Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – November 2015

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

It is time again for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides.

Admittedly, I am a spring gardener and even this month’s welcoming mild temperatures and mostly sunny days have done little to reignite my interest in gardening for this year; however, after an uninspiringly hot, dry summer followed by several weeks of rainy deluges in early autumn, November has ushered in a calming, peaceful charm to my little garden.

After a couple of light frosts touched the plants, some of the more delicate specimens quickly retreated. Overall there is still a generous amount of green, but Hydrangea macrophylla offers an embarrassed blush, having never flowered this year.

Hydrangea macrophylla

Hydrangea macrophylla

Artemisia in the side garden retains much of its integrity.

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Anemone coronaria had a fine blooming season this spring and early summer, then it completely died back. It has achieved fresh new foliage in the past month or so.

Anemone coronaria

Anemone coronaria

Iberis did not bloom well this year, but the green leaves have revived. Achillea is extremely aggressive but I like its fern-like foliage.

Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow) and Iberis sempervirens

Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow) and Iberis sempervirens

Planted in late spring this shade-loving Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba) survived the tough summer and is now forming berries.

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' (Gold Dust Aucuba)

Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)

Also in the shade nearby, the ever-so-slow-growing Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box) sports dark green foliage.

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

In several places Daffodils are emerging. I used to worry about this odd behavior but they always manage.

Daffodils

Daffodils

Foliage of Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ adds nice texture and color to the border. Only a few leaves at the top of the plant suggest a rainbow. I have not grown this plant before so perhaps it will continue  to develop richer colors in the leaves, but the variegation is already quite nice.

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

A few branches of Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower) display red leaves, but most have simply turned brown.

Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower)

Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower)

More red leaves, these are from the dwarf Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers.’

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers' (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

I moved a lot of Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ out of the meditation circle and into the borders.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

There are plenty of fresh gray-green leaves of Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) around the garden.

Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Yesterday I planted three Gardenia jasminoides (cape jasmine) purchased from a farmers market vendor. The leaves on these species gardenias are much larger, thinner and less glossy than my other gardenias.

Gardenia jasminoides (cape jasmine)

Gardenia jasminoides (cape jasmine)

Thanks to Christina at Garden of the Hesperides for hosting. Read her foliage update and see more links to foliage perspectives from many parts of the world.

10 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – November 2015

  1. Christina

    Lots of green, Susie, but I love the rich tones of Hydrangea quercifolia, it is magnificent. Interesting that you usually lose interest in the garden at this time and I recover mine. Thanks for joining in this month. Have a good week.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The Hydrangea quercifolia suffered so much during the hot, dry summer I did not expect it to put on much of a show this fall but it pulled through. What if I’d planted 5 or 7, not just 1? I need to imagine a bolder plan.

      Reply
  2. Marian St.Clair

    It looks like you are having better luck with your Ascot Rainbow euphorbia than I am. Three years after planting, most of it has reverted to the species and now has dull, olive green foliage. We’ve had a couple of light frosts here, but looks like tonight will be the real deal with temps in the 20s. I’m just hoping for a week of blue skies with plenty of sunshine. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Marian, glad you warned me about the weather. Looks like we’re in for the same. I wonder if Ascot rainbow needs lots of sun to retain the color? Mine was just planted this past spring so it will be interesting to see how well it holds up. Hope you have a wonderful and sunny Thanksgiving Marian!

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    I love the way you have described some of your plants as if they have real personalities. 🙂 Your first photo reminded me how much I like Euphorbias and I must put some on my spring planting list, as they do tend to look good all winter in my rockery. Your pictures are so cheering on a wet day here, where any hint of green has disappeared beneath a very thin layer of snow!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much Cathy! Glad to offer some cheer for you today. That’s your first snowfall, isn’t it? We’re expecting below freezing temperatures tonight. I also want to add more Euphorbias. Have been hesitant because I read they can be aggressive, but so far I’ve not seen that happen.

      Reply
  4. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    I love seeing all your foliage…it is just about gone here with each frost….but I have spied the bulb foliage coming up…it is so confused by our warmer weather….it does feel more like spring than late fall.

    Reply

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