In A Vase On Monday—Ruby Moon And Star

In A Vase On Monday - Ruby Moon And Star

In A Vase On Monday – Ruby Moon And Star

This last Monday of 2015 brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

Do you know the term Full Cold Moon? It is new to me, but suddenly this year I began seeing it frequently in the news.  “December’s full moon, the last of the year, is called the Full Cold Moon because it occurs during the beginning of winter (NASA).”

This year there was a full moon on Christmas day for the first time since 1977 (the next occurrence is not until 2034). Not surprisingly, given all the rain lately, it was cloudy here as the moon peaked (6:11 a.m. EST), but later we were able to glimpse the rare lunar event.

Inspired by December’s special moon, for this week’s arrangement I started by selecting the container—a ruby moon and star cut glass bowl that usually sits on my dining room buffet. I added only a few flowers allowing the intricate pattern to stand out as the main feature of the design.

In A Vase On Monday - Ruby Moon And Star

In A Vase On Monday – Ruby Moon And Star

Hellebores are beginning to flower and I was able to find one to float in the dish.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

To set adrift alongside the hellebore I collected some colorful pansies from the meditation garden.

Pansies with a sprig of Angelina sedum

Pansies with a sprig of Angelina sedum

The crystal bowl is rather deep. Concerned the pansies were not sturdy enough to sit in such a large amount of water, I placed them into a pair of floating glass globes.

Pansies held in floating glass globes

Pansies held in floating glass globes

The floating globes, a recent hostess gift from my yoga friend Corrina, are lovely I think and are sure to be very useful. Designed with a well in the center to hold tea lights, they worked great for the pansies also.

In A Vase On Monday - Ruby Moon And Star

In A Vase On Monday – Ruby Moon And Star

Materials

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Viola tricolor var. hortensis (Pansy)
Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina Stonecrop)

Here are the moon and star details, with the hellebore peeking though one of the moons.

Hellebore, framed by the moon

Hellebore, framed by the moon

As 2015 comes to a close, I would like to offer a big thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

40 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Ruby Moon And Star

  1. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    What a stunning bowl. The color and design are amazing and I love the flower choices….a perfect ‘moon vase’. Our weather is cooling off so I don’t think the hellebores will flower anytime soon although they have new growth under the old. Love the shot of the hellebore glimpsed through the side of the bowl…perfect!

    It was cloudy here Christmas morning but we were able to see the moon rise Christmas Eve with the sunset.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Donna. I trimmed away some of the hellebore leaves carefully and found many ready to open. It was disappointing to not have a better view of the moon here. Glad you were able to see it.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks WD. The hues of the pansies are a bit different than what I usually plant (I usually go for blue/purple), but I found these on sale. A lot of the six-packs had been merged so I’m enjoying some colors I wouldn’t have probably chosen myself.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Jane, I wish, but no, the bowl is a reproduction from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The original was designed by the Sandwich Glass Company of Massachusetts circa 1880.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Thanks for your good wishes, Susie – it is indeed a privilege to host the meme. Your moon and stars bowl is such an apt vessel for floating the blooms – yet another moon reference! The idea of the glass globes for the pansies is inspired 😃

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The moon caught many people’s attention this week. The glass globes will work stand-al
      one as well as floating in a container, so I am sure you’ll see them again!

      Reply
  3. Kris P

    That ruby glass bowl was an excellent choice to highlight the pretty red violas, Susie. You’ve cleverly turned something small – the pansies – into a major focal point. As it’s finally cooled down here (becoming a bit too cold if you listen to the locals, myself included, whine), I finally broke down and planted some pansies myself. I love the plants but they often shrivel in what have been a host of warm, dry winters. Maybe this year, they’ll hang around awhile.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Kris, you nailed it. That’s exactly was I was hoping to achieve with the pansies and the bowl. I think we’ve been much warmer in NC than you have in LA. Hope your pansies will excel this winter. Mine don’t look great, but they are producing enough flowers I can have a few indoors for color.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’d been checking for Hellebores blooming because I’d seen them already on others’ blogs, but somehow I’d missed them. Most of the ones I found had actually been open a while.

      Reply
  4. Beth @ PlantPostings

    Happy Holidays! I’m glad you were able to see the full moon. Wasn’t it impressive? Where I was–in the Chicago area visiting family–the moon was surrounded by colorful rings and beautiful wispy clouds. Your vase is so appropriate for the lunar event and the season. Cheers!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Happy New Year Beth! Chicago is a place I’d like to visit for the museums. Our moon was not as spectacular as in other places but at least I can say for the record I saw it!

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Ricki. A teacher in a flower design class told us to decide what is the focus of the design and that it could be the container itself. She gave us permission.

      Reply

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