In A Vase On Monday—Late February Profferings

In A Vase On Monday - Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

In A Vase On Monday – Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.  After last Monday’s snow, sleet and ice covered the garden once more, the weather relented, and the days since have been mild and mostly sunny.

The Coral Delight Camellia featured last week with rescued, faded blooms is back with a fresher look. And Hellebores deserve a share of spotlight as they are at last coming into full flower in the garden.

Late February Profferings

Late February Profferings

As I gathered these cut flowers on Sunday morning I intended to work them all into a single arrangement. But after conditioning them in water (while my husband and I ran out to brunch with a friend), it seemed quicker and more manageable to keep the two main types of flowers separated.

There were a half-dozen camellias in bloom, perfect for displaying in a set of footed cordial glasses.

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ has a semi-double flower, deep coral pink in color. The plant is slow-growing, aspiring to 6-8 feet high. This one is about 4.5 feet tall after about ten years, with dark, shiny foliage.

The blooms are brushed with white markings on the petals.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Hellebores in my garden have been reluctant to open this winter. I visited a hellebore farm yesterday with a friend and we were surprised to find fewer blooming plants than imagined. When I have organized my pictures I will write more about the visit and purchases.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Only one daffodil was blooming yesterday, but many more are about to burst onto the scene.  I included it with the hellebores for a sparkle of color. Purple stems of statice from a store-bought bouquet from last month and a piece of Shorty Euphorbia from last week’s vase were used as filler.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The hellebores were placed into a Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase, detailed with pansy motif and leaves around the rim.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
6 Cordial glasses (footed) with silver caddy

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (shorty Spurge)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Limonium sinuatum (statice)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)
Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

41 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Late February Profferings

  1. Cath

    Both of your arrangements are beautiful. I love the little botanic gardens vase and the arrangement suits it well. The dark leaves and intense colour of the Camelias looks lovely against the silver handle.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cath, my sister gave me the botanic vase so it is a pleasure to use it. Camellias seem to be very formal flowers so I hoped the silver set them off.

      Reply
  2. Christina

    Two beautiful vases again Susie; I think you were right to keep the Camellias and Hellebores separate; the former are such a saturated colour they might have overwhelmed the delicate Hellebores. Hope you had a fun time buying hellebores, yesterday, I’ll look forward to reading about your visit.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Christina! I think you’re right about the camellias dominating if paired with the hellebores. They look more intense indoors than they did at first in the sunlight. The trip was fun.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    It is especially lovely to see your camellias as I only have a very young one and have seen no buds on it yet… But your hellebore vase is so pretty too and is perfect in the Portmerion jug – we have some bowls in this design and I was considering them the other day but they would be such an awkward shape to use. Thnaks for sharing yours – and I would be interested to read about your visit to the hellebore farm so must check out your blog again in a little while

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Would love to have the Portmerion bowls too, but you’re right. That shape would be a challenge to use. My sister brought me that vase from a trip she took to England so it makes a special start for an arrangement. Will try to get organized and post about the hellebore farm in a day or so.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Our bowls were ridiculously cheap from a car boot sale – new but’seconds’, although probably only minor misplacing of some of the transfers. I would love to have a jug or two but they are expensive to buy new …

  4. Noelle

    Susie, my eye is increasingly drawn to coral this year as a colour…your vase of camellias is just the right tone of pink coral, and the other vase is also very attractive.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris. It does have a rich color. Originally there were 3 Coral Delights but two were in a bit more sun and succumbed during their first year in my garden. This one is blooming a bit early this year.

      Reply
  5. Beth @ PlantPostings

    I like the way you list your elements at the end. I’ve never clipped my Hellebores for display because each bloom seems so precious, but the plants are starting to be large enough that I should have plenty of blooms to spare some for vases. Beautiful arrangements! Thanks for this peek at spring!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I picked up that idea of the materials list from my garden club. It does take hellebores a while to get established and blooming well, doesn’t it. Mine don’t last very well indoors or rather they’re unpredictable.

      Reply
  6. rickii

    February, and already we are finding material to fill more than one vase. I always seem to have a bit left over. Can’t throw it away, so little vases pop up all over the house. Fun! Both of your arrangements are stunning.

    Reply
  7. Hannah

    Your camellias are such a lovely color, Susie, I like the light brushstrokes of white. They look stunning in the stemware with the silver tray and handle! Your camellias are a little like some of mine, I like the darker pink edges and the speckling. The purple statice looks so pretty with them, I don’t have much blooming yet for accompaniment to my hellebores. They rule in February!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The white mark on the camellia is intriguing. I assume it is supposed to be there, but have seen photos where the petals didn’t have the white. I like it though.

      Reply
  8. Cathy

    How lovely…. sigh! if I could grow Camellias I would choose this colour as it is my favourite of them all. Last week I saw a short report on the Camellias in the Munich botanical garden, but the one time I went to see them they were not yet in flower! Your hellebores are pretty and the foliage also looks very good. And your Portmeirion vase is also worthy of much envy! 😉

    Reply
  9. susanpots

    I really like your hellebore arrangement. To me they are such a challenge to show in a vase, since the blooms sort of hang down. My garden is across the country from you in Oregon, and my hellebores live next to, and below, an east-facing deck. They love their location and have multiplied generously.

    Reply
  10. bittster

    The camellias are so perfect and formal and what a strong color. They must really say spring for your garden… not that the hellebores do not, but they’re a more antiqued subtle look. I think they do look better separate and enjoying their own strengths.

    Reply

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