In A Vase On Monday—Welcome

In A Vase On Monday - Welcome

In A Vase On Monday – Welcome

Today brings a welcome chance to share the garden by participating in Cathy’s weekly call to display our cut flowers In A Vase On Monday. My vase was prepared several days ago.

This past week I finally cleared the Southern Side Path of grass, pruned a couple of overgrown shrubs to make it easier to pass by, and deadheaded lamb’s ears, echinacea and more. The fence gate in the photo below belongs to my neighbors. Mine is not visible, but the slate path curves to the right, leading visitors through the gate and into the main garden.

Southern Side Path

Southern Side Path – After clean up

At the right corner guarding the back entrance, a large Green-Headed Coneflower had been taking its job much too seriously, reaching out from the house and blocking traffic from both directions. I cut away and removed all of the overhanging stalks, which were still covered in golden yellow petals and pollinators galore. (Can’t remember the last time I wrote “galore.”)

This plant, Rudbeckia laciniata, grows 6-7 feet tall and begins blooming early to mid-July. Although the trimmings were generously oversized, I decided I could use them for a Monday arrangement if I left them outdoors. Normally left unadorned by the front door, a  large periwinkle ceramic urn made the perfect container.

In A Vase On Monday - Welcome

In A Vase On Monday – Welcome

A tall glass vase of water was placed inside the urn to hold the the rudbeckias. The flowers sit cheerfully at the front door to welcome company. I was too tired to worry about arranging them carefully, but now wish I had taken a few more minutes to pose them.

That the pollinators would not mind being relocated was one thing I had not anticipated. When dinner guests actually did arrive Saturday, dozens of bees and other insects were hanging around. Entering the front door required calculation and prowess.

Bee and Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Bee and Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

I tried to identify this skipper and thought I had found a match on Jeff Pippin’s site, until I read the description: “Indian Skipper (Hesperia sassacus): In NC, this butterfly is rare to uncommon and found only in the mountains. Indian Skippers are single brooded, flying in May/June. The host plants are various grasses, and this species is commonly found nectaring on Red Clover.”

So much for my skipper skills. Wrong place, wrong time, wrong plant. If anyone recognizes this insect, I would like to know what it is.

Unknown Skipper on Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Unknown Skipper on Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

This one I believe is Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus).

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) With Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) With Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)

Materials
Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)
Ceramic Urn

In summer I love to fill the house inside with flowers as well, not formal arrangements, just colorful blossoms lining the counters and tables, tucked into window sills and corners. These are a few from the weekend dinner party.

More Vases

More Vases

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy) and Angelonia ‘Serena White’

More Flowers

More Flowers

More Flowers

More Flowers

Many thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly floral arrangement celebration. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

39 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Welcome

  1. Christina

    Coincidence! I have a large bucket filled with Rudbeckia waiting to be arranged that I picked yesterday morning. They are a jolly welcome at your front door.All the other vases are lovely statements of summer too; you dinner guests must have been very impressed by such a welcome.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Rudbeckia celebration–it’s that time of summer. Christina, I won’t place them so close to the front door next time. Fortunately no one was too worried about being stung.

      Reply
  2. Eliza Waters

    Love your small vase collection – what a treat for the eyes! I like the big, bold front porch arrangement, too. The blue vase contrasts well with the yellow, so pleasing.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Eliza. Used to pick up little vases at local street fairs but haven’t done that lately. They’ve come in handy through the years.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    Your little indoor posies are so sweet (and isn’t it a joy having them even for ourselves too?!) and the rudbeckia are stunning – Irish Eyes is definitely not in this league at all! Thanks for sharing today

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I love your Irish Eyes Cathy, but this rudbeckia is useful too. I do keep little posies around (and did even before your famous meme) for a constant bit of cheer. We can all use some.

      Reply
  4. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    Oh my Susie your vases just are joyous singing summer all throughout your house. And then there is the urn at your door welcoming all…what a statement…and pollinators still visiting. I love the idea of an urn next to the door and may borrow that idea if i can find the right vase. I have lots of heliopsis to cut down. My Rudbeckia laciniata is a hard worker too, but it hasn’t bloomed yet.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Donna, the little flower vases do seem to sing of summer. Hope you find just the right urn for your door. The color of mine is more periwinkle than the photos suggest, and when I saw the pot I just had to have it. No regrets.

      Reply
  5. Kris P

    What a wonderful welcome, Susie! I found the urn with the Rudbeckia all the more delightful for the inclusion of the pollinators – as long as there are no wasps, bugs at the door are cool with me. Your assorted vases are all wonderful. I’m impressed by the range of flowers you’re able to gather from your garden this time of year.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. The no wasps rule is ok by me. The pollinators are attracted to that rudbeckia but I was surprised they were (and still are) so active after they’ve been cut. Some things just have one or two blooms left but I’d rather cut them and enjoy them inside rather than let them swelter in our 97-degree sun.

      Reply
  6. theshrubqueen

    Prunings are great when they work out like yours did! Are you growing Wallflowers? or what are the purple spikes in the small vases? Wondrous celebration of the prolificity of summer.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. The purple spikes are Angelonia, sometimes known as Summer Snapdragon. It’s an annual that needs no deadheading, tolerates drought or rain, and will bloom until October’s first frost.

      Reply
  7. Cathy

    Galorious! 😉 That is such a wonderful welcome by your front door I would just love to pop over and visit! The combination of Angelonia and Leucanthemum is lovely Susie. I really like that white Angelonia. And all your other vases dotted around the house are a great way to bring the garden indoors when it is too warm to go out much. 🙂

    Reply
  8. bittster

    The pure white arrangement is my favorite! I love the daisies with the angelonia.
    The rudbeckia by the door also worked out very well. It sure does make a welcoming look as long as the bees aren’t too energetic and close!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. I liked that white arrangement too. Even with all the wonderful summer color in the other vases, that one was my favorite. Reached across some echinacea while deadheading yesterday and got another bee sting. First time in years and now two stings. My fault both times but painful.

      Reply
  9. Stephi

    Beautiful arrangements. The colors of the Rudbeckia and vase by the door really are welcoming. To people and pollinators 🐝🐝beautiful indoor arrangements as well. My garden seems to be waning, but I may be inspired to try my hand at putting some in a vase and enjoying them.

    Reply

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