although I had hoped for white ones, the choices were either “unknown” (because no flowers had opened) or yellow or this multicolored one that I chose. It sports mixed flowers of red, pink, coral and yellow and should add some pep to the labyrinth.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

 

 

 

25 thoughts on “Recent Blooms As Summer Wanes

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, I don’t irrigate the garden nor even hand-water except for new plants, so things look tired without regular rain. We were lucky to have as much as we did through July.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Sorry for late reply–your comment was caught up in spam folder. Thank you for your kind words. Hope by now you’ve had some good rains, as we have. The spider was a constant presence for 3-4 weeks. Just noticed the other day she was no longer there.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I planted snapdragons 2 years ago that I enjoyed immensely, but waited too late last year so I decided to go ahead and buy this year. Probably should have gone to farmer’s market but busy schedule lately means that might not happen (unless you make it and then I will try).

      Reply
  1. Kris P

    Despite the saying that “misery loves company,” I’m dismayed to hear you and so many gardeners in the east reporting on the shortage of rain. I hope things turnaround soon, Susie. I love the yellow Iris – and even the yellow spider.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris, you have suffered your share of dry weather. We were lucky spring through July but once it turns dry like this the plants can’t live on the memory of earlier times for long. The spider is an oddity in my garden. I check for her (I think it’s female) every day.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    It was extremely dry here too for a few weeks, but today it is raining at last and I think summer is coming to an end. You still have some lovely flowers despite the drought. And a beautiful spider! I love snapdragons but we have the same problem here in spring where they are sold before they open… I have tried going back a week or two later but then they are sold out! Those colours are gorgeous, and I think the circle will look refreshed with them in place. Hope you’ll share a photo of it! 😉

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh, I’m glad you got some rain. I’m excited about changing out the plantings in the meditation circle with the snapdragons, but haven’t had time yet to do it.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The garden or writing spider females are from 19–28 mm (0.75–1.10 in) according to wikipedia, but that must be just the main body. Those legs add plenty of length.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you had rain Christina. A little rain every week would be nice, not all or none, which is what we’ve had this year. The only time I grew snapdragons they looked nice in fall, stayed semi-green in winter without blooms, then were gorgeous in spring. As I recall though the winter was fairly mild.

      Reply
  3. bittster

    I’m sure your snapdragons will work out just fine. Better to have them in early rather than wait too long and have nothing!
    I’ve been very happy with my angelonias as well. They’ve been completely trouble free and I’m sure I’ll have a few again next year.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Frank, yes angelonia is a wonder plant, very reliable. Looking forward to the snapdragons–they’re not something I’ve grown but once before.

      Reply
  4. Chloris

    we have had weeks of dry weather too, the garden seems to be wilting. You have some lovely late summer blooms. That iris is amazing, what a bonus. I have never seen a spider like that before, my goodness, he is huge. I wouldn’t dare step outside with that lying in wait.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Finally, we’ve had some rain overnight. Hope some finds your garden also. The spider is intimidating, but interesting all the same. I keep my distance.

      Reply
  5. Vinny Idol

    These are some sharp photos. The colors are very vivacious. That spider is like your personal garden bodyguard. The Jasminoides look like helicopter propellers. Excellent job.

    Reply

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