In A Vase On Monday—February In Royal Blue

In A Vase On Monday - February In Royal Blue

In A Vase On Monday – February In Royal Blue

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

Sunday was 70°F and in the main garden sun melted away the last stubborn patch of snow from the previous weekend. Though there are bulbs springing up everywhere the garden looks exhausted.

A couple of stems of hellebore combined with arum and ilex foliage were the only potential vase materials to catch my eye during a morning inspection. Supplementing them are a fresh set of white and red blooms from indoor pots of cyclamen.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

A royal blue goblet lends a punch of unpredictability.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Materials
Arum italicum
Cyclamen
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Ilex crenata (Japanese holly)
Ikebana Kenzan (floral pin frog)

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

It is helpful to study the design in black and white. This is the same image as above.

Study in black and white

Study in black and white

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

43 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—February In Royal Blue

  1. Christina

    Love that blue vase, it really does add a punch to the arrangement. We have a lovely sunny day today too, which is lovely. I’m glad you reminded us about looking at images in back and white; I do it for the garden but haven’t tried it for a vase yet; it really lets you see the form and strength of the arrangement.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The sunshine is a true gift isn’t it? I often view images of my vases (and sometimes other garden scenes) in B&W. The red cyclamen really hold their own against the blue goblet but in B&W I see they’re very similar in color value. Makes me wonder if more contrast would have been more effective. I don’t know.

      Reply
  2. AnnetteM

    So elegant. I have Ilex Crenata too, what a useful shrub it is. Mine looks a lighter green than yours. Interesting to see it in black and white too. I keep meaning to do more black and white photography, but then I forget!

    Reply
  3. theshrubqueen

    Beautiful, your Cyclamen are outstanding, I love Royal blue glass as well. A good use for the workhorse shrub, Japanese Holly, the texture is a perfect complement to the flowers.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Charlie, glad you like it. There are six of those goblets and I use them for water glasses. Will have to consider using them as vases more often.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh, those glasses are so fun aren’t they? I have 6 I like to use for water also. Never tried using one as a vase before. Staging the photos is important I think and I do hope they help convey the design. Thanks.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    It wasn’t all obvious that the red and white blooms were cyclamen – what obliging plants you have to keep going with barely any attention. As always you have used the perfect combination of blooms and foliage, and of course the blue glass is brilliant to hold them all. Thanks for sharing

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. A very accommodating window provides the cyclamen with just the light they love, apparently. I’d like to grow them outdoors sometime though. There are so few blooms available in my garden this year–the blue vase was the only new element I could think of to add.

      Reply
  5. Kris P

    Simple and utterly beautiful, Susie! You made wonderful use of the light with your photographs too. I’m glad to hear that the snow has cleared out too – your temperatures are warmer than ours!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Kris! I read you had a bad storm in LA. Hope things were fine for you. We had way too many errands to fully enjoy the lovely day, but each moment in the sun was all the more precious. We even had lunch on the screen porch.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It’s funny how we associate colors. The pink hellebores were no match for that red, white and blue. It’s rare that I can find anything true blue either on the 4th!

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I agree Sarah, it is nice to experiment. Each week I look forward to trying out another vase combination, but just as much, learn from seeing everyone else’s.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      There are so few blooms in my garden just now I am making do with what I can find. Sometimes it’s easier to have those kinds of limits–makes you try something a bit unusual.

      Reply
  6. Beth @ PlantPostings

    Oh, to have blooms in winter! I like the red/white/blue combination. Thanks for the tip on photographing the creation in B&W–you’re right: It does provide an improved perspective on the form of the arrangement!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Beth, there aren’t very many winter blooms this year, but each one is appreciated! I like trying out the different software filters on my photos, although I rarely choose one in the end. They’re still fun and interesting to explore.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Donna. Some of the arum leaves were broken from last week’s ice so thought I might as well bring them indoors. Love the intricate pattern on those leaves and the shape also.

      Reply
  7. Cathy

    I love the contrast of the flowers to the striking blue goblet. Your cyclamen really adds zing, but the black and white photo is lovely too. Arum leaves always look good and I am now determined to try growing one this year!

    Reply
  8. Anna

    Red, white and blue are a most eye-catching combination Susie. It was also most interesting to see the same photo in black and white. I grew up in age when all photos were black and white 🙂

    Reply

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